Longtime readers know that they won’t find many Paleo desserts on my blog or in my cookbook or app. It’s not that I don’t enjoy the occasional sweet treat; I’m an admitted recovering sugar addict, after all. I’m just not a baker. I don’t have the patience or talent for it, and it’s probably for the best. I’d much rather tweak a cauliflower recipe over and over again than try to figure out how to make the perfect Paleo pastry—especially ’cause I’d be tempted to eat up all of my failed baking experiments. That’s also why whenever I bake, I rely on experts who have perfected the craft, so that I’m guaranteed a satisfying treat on the first try.
These fig bars have a lot going on, and your taste buds are sure to thank you for such a nice midday treat. At the same time they are loaded with healthy things like apples, peaches, and the figs themselves. They’ve removed any trace of grains, and are using coconut flour to put them into bar form, with just the right amount of honey to make these sweet but not overly so. The use of cinnamon, nutmeg, and ginger really balances out the flavor profile for these, and you can eat them between breakfast and lunch, or between lunch and dinner so they’re very good to have handy.
Thankfully I baked just one first, and was able to alter the recipe in time. It was so crumbly and dry, it was a bit like sawdust. (My almond butter was not runny at all, and it was pure almonds.) I added an extra egg and a few tablespoons of honey, hoping to get some moisture, and that helped considerably.I wouldn’t call them fabulous, but a good cookie if you’re Paleo or the full GAPS diet.
I just made these with Stevia. I replaced all coconut sugar with about 1/2 tsp Sweet Leaf Stevia powder then tasted the batter before I divided & baked. I added just a hint more stevia because (true confessions) I LOVE SUGAR! I also went heavy on the vanilla because really, stevia has a little bitter aftertaste and the vanilla helps cloak that. These are delicious. I am expecting that the swap brings the caloric value of the cookie down by approximately 30 calories/cookie if the bath made 12. I only got 10 after sampling a few spoons (heaping) of the batter.
Fruits are nature’s nutrient-rich sweet treats and unprocessed, they have a whole host of health benefits to offer including detoxifying, disease-fighting antioxidants and phytonutrients, vitamins, minerals and fiber. Because of this and how well they’re generally tolerated by the body, all types of fruits are considered a great part of a healthy and balanced paleo diet. However, because most do contain high levels of fructose (a fast-digesting carbohydrate), many paleo enthusiasts recommend watching your fruit consumption, especially if you’re trying to lose weight.
Although it may seem like a no-brainer that eating a balanced diet rich in natural, fresh foods (like veggies, fruits, sustainable animal meats, some starchy plants, leaves, anti-inflammatory fatty acids and oils, nuts and seeds) improves health, research proves that “going Paleo” is one of the healthiest lifestyles and diets that modern humans can adopt.
Unless you’ve been living under a (ahem, Paleolithic) rock, you’ve heard about the paleo diet. The diet may lead to weight loss in the short term, as well as lower blood pressure, controlled blood sugar, and other possible benefits. (1, 2) So it’s no surprise that this eating approach has gained popularity since the publication in 2010 of the hit book The Paleo Diet, authored by Loren Cordain, PhD, a professor emeritus at Colorado State University in Ft. Collins and the founder of the paleo diet movement.

Oils are trickier. Loren Cordain, Ph.D., founder of The Paleo Diet Movement, breaks down which oils are healthy on the paleo diet: olive, walnut, flaxseed, macadamia, avocado and coconut oils are all allowed because they were gathered directly from the plant. While our hunter-gatherer ancestors probably did not consume flaxseed oil, it is allowed because of its content of high alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), a type of heart-healthy, anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty acid.
I’ve been doing a lot of sweets lately and I think it needs to come to an end! My kids would rather I not stop though 🙂 And I agree that outside pressure often gets us to do things that aren’t good for us – a lot of times without realizing. It’s hard to step back and figure out what’s actually good for US on the inside. I struggle with that sort of thing often.
Going paleo means casting aside the Western aversion to fats, especially those of the saturated variety. While there are plenty of popular oils and fats that truly are bad for your health (particularly processed seed oils), there are others that provide critical nutrients—not to mention taste and richness. Here’s one such sample. Note that the less processed these products are, the better.
I have 9 Paleo snack recipes when you’re on the go so you can stay on track with minimal effort. These are good ideas for work, snacks at home, children’s snacks, and vacations. Sometimes eating on the Paleo diet can be kind of hard. Especially when you are traveling or always on the go. And extra EXTRA hard if you are traveling with kids AND doing the paleo diet. Whew! I’m tired just thinking of it.
If you just crave sweets in general (not an easy craving to fight off), you could be low in a number of nutrients, namely, sulfur. Cruciferous vegetables like broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, kohlrabi, bok choy, kale, rutabaga, collard greens, turnip (root or greens), maca, radish, and wasabi, among others, are great sources of sulfur, Vitamin C and fiber. They’re also great for fighting off cancer cells.

“Many people have a Fred Flintstone notion of Paleo, that it’s meat-centric,” says Julie Mayfield, coauthor of Weeknight Paleo. In fact, she says, meat portions should be no bigger than the size of your palm, with vegetables filling the rest of the plate along with some fruit. “I’ve had countless people who didn’t know what it’s like not to be bloated until they took out grains and dairy,” she says. “It’s like someone with poor eyesight putting on a pair of glasses.”
The diet focuses on unprocessed, whole foods – healthy fats including saturated fat, grass-fed, free-range meat and eggs, lots of fish and seafood, vegetables, fruit, berries, nuts, seeds and some natural sweeteners. It excludes grains, legumes, processed sugar and most dairy. Some people include healthy dairy foods like kefir, full fat natural yogurt, some aged cheese and butter. That, of course, really depends on your sensitivities. We love this way of eating because it also focuses on local, organic produce and good farming practices.
Knowing what to eat is part of it, but following this fairly restrictive lifestyle in a modern environment surrounded by cookies and candy and bagels and pasta is really difficult! Factor in the “carb flu” you might go through in the first few weeks (as your body gets weaned off of carbohydrate fuel and habits), and most people give up on the Paleo diet long before it creates lasting change!
Legumes – beans, lentils, chickpeas and so on. Cashews are not legumes! There are some debates over whether some legumes are safe to consume in moderation, if prepared properly (soaked for 12 hours and then cooked really well to remove the phytic acid and make them easier to digest). You can read this article by Dr. Chris Kresser and this article by Dr. Loren Cordain and make up your own mind like we do. We include green beans and peas but avoid the rest.
Pork rinds aren’t for everyone, but if you’re looking for a salty potato chip alternative, they might be just the ticket. But what exactly are pork rinds? Well, essentially pork rind is the skin of a pig, that when fried, boiled, and/or baked creates a crispy, airy chip-like consistency. Like potato chips, pork rinds also come in a bunch of different flavors, such as BBQ, salt and pepper, and cheese. Make sure to check the ingredients of store bought pork rinds, as only a handful are truly Paleo snacks.
We have a penchant for finding an absurd amount of ways to sweeten our food, as evidenced by our sweetener-laden grocery store aisles. Our many sweeteners also have many names, making it difficult to suss out the added sugars in foods. There are only a few Paleo-friendly sweetening agents: fruit, raw honey, pure maple syrup, and coconut sugar, all of which are low on the glycemic index. Still, these should not be a diet staple. 

These were SO GOOD. I made them with honey and a flax egg and oh my gosh, they turned out so good. Allergic to eggs so that is why I went the flax egg route, but used honey since I didn’t have any coconut sugar left- turned out AMAZING. I also melted my almond butter and coconut oil together and then put the mixture in the fridge before rolling into balls and sprinkled with sea salt before baking, but my goodness, seriously the most amazing fudgey treat 🙂
These chips are made from butternut squash, but you won’t be able to tell by the way they taste. They bake up so crispy and crunchy you’d swear it was a potato chip if you didn’t know any better. They are using gingerbread seasoning on these, which is an interesting choice for a snack, and sure to give your taste buds a new experience. Compared to most snacks you’ll enjoy the fact that these rank pretty well in terms of the amount of carbs they contain, as well as the calories. Not that you’re counting any of that stuff on Paleo, it’s just nice to know.
A more controversial argument for why legumes and common grains are avoided is because of their high phytic acid content, which is thought to reduce the absorption of certain nutrients like iron zinc and calcium (6). However, phytic acid is also found in many paleo approved foods (like almonds and hazelnuts), and is associated with some health benefits - like protective benefits against kidney stones, antioxidant properties and a suggested link to lower risk for colon cancer (7,8,9). Bottom line, there really isn't any evidenced based reason to avoid these foods because of phytic acid. 
We love nuts and they are decidedly paleo diet friendly. Be careful though, as cashews are high in fat and, for some reason, it’s incredibly easy to eat an entire jar of them in one sitting (that’s not just us, is it?). If you’re trying to lose weight, limit the amount of nuts you’re consuming. Otherwise, have at it. I mean, you can’t beat a good almond/pecan/walnut mix, can you?
Longtime readers know that they won’t find many Paleo desserts on my blog or in my cookbook or app. It’s not that I don’t enjoy the occasional sweet treat; I’m an admitted recovering sugar addict, after all. I’m just not a baker. I don’t have the patience or talent for it, and it’s probably for the best. I’d much rather tweak a cauliflower recipe over and over again than try to figure out how to make the perfect Paleo pastry—especially ’cause I’d be tempted to eat up all of my failed baking experiments. That’s also why whenever I bake, I rely on experts who have perfected the craft, so that I’m guaranteed a satisfying treat on the first try.
Make and chill the cookie dough. In a large bowl, place the 1 1/2 cups of almond flour and 1/2 cup tapioca flour, or 1 2/3 cup almond flour and 1/4 cup coconut flour), salt, baking soda, and sugar, and whisk to combine well. Create a well in the center of the dry ingredients, and add the coconut oil, eggs, and vanilla and mixing to combine. Add the chocolate chips to the cookie dough, and mix until the chips are evenly distributed throughout the dough. Both varieties of the dough will be soft but the almond flour/coconut flour combination will be softer than the almond flour/tapioca starch combination. Cover the bowl and place in the refrigerator for at least an hour and up to 2 days.
Dairy is a touchy subject. It’s widely considered a gray area in the Paleo community. Much of the world’s population cannot tolerate lactose, the sugar found in milk. Mass commercially-produced milk comes from industrially farmed cows, undesirable from both a health and ethical standpoint. That said, grass-fed and pasture-raised cows produce higher-quality milk. Fermented dairy, like yogurt and kefir, also offers the benefits of probiotics. If you choose to consume dairy, opt for the quality stuff. Otherwise, try additive-free nut and coconut milks.

Hi Steve, coconut flour absolutely will not work here because it’s 3x more absorbent than almond flour. You only want to use coconut flour in recipes that call for it because it performs so uniquely. If you had to use coconut flour, you would want to use 1/3 of the amount, but I would recommend using my coconut flour chocolate chip cookies instead, which have been formulated specifically to use that kind of flour.


While dairy products are fairly obvious, grains and legumes can be confusing. Wheat is an obvious grain, but corn and corn-based ingredients also fall into this category. Pseudo grains, such as quinoa, amaranth, and buckwheat, are generally not recommended because they can cause grain-like digestive problems. Legumes means not only beans (including soy), but peas, lentils, and peanuts (including peanut butters and oils).

These fig bars have a lot going on, and your taste buds are sure to thank you for such a nice midday treat. At the same time they are loaded with healthy things like apples, peaches, and the figs themselves. They’ve removed any trace of grains, and are using coconut flour to put them into bar form, with just the right amount of honey to make these sweet but not overly so. The use of cinnamon, nutmeg, and ginger really balances out the flavor profile for these, and you can eat them between breakfast and lunch, or between lunch and dinner so they’re very good to have handy.


Roll the dough into 8 (75-gram) balls and place the remaining 1/4 cup (43 grams) of chocolate chips on the top and on the sides of the dough balls. You can also roll them into 16 smaller balls but then you need to adjust the baking time (a few minutes less than recommended below). Place 4" apart on the prepared baking sheet. Press the cookies down lightly with the palm of your hand.

Hey Nichole! I do not recommend using coconut flour as a substitute for almond flour. Coconut flour absorbs significantly more liquid than almond flour and your cookies would almost definitely turn out dry. If you cannot use Almond flour I’d recommend trying tapioca flour or an all-purpose gluten-free flour although I haven’t tested either option so I cannot guarantee results. Bob’s Red Mill makes an all-purpose paleo baking flour but I am not sure if it has nuts or not. You should be able to substitute sunflower butter but if they can eat cashews I’d more highly recommend cashew butter as a substitution!
Almond butter and most other nut butters, like sunflower, coconut, hazelnut, and cashew butter, are Paleo-friendly and make for a tasty treat. Try nut butter spread on bananas or apples for a healthy snack, or even just a spoonful right out of the jar, which is a decadent treat. If you’re counting calories, cashew butter has the fewest, at about 94 per tablespoon, followed by almond butter with 98. Plus, nuts offer a ton of health benefits, including fighting diseases such as heart disease and cancer, so here are more reasons to snack on them. Note: Peanuts are not Paleo, which means peanut butter is off limits.
Legumes – beans, lentils, chickpeas and so on. Cashews are not legumes! There are some debates over whether some legumes are safe to consume in moderation, if prepared properly (soaked for 12 hours and then cooked really well to remove the phytic acid and make them easier to digest). You can read this article by Dr. Chris Kresser and this article by Dr. Loren Cordain and make up your own mind like we do. We include green beans and peas but avoid the rest.
Dairy is a touchy subject. It’s widely considered a gray area in the Paleo community. Much of the world’s population cannot tolerate lactose, the sugar found in milk. Mass commercially-produced milk comes from industrially farmed cows, undesirable from both a health and ethical standpoint. That said, grass-fed and pasture-raised cows produce higher-quality milk. Fermented dairy, like yogurt and kefir, also offers the benefits of probiotics. If you choose to consume dairy, opt for the quality stuff. Otherwise, try additive-free nut and coconut milks.
Kale chips are one of the healthiest snacks on the planet, and you don’t have to be a gourmet chef in order to get them right. The beauty of eating kale chips is that there’s no debate over whether they are Paleo or not. The ingredients are as simple as it gets: as much kale as you want with enough olive oil to coat them, and then some salt and pepper until you’re happy with the way they taste. Making them is super easy, and doesn’t take long from start to finish, maybe 20 minutes total. Eat these for a protein and fiber packed snack with lots of vitamins and minerals.
These crackers are easy to prepare and it’s always a good idea to have a crunchy food around to munch on. These are very versatile, you can use them to scoop up any dip you create, or you can make a chicken salad and use them for that as well. They only have three ingredients, so it’s easy enough to keep stocked up and since it doesn’t take long to make these you don’t have to worry about storing them you can just make them as you need them so they’re fresh and crispy.
If you’ve been with me a long time, you know that Grams can not get enough of this drupe! Yep, I had to say drupe. One day, I might even achieve my lifelong dream of saying “drupe” out loud. Stay tuned. Anyway, I’ve dedicated these chocolate coconut bars, this paleo almond joy, friggin’ coconut chocolate chip ICE CREAM, and chocolate coconut truffles (!) to her. But by far, one of her very favorites was my paleo vegan coconut macaroons.
High-quality, grass-fed, pasture-raised beef should be included in every paleo diet. With an impressive, energy-boosting nutritional profile including vitamin B12’s, zinc and iron, beef also contains a good amount of protein and fat to keep you satisfied and full for longer. This is particularly beneficial if you’re trying to lose weight and will also help you to maintain lean muscle mass and a healthy metabolism.
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Like plantain chips, kale chips are also a smart Paleo snack (and a healthier version of potato chips). Kale has a ton of health benefits and is full of vitamins and antioxidants. While plantain chips are smaller and hard to scoop, kale chips go great with dips, like guacamole or salsa, because of their larger sheet-like size. They are very easy to make at home but can also be found at most grocery stores nationwide. Need more reasons to add kale to your diet? Here are five ways kale fights off obesity, cancers, and diseases.
I had baked these bad boys early Sunday morning just to double check the recipe for the 10th time before this post goes up (no joke). While mixing the dough, I realized I’ve baked these cookies more than anything else in the past two months (the paleo chocolate banana bread was a close second). Even though I’m not paleo or necessarily grain free, I love making paleo treats because they actually fill me up, don’t need as much sugar as your typical dessert and tend to be lower in carbs. Winning in all categories right there.
The aim of this approach is to eat like our Paleolithic ancestors, who didn’t have farms that provided food groups like grains and most dairy, and didn’t have access to the fast foods and packaged snacks many Americans nosh on routinely today. “The paleo diet is all about unprocessed, natural foods: Think vegetables, fruit, meat, seafood, natural fat sources, nuts, seeds, and eggs,” says Ginger Hultin, RDN, a wellness coach with Arivale based in Seattle.

One way to avoid eating potatoes as a snack is to replace a popular snack like potato chips with a healthier version. Using zucchini in place of the potatoes is a great idea, and gives you added nutrition. Zucchini makes a great choice to make into a chip because all it requires is some slicing and you have nice round pieces ready to be made into chips. They are easy to make, and the recipe is versatile in how it lets you dust them with whatever seasonings you like. This means you could make them BBQ Zucchini chips, or Ranch Zucchini chips, just by adding different seasonings. Just be sure to check the label on the seasoning packet to see if it’s Paleo.

Oh, wow. These are GOOD. I made them exactly as is. First, I couldn’t stop eating the dough (which is bad because I’m pregnant and there is raw egg). I just had my first one and I am going back for another. Love how these are healthy to help keep my pregnancy weight gain in check, but also totally craving satisfying! I will be making these again, for sure. Thank you!


This is a complete list of foods not allowed on the paleo diet. It’s a sad day when you first have to say goodbye to these foods but, once you start, it’s much easier and you find there are even better paleo substitutes for these foods. The first few weeks might be tough, but if you stick with it over time, it’ll be worth it. We promise. Here’s the ultimate list of foods not allowed on the paleo diet.
So happy to hear you enjoyed the cookies, Jane! Coconut sugar is one of my favorites, and has a very low glycemic index so it doesn’t spike your blood sugar too much. It is a bit sweet, so you can definitely cut down on the sugar next time you make them if you taste buds prefer. Thanks so much for subscribing, I hope you find lots of recipes here to love.
A very strict 30 day elimination diet founded on Paleo principles, the goal of which is to fight food addiction and help identify problematic foods on an individual level. Promotes whole, real foods, shuns all processed foods, including those made with “Paleo” ingredients. Check out the books It Starts With Food and The Whole30 by Melissa Hartwig and Dallas Hartwig for more information.
Hi. I used 1/4 cup of molasses and 3/4 cup of erythritol. When I first tasted the cookie I thought it was a little bit too sweet, but now the taste seems perfect. With the erythritol and molasses in place of sugar, I can eat the cookie without a negative impact on my blood glucose. I like them so much I’m going to bake more and send them to my mother who is also diabetic.
The Primal Blueprint leaves room for legumes (other than unfermented, organic soy) in close moderation, but those on a paleo diet tend to steer clear of them. Like nuts and seeds, legumes contain anti-nutrients like lectins, phytates and saponins. Unlike nuts and seeds, however, legumes tend to be consumed in large quantities, potentially preventing your body from absorbing sufficient nutrients for optimum health.
They say that low-fat weight-loss diets have proved in clinical trials and real life to be dismal failures, and that on top of it all, the percentage of fat in the American diet has been decreasing for two decades. Our cholesterol levels have been declining, and we have been smoking less, and yet the incidence of heart disease has not declined as would be expected. ”That is very disconcerting,” Willett says. ”It suggests that something else bad is happening.”
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