These fig bars have a lot going on, and your taste buds are sure to thank you for such a nice midday treat. At the same time they are loaded with healthy things like apples, peaches, and the figs themselves. They’ve removed any trace of grains, and are using coconut flour to put them into bar form, with just the right amount of honey to make these sweet but not overly so. The use of cinnamon, nutmeg, and ginger really balances out the flavor profile for these, and you can eat them between breakfast and lunch, or between lunch and dinner so they’re very good to have handy.
Vanilla is the last ingredient in the cookies. (Yep, these almond cookies only have four ingredients. I know! Crazy, right?) You use a generous amount of vanilla extract! Two teaspoons. However, since the almond and maple bring such strong, lovely flavors to the table, the vanilla extract needs a little boost to get noticed. If you don’t love vanilla, reduce it to one teaspoon or omit completely. (If you omit, add two additional teaspoons of maple syrup to the recipe.)
These are great! I do a lot of gf baking but usually use a gf flour mix (like Bob’s) so was curious about how these would be. Love them. Not too sweet (like so many desserts are) but definitely sweet enough. I used 1/2 butter and 1/2 coconut oil (because I like the richness butter adds, and was low on coconut oil) and texture was perfect (I love that they aren’t greasy like a lot of choc chip cookies.) And I doubled the recipe because when I make cookies I like to have lots! Toddler approved:-)

I just found out that my friend has a nut allergy so I needed to alter a few recipes. After reading through a few paleo web pages, I’m finding that sunflower flour is a good 1:1 substitute for Almond flour. I’m testing that ratio with these cookies now. For a while, because of an issue with the amount of nuts that are “OK” for the diet I started substituted a home-made pumpkin seed flour and entree’s taste just as delicious!
These sweet potato chips do a great job of filling in for regular potato chips. They have the same texture you’re looking for, both as you pick them up and once you put them in your mouth. The sea salt ensures that they’re salty enough to satisfy, and the rosemary gives them a distinct flavor that really plays well with the sweet potato. And of course sweet potatoes bring a lot more to the table in regards to nutrients and fiber, so you’re actually helping yourself along with these rather than with potato chips that will only set you back.
This Caprese-style salad is a great Paleo snack when you have just-right produce or an abundance of basil to use up. You’ll substitute mozzarella for creamy avocado loaded on fresh tomato slices. Top each tomato with basil, drizzle with balsamic vinegar and oil and enjoy. This one is great to enjoy while sitting outdoors enjoying a hot summer night.
These little sandwiches are really pushing the limits of a conventional sandwich. Bacon is serving as the “bread” and guacamole is the thing getting sandwiched. Avocados are bona fide superfood, and contain plenty of potassium, fiber, and healthy fat. Bacon is often the scourge of most diet plans, but on Paleo it is allowed so why not dig in? The two go really well together, and you’ll often find them as add-ons to deli sandwiches because they simply taste that good.
All types of poultry are great to include in a balanced paleo diet and are particularly valuable for those who are very active and, therefore, have higher protein needs. To ensure that the chicken you consume is as natural as possible, look for free range or organic varieties. If you’re trying to lose weight, keep in mind the fact that some cuts of chicken such as thighs contain more fat and calories than others and adjust your quality accordingly.
Roll the dough into 8 (75-gram) balls and place the remaining 1/4 cup (43 grams) of chocolate chips on the top and on the sides of the dough balls. You can also roll them into 16 smaller balls but then you need to adjust the baking time (a few minutes less than recommended below). Place 4" apart on the prepared baking sheet. Press the cookies down lightly with the palm of your hand. 

Let’s get this out of the way upfront: I know calling a cookie recipe the “world’s easiest” sounds a bit ridiculous, but I can explain. The name started out innocently enough — one day, I created an easy-to-make almond cookie recipe. I adored this recipe. In my excitement, I’d say to friends, “You have to try these almond cookies; they’re, like, the world’s easiest cookies.” And well, the name stuck.

Hi Monique! I love all your paleo recipes but am not a friend of the texture/flavor eggs add ( I know it’s not super obvious and noticeable but I generally bake vegan treats so do tend to notice a difference) Your double chocolate paleo bars worked super well with a chia egg (I ate those bars every chance I got!), do you think that would work here too? Thanks so much!
I’ve been doing a lot of sweets lately and I think it needs to come to an end! My kids would rather I not stop though 🙂 And I agree that outside pressure often gets us to do things that aren’t good for us – a lot of times without realizing. It’s hard to step back and figure out what’s actually good for US on the inside. I struggle with that sort of thing often.
While typically considered health foods (who’s ever been angry with a bag of lentils?), legumes have a major downside: phytic acid. According to Paleo Leap, “Phytic acid binds to nutrients in the food, preventing you from absorbing them.” While phytic acid is present in a number of Paleo-friendly foods (like nuts), these foods are generally consumed in smaller quantities. Legumes, however, constitute a staple in many diets around the world, leading to overexposure to phytic acid as well as a host of other antinutrients.
I’ve been doing a lot of sweets lately and I think it needs to come to an end! My kids would rather I not stop though 🙂 And I agree that outside pressure often gets us to do things that aren’t good for us – a lot of times without realizing. It’s hard to step back and figure out what’s actually good for US on the inside. I struggle with that sort of thing often.
The second my mom saw these, she immediately started making plans to hide and portion them. She has the same problem I do with, ya know, not eating the whole batch. In one sitting. She gushed over them, and asked me, “HOW do you do it??” And I’m like, “HOW do you cook so well?!” My mom thinks it’s the funniest thing in the world that she cooks savory food like a boss, and I pretty much exclusively bake.
These cookies are soft and chewy, yummy and still healthy. I eat them all the time for snacks and dessert. One thing I really like about cookies is that they have an automatic portion control. That is unless you eat too many of them. I also like the convenience of cookies because you can grab them and go. Sometimes I eat these for breakfast because they are so healthy.
The diet focuses on unprocessed, whole foods – healthy fats including saturated fat, grass-fed, free-range meat and eggs, lots of fish and seafood, vegetables, fruit, berries, nuts, seeds and some natural sweeteners. It excludes grains, legumes, processed sugar and most dairy. Some people include healthy dairy foods like kefir, full fat natural yogurt, some aged cheese and butter. That, of course, really depends on your sensitivities. We love this way of eating because it also focuses on local, organic produce and good farming practices.
No grains? No problem. Paleo eaters may shun grains, processed vegetable oils, and refined sugars, but that doesn’t stop them from enjoying plenty of delicious dishes—and creating some downright ingenious recipe substitutions. Whether you’re a longtime primal-eating fanatic or just curious about what it’s like to go back to dietary basics, we’ve got 39 delicious Paleo-approved snacks for whenever hunger strikes.
I just made these for the first time and they are INCREDIBLE!! The only major modification I made was adding half the coconut sugar and I was pleasantly surprised that they are plenty sweet without the other 1/4 cup 🙂 I also ended up adding a few splashes of almond milk (I think my almond butter wasn’t well mixed and therefore a little too dry). I used 1 tbsp to measure out each cookie and they still turned out perfect. Thank you so much for the recipe! I’m sure it’s going to be used many more times in the future!
Pumpkin seeds are one of the healthiest seeds you can eat, and making them taste as good as they can means you’ll be more inclined to eat them, and therefore more likely to benefit from the nutrients they contain. This recipe uses real jalapenos to deliver the heat, and keeps things elegant by only using the requisite number of ingredients to get these to taste right. For example, there’s olive oil, which is used to help roast the seeds, but it also helps the paprika and salt stick to the seeds so you get flavor on each one.
These cashew butter balls are made raw so you don’t have to bake them. They’re ready to eat after just an hour in the fridge. The good thing is that you can make many of them at once, and just eat them a bit at a time as you go through your week. Having snacks made ahead of time is really helpful when you’re trying to stick to any diet plan. These are so simple to make it’s just dates, cashews and cashew butter. Roll it into a ball and cool it off and they’re ready to nosh.
These nutrient-packed treats make for a convenient and delicious snack that’s paleo approved. They’re a great source of long-lasting energy and their high fat content will keep you full for longer. It is worth noting though, that because many types of nuts and seeds do contain phytic acid and other anti-nutrients that disrupt optimal digestion, it’s recommended that you consume them in moderation.
Vanilla is the last ingredient in the cookies. (Yep, these almond cookies only have four ingredients. I know! Crazy, right?) You use a generous amount of vanilla extract! Two teaspoons. However, since the almond and maple bring such strong, lovely flavors to the table, the vanilla extract needs a little boost to get noticed. If you don’t love vanilla, reduce it to one teaspoon or omit completely. (If you omit, add two additional teaspoons of maple syrup to the recipe.)
When you're eating paleo, the worst part of the day is in between meals, when a snack craving hits and all you want is a bag of chips. We're here with some good news: Lays is still off limits, but with options like Brussels sprouts chips, roasted edamame, and veggie sushi, you'll look forward to snack time again. And if you're going keto, check out out healthy keto snacks, too.
If you follow a grain-free diet, you’ll want to make your own grain-free baking powder or order a specialty version online because most commercial baking powders contain a grain-based starch, usually cornstarch, to prevent clumping. If you don’t follow a grain-free diet, use whatever baking powder you have on hand. (As long as it’s fresh, of course.)

It’s easy to get plantains and bananas mixed up. While plantains are part of the banana family and the two look alike, plantains are not sweet, and instead are used mostly as a starchy vegetable. Think of plantain chips as veggie chips. They are often sliced and baked with olive oil and salt, creating a nice crunch. Lots of supermarkets carry different versions of plantain chips, but not all plantain chips are Paleo, so you’ll want to check the ingredients before buying.
Don’t feel bad that you can’t have Doritos now that you’re on Paleo, you just have to come up with snacks that aren’t bad for you. These chips use a mixture of coconut flour and almond flour, and have flax seed baked right in so you’re getting a fair bit of nutrition along with your snack. These make great dipping instruments for salsa, guacamole, or any Mexican-inspired dip. They won’t be short on flavor with all of the butter and spices they’re using, so you won’t feel like you’re missing out or stuck eating “health food”. Who knows, you might even end up preferring these.
The paleo diet is based on the principle that if a caveman ate it, so can you. In general, that means that meats, vegetables, fruits, fats, nuts and seeds are on the table while grains, beans, dairy and refined sugars are off. But, in case you don’t have a caveman to call, this list will give you all the information you need to know about which foods to include in the paleo diet and why they’re so good for you. You’ll also find a simple guide to the total protein, fat and carbohydrate content of the listed foods to make it easy to see how they can fit into your daily caloric intake.
I subbed the coconut flour with cricket flour (yes, ground up crickets) and got good results. I made it with coconut oil and eggs and portioned them out and then froze them before baking. I baked the first batch at 325 in a convection oven and it spread quite a bit so I baked the next batch at 350 (convection oven) and it still spread but much less. 

I just made these for the first time and they are INCREDIBLE!! The only major modification I made was adding half the coconut sugar and I was pleasantly surprised that they are plenty sweet without the other 1/4 cup 🙂 I also ended up adding a few splashes of almond milk (I think my almond butter wasn’t well mixed and therefore a little too dry). I used 1 tbsp to measure out each cookie and they still turned out perfect. Thank you so much for the recipe! I’m sure it’s going to be used many more times in the future!
"Snacks can seem like a challenge," when you go paleo, admits registered dietitian Sonya Angelone, a spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. That's why you should keep the ingredients for these quick and easy paleo snacks on hand. Because TBH, even if cavemen didn't eat snacks, well, they also wielded clubs on the regular, so things are just different now.
These are absolutely incredible! I have been searching for a convincing recipe ever since I had to move to a restricted diet and these really do taste like traditional chocolate chip cookies. My sweet tooth boyfriend even eats them up so fast I have to hide them from him! I couldn’t be more pleased with how they came out. This recipe is certainly a keeper :)
These could possibly be my favorite cookie, ever. I love chocolate and peppermint together. They are so easy to make that my daughter makes them all the time. They have to be baked or cooked at all. The hardest part is waiting for them to cool and set in the frig for an hour. The candy canes are just for show because they aren’t Paleo. You can get all the peppermint flavor you need with the peppermint essential oil. If you aren’t 100% strict Paleo, go ahead and add a little bit of peppermint candy; I won’t tell anyone.
We love nuts and they are decidedly paleo diet friendly. Be careful though, as cashews are high in fat and, for some reason, it’s incredibly easy to eat an entire jar of them in one sitting (that’s not just us, is it?). If you’re trying to lose weight, limit the amount of nuts you’re consuming. Otherwise, have at it. I mean, you can’t beat a good almond/pecan/walnut mix, can you?
Fasting for a predetermined period of time, shortening the eating window. Popular IF protocols include daily 16 hour fasts with 8 hour feeding windows, or weekly 24 hour fasts. Less of a “diet,” more of a philosophy. You can combine damn near any diet with a practice of intermittent fasting, be it Paleo, Primal, vegan, vegetarian, Bulletproof, Standard American, or anything between.

These BLT bites have the T built right in because they’re served up on a cherry tomato. She’s using cream cheese here, which you can sub out Paleo approved cream cheese for and be all set. The B of the BLT is covered with a respectable amount of bacon per bite. The T comes in the form of spinach, so you’re getting a nutritional upgrade from plain old lettuce which doesn’t have nearly as many vitamins and nutrients that spinach has. Dust these with a bit of parmesan cheese, one cheese that most Paleo-ers accept as OK, and you’re good to go.
Shaping the almond flour/coconut flour cookies. You can shape these cookies in the same manner as the tapioca variety, but you will need to flatten each ball of dough into a 1/2-inch thick disk on the baking sheet after rolling into a ball. The coconut flour cookies will not spread as readily. Alternatively, divide the coconut flour cookie dough into two equal portions on generous pieces of parchment paper, shape each into a log about 1 1/2 inches in diameter, and wrap each tightly. Place the dough in the refrigerator to chill again for about 30 minutes. Unwrap each piece of dough, slice each into 8 pieces and place about 1 inch apart on the prepared baking sheet.
Hi Steve, coconut flour absolutely will not work here because it’s 3x more absorbent than almond flour. You only want to use coconut flour in recipes that call for it because it performs so uniquely. If you had to use coconut flour, you would want to use 1/3 of the amount, but I would recommend using my coconut flour chocolate chip cookies instead, which have been formulated specifically to use that kind of flour.
These clusters are great for popping, and they’re made from one of the healthiest seeds out there, pumpkin seeds. In fact there’s only four different ingredients to these, so they’ve kept it very simple, and you don’t have to worry if there are any unapproved items here. These are going to be sweet from the use of honey and coconut sugar, with a strong vanilla flavor from the vanilla extract. You can use these to satisfy your sweet tooth without the need to eat an entire dessert.
Although it sometimes gets the name “caveman diet,” paleo eating is right in line with the kind of ingredients Whole Foods Market has always championed: fresh, high-quality real foods. There are no absolute rules, but an emphasis on lean meats and seafood, fruits and veggies, and nuts and seeds is at the heart of paleo. Try these tips for navigating shopping and meal planning.
While typically considered health foods (who’s ever been angry with a bag of lentils?), legumes have a major downside: phytic acid. According to Paleo Leap, “Phytic acid binds to nutrients in the food, preventing you from absorbing them.” While phytic acid is present in a number of Paleo-friendly foods (like nuts), these foods are generally consumed in smaller quantities. Legumes, however, constitute a staple in many diets around the world, leading to overexposure to phytic acid as well as a host of other antinutrients.
Here’s an interesting take on hummus, which is necessary because traditional hummus is not something you can have on Paleo. They’ve replaced the garbanzo beans (aka chickpeas) with a combination of zucchini and avocado, and the result is something that looks a lot like hummus, and tastes really good too. All of the other ingredients in hummus are present, like garlic, tahini, lemon juice, and cumin, so as long as you’re not a hummus snob you should be pleasantly surprised by this concoction.

Sure, there's a bit of debate as to whether true Paleo-ers can have foods like chocolate (which is made with milk solids and sugar). As articulated on Paleo Leap, an online resource for all things Paleo, "In the true sense of whether our Paleolithic ancestors enjoyed [foods like chocolate], the answer is almost always no, but the real question we should ask ourselves is whether they are healthy when consumed in moderation." In essence, it's up to the individual to decide whether or not to include chocolate in their nutritional regime. Paleo-ers who do say yes to chocolate often choose the dark variety -- it tends to be less processed and lower in sugar.
Although it may seem like a no-brainer that eating a balanced diet rich in natural, fresh foods (like veggies, fruits, sustainable animal meats, some starchy plants, leaves, anti-inflammatory fatty acids and oils, nuts and seeds) improves health, research proves that “going Paleo” is one of the healthiest lifestyles and diets that modern humans can adopt.
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