These chips are made from butternut squash, but you won’t be able to tell by the way they taste. They bake up so crispy and crunchy you’d swear it was a potato chip if you didn’t know any better. They are using gingerbread seasoning on these, which is an interesting choice for a snack, and sure to give your taste buds a new experience. Compared to most snacks you’ll enjoy the fact that these rank pretty well in terms of the amount of carbs they contain, as well as the calories. Not that you’re counting any of that stuff on Paleo, it’s just nice to know.
These are absolutely incredible! I have been searching for a convincing recipe ever since I had to move to a restricted diet and these really do taste like traditional chocolate chip cookies. My sweet tooth boyfriend even eats them up so fast I have to hide them from him! I couldn’t be more pleased with how they came out. This recipe is certainly a keeper :)
Hi Steve, coconut flour absolutely will not work here because it’s 3x more absorbent than almond flour. You only want to use coconut flour in recipes that call for it because it performs so uniquely. If you had to use coconut flour, you would want to use 1/3 of the amount, but I would recommend using my coconut flour chocolate chip cookies instead, which have been formulated specifically to use that kind of flour.
Move over, Doritos; there’s a new ranch chip in town and it’s actually healthy for you. These kale chips are seasoned with zesty ranch flavor from dill, garlic, and lemon juice. Plus, they’re made with only clean ingredients, unlike Doritos (hello, MSG!). Although these chips do list sugar on the ingredients panel, it only comes in at 3 grams per 1-ounce serving.
This recipe makes soft, cakey cookies that are also hearty! They held up very well in the freezer! They’re great to have on hand for the mornings when you don’t have the brain power to think about breakfast. You can just pull some out of the freezer, heat in the microwave for about 1 minute, and have a healthy delicious breakfast you and your kids will love!
This is a classic gingerbread cookie recipe Paleo-style. Yup, you could make these and decorate your tree with them and eat a few too. You could make these and give them away to your friends and neighbors if you do that sort of thing. Whatever you do with them you will have so much fun because you can actually make and eat gingerbread cookies like everyone else now. Yeah, for eating “normal” even when you are on a Paleo diet.
All types of poultry are great to include in a balanced paleo diet and are particularly valuable for those who are very active and, therefore, have higher protein needs. To ensure that the chicken you consume is as natural as possible, look for free range or organic varieties. If you’re trying to lose weight, keep in mind the fact that some cuts of chicken such as thighs contain more fat and calories than others and adjust your quality accordingly.
If all else fails, this simple rule of thumb may make it really easy to shop for paleo foods. The layout of most grocery stores is quite simple: in the inner aisles you will typically find packaged, processed foods. Things like bread, pasta, cereal, flour, sugar, etc. For the most part, many of the foods stocked in the inner aisles of a grocery store will probably be "non-paleo approved items." 

When you're eating paleo, the worst part of the day is in between meals, when a snack craving hits and all you want is a bag of chips. We're here with some good news: Lays is still off limits, but with options like Brussels sprouts chips, roasted edamame, and veggie sushi, you'll look forward to snack time again. And if you're going keto, check out out healthy keto snacks, too.
Sure, there's a bit of debate as to whether true Paleo-ers can have foods like chocolate (which is made with milk solids and sugar). As articulated on Paleo Leap, an online resource for all things Paleo, "In the true sense of whether our Paleolithic ancestors enjoyed [foods like chocolate], the answer is almost always no, but the real question we should ask ourselves is whether they are healthy when consumed in moderation." In essence, it's up to the individual to decide whether or not to include chocolate in their nutritional regime. Paleo-ers who do say yes to chocolate often choose the dark variety -- it tends to be less processed and lower in sugar.
All types of poultry are great to include in a balanced paleo diet and are particularly valuable for those who are very active and, therefore, have higher protein needs. To ensure that the chicken you consume is as natural as possible, look for free range or organic varieties. If you’re trying to lose weight, keep in mind the fact that some cuts of chicken such as thighs contain more fat and calories than others and adjust your quality accordingly.
If you just crave sweets in general (not an easy craving to fight off), you could be low in a number of nutrients, namely, sulfur. Cruciferous vegetables like broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, kohlrabi, bok choy, kale, rutabaga, collard greens, turnip (root or greens), maca, radish, and wasabi, among others, are great sources of sulfur, Vitamin C and fiber. They’re also great for fighting off cancer cells.
If you crave soda, you might be low in calcium. The best source of calcium is in your leafy greens. Make yourself a big salad out of spinach, kale, watercress, turnip greens, some broccoli, and sesame seeds. If you do dairy, throw some cheddar in there, too. Top it all off with some homemade Ranch dressing or a nice oil and vinegar dressing. This snack will not only help increase your calcium intake, it’ll also fill you up and leave no room for that soda you want to drink.
Unless you’ve been living under a (ahem, Paleolithic) rock, you’ve heard about the paleo diet. The diet may lead to weight loss in the short term, as well as lower blood pressure, controlled blood sugar, and other possible benefits. (1, 2) So it’s no surprise that this eating approach has gained popularity since the publication in 2010 of the hit book The Paleo Diet, authored by Loren Cordain, PhD, a professor emeritus at Colorado State University in Ft. Collins and the founder of the paleo diet movement.

Other than its unique stretching capabilities, tapioca flour (also interchangeably called tapioca starch) can help provide crispness to baked goods. This recipe only calls for one-half cup (60 grams) of tapioca starch, but if you were to use a greater amount of tapioca starch you could even make truly crispy and crunchy Paleo chocolate chip cookies. 

Compared to the diets we traditionally ate, today, most Western diets are deficient in plant-based nutrients. The paleo diet prescribes including a wide variety of vegetables to ensure that your body benefits from the fiber and essential vitamins and minerals that a found in this food group. However, balance is key here. The nutritional makeup of different types of vegetables varies greatly and some options, such as potatoes and squash, have a much poorer nutrition profile compared to the amount of carbs that they contain. Because of this, most paleo dieters generally recommend limiting your intake of starchy vegetables if you’re trying to lose weight.
These fig bars have a lot going on, and your taste buds are sure to thank you for such a nice midday treat. At the same time they are loaded with healthy things like apples, peaches, and the figs themselves. They’ve removed any trace of grains, and are using coconut flour to put them into bar form, with just the right amount of honey to make these sweet but not overly so. The use of cinnamon, nutmeg, and ginger really balances out the flavor profile for these, and you can eat them between breakfast and lunch, or between lunch and dinner so they’re very good to have handy.
Grass-fed meat is recommended on the paleo diet because it is leaner than meat from grain-fed animals and has more omega-3 fatty acids, the healthy fats that reduce inflammation in the body and protect your heart. A typical American diet is high in saturated and trans fats and lower in healthy poly- and monounsaturated fats, hence the paleo diet's emphasis on grass-fed meats, as well as seafood.
I’m sorry to hear these didn’t work out for you. I’m not sure what you mean by “the flour never became anything but crumbled powder.” Were you making your own almond flour, and the ground almonds didn’t become fluffy enough? Or do you mean that there wasn’t enough moisture for the cookies to hold together? I’ve made these cookies many times, and this ratio of maple syrup and coconut oil (or butter) has always produced a delicious result. You can always add additional coconut oil or maple syrup if the cookie dough doesn’t look like it will hold together. I hope you and your family have a Merry Christmas, regardless!
Sure, there's a bit of debate as to whether true Paleo-ers can have foods like chocolate (which is made with milk solids and sugar). As articulated on Paleo Leap, an online resource for all things Paleo, "In the true sense of whether our Paleolithic ancestors enjoyed [foods like chocolate], the answer is almost always no, but the real question we should ask ourselves is whether they are healthy when consumed in moderation." In essence, it's up to the individual to decide whether or not to include chocolate in their nutritional regime. Paleo-ers who do say yes to chocolate often choose the dark variety -- it tends to be less processed and lower in sugar.

Dr. Lauryn Lax is a Doctor of Occupational Therapy, Nutritional Therapy Practitioner, Functional Medicine Practitioner, author and speaker, with over 20 years of clinical and personal experience specializing in gut health, intuitive eating, food freedom, anxiety, hormone balance and women’s health. She is also a published journalist, and her work has been featured in Oxygen Magazine, Women’s Health, Paleo Magazine, Breaking Muscle, CrossFit Inc, USA Today, ABC and CBS News. She operates a virtual Functional Medicine & Nutrition practice, Thrive Wellness & Recovery, LLC, working with clients around the world to reinvent the way their body looks, moves and feels.
So – these cookies. We’ll start with a description from Mariah, who lived in the room next door to me freshman year and hasn’t lived far from me since (even in London!). She’s one of my best friends, and let me note, she does not seek out desserts that are healthy or gluten-free or Paleo or any of the other things that these cookies are. She just cares that they’re delicious.
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