Unless you’ve been living under a (ahem, Paleolithic) rock, you’ve heard about the paleo diet. The diet may lead to weight loss in the short term, as well as lower blood pressure, controlled blood sugar, and other possible benefits. (1, 2) So it’s no surprise that this eating approach has gained popularity since the publication in 2010 of the hit book The Paleo Diet, authored by Loren Cordain, PhD, a professor emeritus at Colorado State University in Ft. Collins and the founder of the paleo diet movement.
Because of the simplicity of a paleo diet, it does not require participants to do too much thinking. While calories in versus calories out is the most basic rule to weight loss, a paleo diet takes a lot of thinking out of dieting. As long as you are eating whole, nutritious foods, you will probably find that weight loss will follow naturally—mainly because this style of eating cuts calories automatically.

Because it came from an animal, practically all meats are paleo. However, it’s important to look for meats that are as natural as possible. This means that on the paleo diet you should opt for grass fed, wild-caught and organic varieties. Not only do these have a superior nutritional profile, they’re also less likely to be full of harmful preservatives, antibiotics, steroids and pesticides which are commonly added to animal feed. You’ll also want to avoid meats that have been highly processed such as hot dogs, spam and lunch meats. The added preservatives, flavor enhances and sugar in these foods have been linked to increased risk of developing cancer and heart disease.
Make and chill the cookie dough. In a large bowl, place the 1 1/2 cups of almond flour and 1/2 cup tapioca flour, or 1 2/3 cup almond flour and 1/4 cup coconut flour), salt, baking soda, and sugar, and whisk to combine well. Create a well in the center of the dry ingredients, and add the coconut oil, eggs, and vanilla and mixing to combine. Add the chocolate chips to the cookie dough, and mix until the chips are evenly distributed throughout the dough. Both varieties of the dough will be soft but the almond flour/coconut flour combination will be softer than the almond flour/tapioca starch combination. Cover the bowl and place in the refrigerator for at least an hour and up to 2 days.

The basics of Paleo apply to Whole30: eat whole, unprocessed foods; avoid legumes, grains, and dairy (although Whole30 does allow ghee or clarified butter). Things that may be acceptable in a Paleo diet but not in Whole30 include alcohol, any form of sweetener, any legume-derived ingredients (including soy lecithin in packaged foods), and pseudo-grains such as quinoa. Whole30 also frowns on recreating grain foods, such as pancakes or muffins made with coconut flour or other grain alternatives, during the 30-day regimen.
Don’t let the green color fool you, these also taste good in addition to being good for you. They contain pistachios, pumpkin seeds, coconut, orange juice, and help seeds, so you know you’re getting plenty of flavor along with the nutritional features of each of these items. The green color comes from the use of spirulina, which adds even more nutrients to the mix. These are raw, so they require no baking which means you mush all of the ingredients together into bar form, let them chill, and they’re ready to eat.
Perfect! I added pecans to your recipe and they came out perfect. The only issue I have is controlling myself so I don’t eat them all at once. I used butter instead of coconut oil and erythritol + molasses instead of coconut sugar to create my diabetic version of your cookie. I also added chopped pecans. Mmm-mm! Thanks. This is the best low-carb cookie recipe I’ve found.

These 100% grass-fed beef sticks were featured in Paleo Magazine’s Best of 2014 list, and not without a good reason. This low-carb snack boasts high levels of B vitamins, vitamins A and E, and CLA, which is known for its cancer- and stomach fat-fighting properties. They also come in four taste bud pleasing flavors: original, jalapeno, summer sausage, and garlic summer sausage.

Although it sometimes gets the name “caveman diet,” paleo eating is right in line with the kind of ingredients Whole Foods Market has always championed: fresh, high-quality real foods. There are no absolute rules, but an emphasis on lean meats and seafood, fruits and veggies, and nuts and seeds is at the heart of paleo. Try these tips for navigating shopping and meal planning.
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