One other thing to note here is that I pre-make some of these ingredients, which takes time, but at least it’s not taking time in the middle of the day when I’m trying to work or rush out the door. Also, I don’t mind eating food cold. I know a lot of people can’t stomach the idea of eating cold meat, although that really confuses me because Subway makes billions of dollars every year selling cold meat. Anyway, you can always heat these things up at work or home. And without further ado…
Gluten is a protein found in things like rye, wheat, and barley. It’s now being said that much of our population may be gluten-intolerant (hence all the new “gluten-free!” items popping up everywhere).  Over time, those who are gluten intolerant can develop a dismal array of medical conditions from consuming gluten: dermatitis, joint pain, reproductive problems, acid reflux, and more.[2]

Health.com is part of the Meredith Health Group. All rights reserved. The material in this site is intended to be of general informational use and is not intended to constitute medical advice, probable diagnosis, or recommended treatments. All products and services featured are selected by our editors. Health.com may receive compensation for some links to products and services on this website. Offers may be subject to change without notice. See the Terms of Servicethis link opens in a new tab and Privacy Policythis link opens in a new tab (Your California Rightsthis link opens in a new tab)for more information. Ad Choicesthis link opens in a new tab | EU Data Subject Requeststhis link opens in a new tab

Similarly, any foods that were not easily available to Paleolithic humans are off-limits in this diet, Holley explains. That means processed foods — many of which contain added butter, margarine, and sugar — should not be a part of the paleo diet. The same goes for dairy, which may not have been accessible to Paleolithic humans, and legumes, which many proponents of the diet believe are not easily digestible by the body.
The Paleolithic Prescription: A Program of Diet & Exercise and a Design for Living by S. Boyd Eaton, M.D., Marjorie Shostak and Melvin Konner. This book, published in 1988, was the start of the Paleolithic diet movement. Its recommendations are not in line with what today is considered a paleo diet, as whole grain breads and pastas, legumes and some low fat dairy products are allowed. However, it is still a profoundly important book. Used books are available for a reasonable price.
Pork rinds usually get the reputation of being the ultimate form of junk food, but you have to remember that most junk food is junk because it is deep fried in unhealthy oils, and made up of ingredients that act as filler rather than anything that is natural. Here they’re using real pork and frying it up in coconut oil so you’re getting a healthy version of this notorious snack. They even show you how to throw together your own Cajun seasoning so you can make that whenever you’re in the mood of Cajun spiciness.
Fattening cattle with corn changes the lipid balance and is clearly not the natural diet for a grass eating cow. In Simple change in cattle diets could cut E. coli infection researchers have found that when cattle were fed hay or grass for just five days before slaughter, much less E. Coli cells were present in the animal's feces and virtually all surviving E. coli bacteria were not acid-resistant and were killed by human stomach acid.

Chris Masterjohn has Cholesterol: Your Life Depends on It!, another web site pointing out that the war on cholesterol and the push to put people on statins is misguided. The site argues it is actually polyunsaturated fats, not saturated fats or cholesterol, that contribute to heart disease, cancer, liver damage, and aging. He also has a popular blog.
The NY Times had a blog article on Good News on Saturated Fat which is reporting on Gary Taubes's interpretation of the new report in The New England Journal of Medicine on a two-year diet experiment in Israel. A followup is the post The Fat Fight Goes On where Gary rebuts the arguments against the study. And here's a good interview with Taubes (and includes a good summary): Gary Taubes on Cold Fusion, Good Nutrition and What Makes Bad (and Good) Science.
Grass-fed beef is often highlighted on the diet, which is promoted to contain more omega-3 fats than conventional beef (due to being fed grass instead of grain). It does contain small amounts of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), a precursor to EPA and DHA. However, only a small proportion of ALA can be converted in the body to long-chain omega-3 fatty acids (EPA and DHA). The amount of omega-3 is also highly variable depending on the exact feeding regimen and differences in fat metabolism among cattle breeds. [3] In general, the amount of omega-3 in grass-fed beef is much lower than that in oily marine fish. [3] Cooked salmon contains 1000-2000 mg of EPA/DHA per 3-ounce portion, whereas 3 ounces of grass-fed beef contains about 20-200 mg of ALA.
Apple chips are a classic paleo snack that can be found at almost any grocery store. However, if you want to make them at home, you do not need a huge food dehydrator to get perfectly crispy apple chips. This recipe shows you how to turn your favorite variety of apples into crunchy chips with the help of your oven, and the light seasoning gives the apple chips a bit of added flavor. Try eating them with your favorite paleo-friendly sweet dip.
The Raw Paleo Diet & Lifestyle site is a resource created by members of the Raw Paleolithic Diet community for people looking to improve their health by choosing a more historically natural approach to diet, fitness and lifestyle. They have two forums: Raw Paleo Forum. It has some activity. And Raw Paleo Diet, or RVAF Raw Veg and Animal Foods Group, a forum for followers of semi-RPD diets, (such as Aajonus Vonderplanitz's Primal Diet/Weston-Price Diet/Sally Fallon/Instincto) and followers of the NeanderThin/Paleo/Stefansson Diets, who, for health reasons, wish to pursue a more fully Raw, Paleolithic variation of those diets.
These “cookies” are actually made from thinly sliced apples that are topped with heaping servings of tasty paleo treats. This paleo snack recipe does not require any cooking or refrigerating times, so it is a very fast treat that can be made on the go. If you do not follow a version of the paleo diet that allows legumes, the peanut butter in this recipe can easily be substituted for tahini or almond butter. The toppings are also extremely easy to customize to your individual tastes.
There are plenty of fantastic paleo snack recipes available for dips but it can be hard to find a tasty, crunchy cracker to eat along with all those dips. These crackers have a mild flavor that works well with sweet or savory spreads, but they are also absolutely delicious on their own. Incredibly easy to make,  the recipe is so versatile that you can create crackers of any size or shape. You can also spice them up by including fresh herbs or cheese in the crackers. Interesting, easy and delicious- this recipe is a keeper!
Chocolate chip cookies have been one of the most popular snacks for decades, so it is no surprise that many people new to paleo eating are desperate to find paleo snack recipes for chocolate chip cookies. The balance of almond flour and coconut oil in this recipe really helps to hold the cookies together and keep them moist. This recipe perfectly mimics the taste appearance, and texture of everyone’s favorite gooey chocolate chip cookies.

I wrote a book called The Paleo Solution which went on to become a New York Times Bestseller. This book incorporates the latest, cutting edge research from genetics, biochemistry and anthropology to help you look, feel and perform your best. I am a research biochemist who traded in his lab coat and pocket protector for a whistle and a stopwatch to become one of the most sought after strength and conditioning coaches in the world. With my unique perspective as both scientist and coach you will learn how simple nutrition, exercise and lifestyle changes can radically change your appearance and health for the better.


With a very simple shift we not only remove the foods that are at odds with our health (grains, legumes, and dairy) but we also increase our intake of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. Here is a great paper from Professor Loren Cordain exploring how to build a modern Paleo diet: The nutritional characteristics of a contemporary diet based upon Paleolithic food groups. This paper also offers significant insight as to the amounts and ratios of protein, carbohydrate and fat in the ancestral diet.
Sometimes nothing but a giant cookie will do. There’s no need to turn on the oven or share when it comes to this Paleo dessert. Coconut and almond flours bring the fiber, while a scoop of protein powder and your favorite nut butter add a whole lot of (you guessed it!) protein. Add in your favorite cookie mix-ins, like nuts or dairy-free chocolate chips, for a cookie your body will thank you for eating.

These dogs are not actually hot dogs, but are Cajun spiced sausages. You wouldn’t want to eat hot dogs on Paleo because it’s not in line with the Paleo philosophy, even though it does seem to be a meat item. Paleo is about getting back to natural foods, which is why you want to make sure you choose high quality ingredients at all times. These mini dogs have plenty of cauliflower to make them a complete meal, but because of their smaller size they are best used as a snack. They provide a few different dipping options, which it’s always nice to have a choice.

×