Autoimmunity is a process in which our bodies own immune system attacks “us.” Normally the immune system protects us from bacterial, viral, and parasitic infections. The immune system identifies a foreign invader, attacks it, and ideally clears the infection. A good analogy for autoimmunity is the case of tissue rejection after organ donation. If someone requires a new heart, lung kidney or liver due to disease or injury, a donor organ may be an option. The first step in this process is trying to find a tissue “match”. All of us have molecules in our tissues that our immune system uses to recognize self from non-self. If a donated organ is not close enough to the recipient in tissue type the immune system will attack and destroy the organ. In autoimmunity, a similar process occurs in that an individuals own tissue is confused as something foreign and the immune system attacks this “mislabeled” tissue. Common forms of autoimmunity include Multiple Sclerosis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Lupus, and Vitiligo to name only a tiny fraction of autoimmune diseases. Elements of autoimmunity are likely at play in conditions as seemingly unrelated as Schizophrenia, infertility, and various forms of cancer.
The Paleo Diet Cookbook: More than 150 recipes for Paleo Breakfasts, Lunches, Dinners, Snacks, and Beverages by Loren Cordain. Also contains two weeks of meal plans and shopping and pantry tips. Helps you lose weight and boost your health and energy by focusing on lean protein and non-starchy vegetables and fruits. Note that this is a very low-fat book and is being marketed as such. Published December 7, 2010.
Instead of just eating broccoli raw, you can add it to a batter to make delicious broccoli feta fritters. Feta cheese and red pepper flakes add a Mediterranean flair to these fritters while broccoli provides a massive amount of Vitamin C to these healthy treats. This unique recipe purees broccoli before mixing it together with paleo-friendly flour and frying it. The resulting fritters are chewy without falling apart and they taste great when topped with hummus or another paleo dip. Make a big fritter and server it as a main meal like a veggie burger! 

It is not quite lunch and it is not quite dinner. You have already had breakfast hours ago but you are still craving something…anything! It is that dreaded time of day when you just need a snack. But what can you have? Eating a paleo diet is tricky enough when planning your main meals but now you also need to consider what to eat in between meals. This may seem like a daunting task at first but it is not as hard as you may think!
Paleo eating requires a lot of planning, prep time, and mental resolve. For instance, eating out on the diet isn't as simple as ordering chicken and a salad. Think: In what oil was the chicken cooked? Did any of the salad toppings come processed, canned, or packaged? "As with every elimination diet, it's just not doable long term," Dr. Ochner says. While weight loss is far from the sole purpose of eating paleo, going on and off of the diet can lead to big weight swings. Any yo-yo diet starts in weight loss from both muscle and fat, and usually ends with weight gain of all fat, which contributes to a slower metabolism and increased insulin resistance.
Grass-fed meat is recommended on the paleo diet because it is leaner than meat from grain-fed animals and has more omega-3 fatty acids, the healthy fats that reduce inflammation in the body and protect your heart. A typical American diet is high in saturated and trans fats and lower in healthy poly- and monounsaturated fats, hence the paleo diet's emphasis on grass-fed meats, as well as seafood.
You’ll stay pretty full on the Paleo diet. Nutrition experts emphasize the importance of satiety, the satisfied feeling that you’ve had enough. You shouldn’t feel hungry on this diet – protein and fiber are filling, and you’ll get plenty of both. One small study of 29 participants published in Nutrition & Metabolism in 2010 found Paleo dieters felt just as full but consumed fewer calories than their Mediterranean counterparts.
Banana peppers are really great because they give you a bit of spice but not so much as to be overpowering. When you stuff them with salami you are pretty much getting equal parts meat and vegetable, making this very Paleo. But they didn’t stop there, they stuffed the salami with avocado, so you’re getting a huge nutrition boost as well as a third texture to make this really nice on the palate. The avocado will provide you with a good dose of potassium, as well as fiber to help with digestion. A fine snack choice that will easily get you to your next meal.
Edible seaweeds are too often overlooked on a Paleo diet, but they boast an unparalleled nutritional profile. Among many essential nutrients, most kinds of seaweeds are loaded with iodine, an essential trace element to life. Iodine is especially important for the proper functioning of the thyroid gland. For most people on a SAD diet, the only reliable source of iodine is iodized salt. Many people on a Paleo diet decide to shun added salt completely or to consume unrefined sea salt instead of regular iodized table salt. This is great, but with such a change, an effort should be made to eat iodine rich foods occasionally. Seaweeds are a great option.
Even people who hate kale will be converted after giving this recipe a try. Baking the kale in the oven removes the slightly bitter taste and makes the kale crispy. The key to getting enough crunch in your kale chips is to make sure the leaves are completely dry before you coat them in olive oil- any moisture will prevent that crunch! This basic recipe just seasons them with salt and pepper but cheese, chili powder, or vinegar can be added to make them taste just like your favorite chip flavor.

These make a great snack because they have a lot going on. There’s sweet potato in them, so you’ve got fiber built into them. They’ve also cut out all grain, using almond meal and coconut flour instead. The sweetness comes from honey, not from the coconut because the coconut is unsweetened. These aren’t sweet enough to be considered a dessert, and they’re billed as supplying energy thanks to the sweet potato they contain. Sweet potato is great as a snack because it is digested slowly and releases energy over a longer time period.

Sweet, bright lemon bars are the perfect snack for a warm sunny day, but most lemon bars are made with boxes of premade cake mix that definitely is not paleo. This recipe keeps the traditionally gooey topping while using honey and coconut flour to make a crust that follows paleo guidelines. Since these paleo lemon bars only require five ingredients, they are certain to become a classic paleo snack that anyone with a sweet tooth will love (and those not on a paleo diet will love them too!).
If you were to eat an unlimited amount of red meat (which the paleo diet technically allows), you may see your heart health suffer. While experts applaud the omission of packaged and processed foods like cake, cookies, chips, and candy — which are well known to be bad for your ticker — they’re not crazy about the fact that paleo doesn’t allow you to eat whole grains, legumes, and most dairy. Whole grains in particular have been linked with better cholesterol levels, as well as a reduced risk of stroke, obesity, and type 2 diabetes. (13) These are all comorbidities of heart disease. (14)
Deadly Harvest: The Intimate Relationship Between Our Health and Our Food by Geoff Bond. The author is a nutritional anthropologist who has for years investigated both foods of the past and our prehistoric eating habits. Using the latest scientific research and studies of primitive tribal lifestyles, Bond first explains the actual diet that our ancestors followed--a diet that was and still is in harmony with the human species. He then describes how the foods in today's diets disrupt our biochemistry and digestive system, leading to health disorders such as allergies, arthritis, cancer, diabetes, heart disease, osteoporosis, obesity, and more. Most important, he explains the appropriate measures we can take to avoid these diseases--and even beat them back--through healthy eating. The conclusions of Deadly Harvest are that disease control happens by eating a strict low-glycemic diet, lowering the percentage of body fat you carry around, eat a diet consisting of mostly non-starchy plant-based foods, eat a low-fat diet with ample amounts of omega-3 fats, maintain good colon health, engage in regular physical activity, get some daily sunshine, and reduce chronic stress. If you do this, then diseases like cancer, heart disease, digestive problems, allergies, autoimmune diseases, brain diseases, diabetes, and obesity can be avoided. The Amazon reviews average to 5 stars.
A strict paleo diet does not allow dairy products because hunter-gatherers did not milk cows. Some paleo dieters say dairy is OK, especially if it is grass-fed because grass-fed butter, for example, has more omega-3s. Fermented dairy products are also OK for some paleo eaters because they have a lower content of lactose and casein, the two concerns paleo dieters have with dairy.
For many years Arthur De Vany Ph.D. has been writing a book called Evolutionary Fitness on "What Evolution Teaches Us About How to Live and Stay Healthy." The diet he follows fits into my core diet definition. He may have been the first one to use the paleo diet to maximize fitness. His current site is Art's Blog on Fitness, Health, Aging, Nutrition and Exercise [archive.org].
Pork rinds usually get the reputation of being the ultimate form of junk food, but you have to remember that most junk food is junk because it is deep fried in unhealthy oils, and made up of ingredients that act as filler rather than anything that is natural. Here they’re using real pork and frying it up in coconut oil so you’re getting a healthy version of this notorious snack. They even show you how to throw together your own Cajun seasoning so you can make that whenever you’re in the mood of Cajun spiciness.
Fried pickles are the ultimate state fair food but sadly the cornmeal and flour breading used in most fried pickles is not paleo. Most paleo recipes for fried pickles create a heavy, doughy coating that quickly loses its crunch, but this recipe provides the perfect substitute. The secret is to mix equal amounts of almond meal and tapioca starch to create a coating that quickly turns brown and crispy after being fried in coconut oil.
Unlike real fudge, you do not need to carefully labor over a stove with a candy thermometer to create this deliciously sweet treat. Instead, all you have to do is mix together tahini with a few other ingredients before freezing it and then you’re done! The ground sesame seeds create a smooth base for the fudge and they are also a great source of iron and calcium. This fudge is a great way to satisfy your sweet tooth quickly while sticking to the paleo diet.
Maroon: White Sweet Potato – Blackberries – Raspberries – Lemon Juice – Coconut Butter – Pink: Strawberries – Orange: Carrots – Oranges – Orange Sweet Potato – Yellow: Parsnips – Lemon – Green: Spinach – Pears – Kiwis – Peas – Avocado – Indigo: Blueberries – Vanilla – Burgundy: Beets – Cherries – Vitamix 750 – Nesco Food Dehydrator – Excalibur Food Dehydrator
Even if you’re not purely Paleo, boiled eggs should be a part of your diet for so many reasons. Not only are they super easy to cook (12 minutes on the stove on average with no mixing or stirring), but eggs are filled with proteins, vitamins, minerals, and good fats. Plus one large egg has only about 80 calories. Boiled eggs can even be found at the grocery store precooked and in packs of two, making it a great grab-and-go Paleo snack. If you’re not a fan of the hardboiled variety, try one of these egg-tastic breakfast cooking tips that we promise you’ll love.
These make a great snack because they have a lot going on. There’s sweet potato in them, so you’ve got fiber built into them. They’ve also cut out all grain, using almond meal and coconut flour instead. The sweetness comes from honey, not from the coconut because the coconut is unsweetened. These aren’t sweet enough to be considered a dessert, and they’re billed as supplying energy thanks to the sweet potato they contain. Sweet potato is great as a snack because it is digested slowly and releases energy over a longer time period.
Apple chips are a classic paleo snack that can be found at almost any grocery store. However, if you want to make them at home, you do not need a huge food dehydrator to get perfectly crispy apple chips. This recipe shows you how to turn your favorite variety of apples into crunchy chips with the help of your oven, and the light seasoning gives the apple chips a bit of added flavor. Try eating them with your favorite paleo-friendly sweet dip.
Avocados make a great snack all by themselves, but they can be a little bland sometimes, and this is a great way to doll them up so they’re even tastier. This uses Greek yogurt, which is a fermented form of dairy and considered acceptable by some following the Paleo plan. Others see it as dairy is dairy and don’t eat it, so it’s up to you to decide if you want to incorporate a bit of fermented dairy like Greek yogurt into your diet or not. The rest of the recipe is just a bit of seasoning to help the avocado out in the flavor department.
This single serving snack manages to taste like a decadent dessert while still being entirely healthy. This cookies and cream dip is good on slices of fresh fruit, but it is so tasty that some people just eat it with a spoon! It can quickly be whipped together from applesauce, protein powder, and a few other paleo foods that most people have in their cabinets, so it is the ideal snack for when midnight sugar cravings suddenly strike.
When people hear the word diet, they often think of all the yummy foods they undoubtedly have to give up. But Go Raw is the exception. Founded on the principle of a raw-based diet, Go Raw offers organic and vegan snacks that taste good, like their Paleo cookies that come in unique flavors, including ginger snap and lemon pie. While these may not be your warm, gooey homemade chocolate chip cookies, they definitely satisfy a sweet tooth.
Adoption of the Paleolithic diet assumes that modern humans can reproduce the hunter-gatherer diet. Molecular biologist Marion Nestle argues that "knowledge of the relative proportions of animal and plant foods in the diets of early humans is circumstantial, incomplete, and debatable and that there are insufficient data to identify the composition of a genetically determined optimal diet. The evidence related to Paleolithic diets is best interpreted as supporting the idea that diets based largely on plant foods promote health and longevity, at least under conditions of food abundance and physical activity."[35] Ideas about Paleolithic diet and nutrition are at best hypothetical.[36]
Hi Claudia, unfortunately, more almond butter won’t thicken the bars the way that coconut flour will. You *might* be able to use almond flour, but proceed with caution since almond flour is MUCH less absorbent than coconut flour. Start with 3/4 cup almond flour and experiment until you get the consistency you like (basically, they should be thick and dense enough to cut through.) So sorry to hear about your possible allergy to coconut. 🙁 Big hugs. xo
This is the perfect paleo snack recipe for a people who crave pumpkin spice flavorings on each cozy fall day. The mixture of pumpkin puree and coconut flour creates extremely moist, flavorful dessert bars that hold together instead of falling apart when sliced. This recipe only requires one bowl and an oven to make, so these tasty paleo pumpkin bars can be quickly thrown together anytime you need to make a sweet treat. You definitely need to make them in the fall when pumpkin is in season!
One of the things that people miss the most when they first start trying to follow the paleo diet are classic, greasy,  french fries from fast food restaurants. This recipe is the perfect nutritious substitute. The mildly sweet flavor of carrots makes a tasty fry and carrots are also packed with vitamin A and other nutrients. Since these carrot fries are baked instead of deep fried, they are low in calories while still being crisp and crunchy. An all-around win!
The digestive abilities of anatomically modern humans, however, are different from those of Paleolithic humans, which undermines the diet's core premise.[4] During the 2.6-million-year-long Paleolithic era, the highly variable climate and worldwide spread of human populations meant that humans were, by necessity, nutritionally adaptable. Supporters of the diet mistakenly presuppose that human digestion has remained essentially unchanged over time.[4][5]
We love nuts and they are decidedly paleo diet friendly. Be careful though, as cashews are high in fat and, for some reason, it’s incredibly easy to eat an entire jar of them in one sitting (that’s not just us, is it?). If you’re trying to lose weight, limit the amount of nuts you’re consuming. Otherwise, have at it. I mean, you can’t beat a good almond/pecan/walnut mix, can you?
Paleoista: Gain Energy, Get Lean, and Feel Fabulous With the Diet You Were Born to Eat by Nell Stephenson. Paleoista is not only a how-to book, it is also a glimpse into the life of a woman who gives advice on how to eat this way, and lives the life, day in and day out. The author's websites: NellStephenson.com Nutrition & Fitness and Paleoista.com. To be published May 1, 2012.
Avocados are a fantastic source of healthy fats so they have always been one of the top paleo foods. Most people just slice up avocado and serve it raw (simple and tasty), but avocado can actually be delicious when it is cooked for a brief period of time. This recipe creates a crushed pork rind coating for long slices of avocado that are then baked in the oven. The resulting treat has a salty, crunchy coating and a soft, creamy interior. A perfect fry for those who crave that crunchy, salty taste of a regular French fry.
[…] I don't like the word "diet", so I'll say that this is more a way of changing what you eat long-term. It's all based around what our ancestor hunter-gatherers would have eaten, and what we've evolved to be able to process and absorb. The very basic level of it, is that you don't eat carbohydrates, processed meats or sugars, and cut out dairy products. You instead eat plenty of fresh meat, fish, vegetables, fruits and nuts. You can still have oil, provided it's natural – so coconut, peanut & olive oil are all good. The good thing is that you're also allowed to take this to your own level – so if you want a couple of days off a week – say, weekends, you can do it & it will still be a lot healthier for you. This is a really helpful site I've used to make a note on my shopping list of what's allowed: The Ultimate Paleo Diet Food List | Ultimate Paleo Guide […]

Avocados make a great snack all by themselves, but they can be a little bland sometimes, and this is a great way to doll them up so they’re even tastier. This uses Greek yogurt, which is a fermented form of dairy and considered acceptable by some following the Paleo plan. Others see it as dairy is dairy and don’t eat it, so it’s up to you to decide if you want to incorporate a bit of fermented dairy like Greek yogurt into your diet or not. The rest of the recipe is just a bit of seasoning to help the avocado out in the flavor department.


Vitamin D is the one supplement that would be paleo. At least it would be for those of us that don't live outside year round. You can have your D level measured. The low RDAs only prevent definable deficiences, not problems that take a long time to develop. Michael Holick, MD is a leading writer on this subject. This is a 10 page PDF: Vitamin D: importance in the prevention of cancers, type 1 diabetes, heart disease, and osteoporosis and its companion Sunlight and vitamin D for bone health and prevention of autoimmune diseases, cancers, and cardiovascular disease [change PDF to 100% to read]. Or if you prefer, there is an hour video on YouTube.
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