This could be the perfect trail mix. It’s full of crunch from a variety of nuts, sweetness from coconut flakes and banana chips and just the right amount of chocolate to curb those cravings. It comes together right in the slow cooker, so your kitchen will smell amazing! Be sure to use coconut oil or ghee instead of butter here to keep it strictly Paleo.
Traditional french fries are something you’ll have to give up on Paleo, but this version has enough modifications to it that you can eat them as a replacement. They’re made from jicama, a food that is potentially better for you than potatoes, although Paleo purists would still want to avoid the whole french fry situation altogether. These are cooked up in coconut oil, one of the approved Paleo oils, and are using grass-fed cheese. They even show you how to make the sauce for the top.
Furthermore, following a low to moderate carbohydrate diet can make exercise a physical battle for those following the Paleo diet. During aerobic exercise (longer exercises such as running, biking, swimming and walking), our bodies use carbohydrates for fuel. Without adequate carbohydrates in the diet, our body turns to both body fat and muscle for energy. This results in the breaking down of muscle mass, which is known to increase our metabolism and help us burn more calories per day. Feelings of physical fatigue and exhaustion, throughout the day and during exercise, can be signs of muscle breakdown.

If you’re a big fan of chips, you’ll be happy to know that you don’t have to give them up when following the Paleo diet.  While you may not be able to incorporate your favorite brands from childhood or run by the convenience store for a quick snack bag, fruit and veggie chips are a much healthier and lighter alternative.  Although you can find pricey bags of these types of chips at most grocery stores today, the ingredient list can be questionable.  Compared to the equivalent, make-at-home fruit and veggie chips will provide your body with energizing nutrients.  Here are some recipes for chips that you can feel good about eating:


"Snacks can seem like a challenge," when you go paleo, admits registered dietitian Sonya Angelone, a spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. That's why you should keep the ingredients for these quick and easy paleo snacks on hand. Because TBH, even if cavemen didn't eat snacks, well, they also wielded clubs on the regular, so things are just different now.
In addition, no statement on this website has been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration, and any product mentioned or described on this website is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. If you purchase anything through a link on this website, you should assume that we have an affiliate relationship with the company providing the product or service that you purchase, and that we will be paid in some way. We recommend that you do your own independent research before purchasing anything.
Sometimes nothing but a giant cookie will do. There’s no need to turn on the oven or share when it comes to this Paleo dessert. Coconut and almond flours bring the fiber, while a scoop of protein powder and your favorite nut butter add a whole lot of (you guessed it!) protein. Add in your favorite cookie mix-ins, like nuts or dairy-free chocolate chips, for a cookie your body will thank you for eating.
One part of the Paleo dieting philosophy is to not feel like foods are forbidden, but rather to cut them out because they’re not good for you. This means that all of the pre-packaged snack foods for sale should be trumped by snacks you make for yourself out of natural foods. Luckily Paleo-inspired cooks and chefs have been hard at work coming up with delicious and interesting ways to get your snack on, so enjoy!
These delicious snack bites are similar to muffin but the filling is slightly more dense. Instead of using flour, the snack bites get their texture from a blend of bananas and sweet potatoes. The basic recipe just relies on the natural sweetness of the bananas and sweet potatoes for flavoring, but you can add more sweetness with some honey. You can even jazz up the recipe more by using dried fruit, dark chocolate chips, or chia seeds as a mix-in. This flexible recipe is fantastic!
Fruit snacks and roll-ups (i.e. fruit leather), often packed as additions to a child’s lunch box or provided as an afternoon snack, can be anything but a fruit-based snack.  Often packed with simple sugars and void of dietary fiber, fruit snacks may not seem like a healthy snack to incorporate as part of a Paleo diet, but it is easy to cut out excess sugar when you make your own fruit snacks or roll-ups from scratch.  These “real” and natural fruit-based goodies make a delicious sweet snack when you are craving sugar.  Great to have on hand for both yourself and children, take a peek at these tasty recipes that may soon become a staple in your Paleo pantry:
Here’s a three-ingredient kebab combo that’s great to prep ahead of time (and trust us, they keep well enough in the fridge for a next-day snack). Cut chicken breasts into cubes and marinate in Tessemae’s Lemon Garlic Dressing for 1-3 hours. Thread cubes onto a skewer and grill for about 15 minutes, then garnish with fresh parsley. No extra sauce needed.
Pumpkin seeds are one of the healthiest seeds you can eat, and making them taste as good as they can means you’ll be more inclined to eat them, and therefore more likely to benefit from the nutrients they contain. This recipe uses real jalapenos to deliver the heat, and keeps things elegant by only using the requisite number of ingredients to get these to taste right. For example, there’s olive oil, which is used to help roast the seeds, but it also helps the paprika and salt stick to the seeds so you get flavor on each one.
"Loren Cordain's extensive research demonstrates how modern westernized diets drastically depart from the original diet humans consumed for millions of years. In The Paleo Diet and The Paleo Diet Cookbook, Dr. Cordain shows how diets high in grains, dairy, vegetable oils, salt, and refined sugars are at odds with our genetic legacy and then shares his uncomplicated strategy for losing weight and getting healthy."
Evolution of the Human Diet: The Known, the Unknown, and the Unknowable by Peter S. Ungar. Diet is key to understanding the ecology and evolution of our distant ancestors and their kin, the early hominins. A study of the range of foods eaten by our progenitors underscores just how unhealthy many of our diets are today. This volume brings together authorities from disparate fields to offer new insights into the diets of our ancestors. Paleontologists, archaeologists, primatologists, nutritionists and other researchers all contribute pieces to the puzzle. The book has four sections: Reconstructed diets based on hominin fossils--tooth size, shape, structure, wear, and chemistry, mandibular biomechanics. Archaeological evidence of subsistence--stone tools and modified bones. Models of early hominin diets based on the diets of living primates--both human and non-human, paleoecology, and energetics. Nutritional analyses and their implications for evolutionary medicine.
Of course Wikipedia has a page on the Paleolithic Diet. It is quite thorough. It also isn't clear about the lean/fatty meat debate between the followers of Loren Cordain and a slew of others, and pushes lean meat. It is weak on the variations of the diet. Then it restricts fermented beverages. Even butterflies eat fermented fruit. Why wouldn't our paleo ancestors also?
My children love these and they don’t even care that they are eating something healthy. I like to make 2-3 pans of them and save them for later. They can be eaten just like potato chips if you want to. These zucchini chips are a great snack but they can also be a great side dish vegetable for dinner. Just don’t cook them until they’re crispy. I cook mine for about half an hour for a side dish. Sometimes I like them without all the spices so I just leave out the curry powder and garlic powder. I also think they are best when I use Course Real Salt.
The New Evolution Diet: What Our Paleolithic Ancestors Can Teach Us about Weight Loss, Fitness, and Aging by Arthur De Vany. Art is the grandfather of the "Paleo Lifestyle" movement. The plan is built on three principles: (1) eat three meals a day made up of nonstarchy vegetables, fruits, and lean proteins; (2) skip meals occasionally to promote a low fasting blood insulin level; and (3) exercise less, not more, in shorter, high-intensity bursts. Note that the book is anti-fat. All oils are to be avoided, though canola is considered okay for higher temperatures. Egg yolks are to be skipped now and then. Published December 21, 2010.
These yummy snacks are similar to a bite-sized meatball but they have far less calories. Not only is the zucchini in these poppers nutritious but it also helps the poppers to remain juicy and flavorful as they cook in the oven. Since they are baked instead of fried they are healthy and making the chicken and zucchini poppers is easy and mess-free. You can serve them with salsa, guacamole, or another one of your favorite paleo friendly dips.

Saturated fat has been demonized by our health authorities and media. What is the basis for this position on Saturated fat? Are current recommendations for VERY low saturated fat intake justified? How much saturated fat (and what types), if any should one eat? Without a historical and scientific perspective these questions can be nearly impossible to answer.

Eat generous amounts of saturated fats like coconut oil and butter or clarified butter. Beef tallow, lard and duck fat are also good, but only if they come from healthy and well-treated animals. Beef or lamb tallow is a better choice than lamb or duck fat. Olive, avocado and macadamia oil are also good fats to use in salads and to drizzle over food, but not for cooking. For more information, have a look at our beginner’s guide to Paleo and fat.
Buried in the middle of The Revised Metabolic Oncolytic Regimen for Effecting Lysis in Solid Tumors one can find their diet recommendations for tumor control. It has a paleo diet orientation. Protein is 35%, preferably Omega 3 rich. Carbohydrates (also 35%) are only vegetables and fruit, no beans, bread, potatoes, or any grain. Then dietary and supplemental forms of fat should provide 20-30% of (daily) calories.
Fast forward 15 years later and I live in my own house with air conditioning and I make the rules. 🙂 But even though I still turn the oven on to bake in the summer (I just have to some days! Hello, it’s my job.) I still have the notion that summertime = no ovens. So I’m always looking for healthy treats to make that don’t require the oven or much effort.
Apple chips are a classic paleo snack that can be found at almost any grocery store. However, if you want to make them at home, you do not need a huge food dehydrator to get perfectly crispy apple chips. This recipe shows you how to turn your favorite variety of apples into crunchy chips with the help of your oven, and the light seasoning gives the apple chips a bit of added flavor. Try eating them with your favorite paleo-friendly sweet dip.
Joel Runyon is the founder of Ultimate Paleo Guide and CEO of Paleo Meal Plans. He's a precision nutrition, and Gym Jones Level 1 certified, and helped millions of people get healthy and lose weight since 2012. Joel is also an ultra runner and endurance athlete - and in 2017, he became the the youngest person to run an ultra marathon on every continent in the world to build 7 schools with Pencils of Promise in developing countries.Follow him on Twitter, Instagram, Athlinks and read his full bio here.
The mild sweetness of beet roots seems like it would make the ideal oven-baked chip but many people struggle to achieve the right texture on these chips. This paleo snack recipe shows you how to get the beets to release some moisture before baking so they get crunchy without becoming burnt and bitter. You can use both red and gold beet chips with this recipe to create a snack that is both beautiful and delicious. You’ll be a beet lover soon enough!
Avocados make a great snack all by themselves, but they can be a little bland sometimes, and this is a great way to doll them up so they’re even tastier. This uses Greek yogurt, which is a fermented form of dairy and considered acceptable by some following the Paleo plan. Others see it as dairy is dairy and don’t eat it, so it’s up to you to decide if you want to incorporate a bit of fermented dairy like Greek yogurt into your diet or not. The rest of the recipe is just a bit of seasoning to help the avocado out in the flavor department.
Anyone who has ever eaten a lox bagel or a sushi bagel roll knows just how tasty salmon and cream cheese are together. Creamy and salty just can’t be beat! Instead of an unhealthy, carb-packed bagel, this recipe uses thin slices of cucumber that are topped with salmon and other tasty ingredients, and goat cheese cream cheese provides a creamy flavor that works well with the dill and onion included in the recipe.
"Loren Cordain's extensive research demonstrates how modern westernized diets drastically depart from the original diet humans consumed for millions of years. In The Paleo Diet and The Paleo Diet Cookbook, Dr. Cordain shows how diets high in grains, dairy, vegetable oils, salt, and refined sugars are at odds with our genetic legacy and then shares his uncomplicated strategy for losing weight and getting healthy."

There are plenty of fantastic paleo snack recipes available for dips but it can be hard to find a tasty, crunchy cracker to eat along with all those dips. These crackers have a mild flavor that works well with sweet or savory spreads, but they are also absolutely delicious on their own. Incredibly easy to make,  the recipe is so versatile that you can create crackers of any size or shape. You can also spice them up by including fresh herbs or cheese in the crackers. Interesting, easy and delicious- this recipe is a keeper!
A big soft pretzel slathered in butter, cinnamon and sugar, mustard, or cheese sauce is the ultimate guilty pleasure. These paleo pretzels are so healthy that you can snack on them without ruining your diet- how is that possible?!. Cassava flour and coconut sugar are used to create a pretzel that is the ideal blend of soft and chewy. However, be aware that these pretzels may harden up after they get cold so they are best when served right out of the oven (don’t worry, you won’t have a hard time eating them all!).
Eat low to moderate amounts of fruits and nuts. Try to eat mostly fruits low in sugar and high in antioxidants like berries as well as nuts high in omega-3, low in omega-6 and low in total polyunsaturated fat like macadamia nuts. Consider cutting off fruits and nuts altogether if you have an autoimmune disease, digestive problems or are trying to lose weight faster.
Anything that comes in a box, jar, or bag should be avoided on the paleo diet—as should anything that just wasn't consumed back then. That means no grains, dairy, added salt, or legumes (including peanuts, beans, lentils, and soybeans), according to Robb Wolf, a former research biochemist, paleo expert, and author of The Paleo Solution. While potatoes are generally outlawed on the diet, Wolff says they are okay to eat sparingly as long as you earn them through exercise (more on that next). Alcohol and honey are also generally considered paleo no-nos, but red wine tends to be the closest option there is to a paleo drink, and honey is far preferred to table sugar or artificial sweeteners.
You’ll lose weight because any time you restrict entire food groups, your calorie intake tends to be lower, Sandon says. And whenever you burn more calories than you consume, you'll have weight loss, she says. (2) The focus on lean protein, fruits, and vegetables over calorie- and sodium-rich processed foods can also contribute to weight loss, though she also points out that the paleo diet wasn’t created to be a weight loss diet. (3)

Instead of just eating broccoli raw, you can add it to a batter to make delicious broccoli feta fritters. Feta cheese and red pepper flakes add a Mediterranean flair to these fritters while broccoli provides a massive amount of Vitamin C to these healthy treats. This unique recipe purees broccoli before mixing it together with paleo-friendly flour and frying it. The resulting fritters are chewy without falling apart and they taste great when topped with hummus or another paleo dip. Make a big fritter and server it as a main meal like a veggie burger!
This is the perfect paleo snack recipe for a people who crave pumpkin spice flavorings on each cozy fall day. The mixture of pumpkin puree and coconut flour creates extremely moist, flavorful dessert bars that hold together instead of falling apart when sliced. This recipe only requires one bowl and an oven to make, so these tasty paleo pumpkin bars can be quickly thrown together anytime you need to make a sweet treat. You definitely need to make them in the fall when pumpkin is in season!
Bridget Hastings Komosky MS, RD, CD-N is a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist. She completed her Bachelor of Science degree in Nutrition at Ithaca College and her Master of Science degree in Clinical Nutrition at New York University. She completed her dietetic internship at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital in New York, NY. Her work in eating disorders includes a six month fellowship at NewYork- Presbyterian Hospital and New York Psychiatric Institute, employment as a dietitian on the inpatient eating disorder unit at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, and now as a dietitian at Walden Behavioral Care since October 2013. Currently at Walden, Bridget works with the adult and adolescent Partial Hospitalization Programs and the Binge Eating Disorder Intensive Outpatient Program. She also has a private practice.   

Both kids and adults will enjoy stretching the honey into taffy, and the longer you stretch the honey, the easier and more pliable the taffy becomes. To avoid a sticky situation, make sure any surface you set the taffy on is thinly coated with cooking spray. You can also wear latex gloves (coated with canola oil) to make the pulling a little easier.
Indian food is typically plant-based so it is no surprise that many Indian classics can be used to create tasty paleo snack recipes. Samosas are traditionally a floury flatbread filled with a savory filling but a quick switch from wheat flour to almond flour makes them the ideal paleo snack. These tasty little samosas have a sweet potato filling but you could also fill them with a mixture of meat or pureed pine nuts.
The Paleo diet includes nutrient-dense whole fresh foods and encourages participants to steer away from highly processed foods containing added salt, sugar, and unhealthy fats. However, the omission of whole grains, dairy, and legumes could lead to suboptimal intake of important nutrients. The restrictive nature of the diet may also make it difficult for people to adhere to such a diet in the long run.  More high-quality studies including randomized controlled trials with follow-up of greater than one year that compare the Paleo diet with other weight-reducing diets are needed to show a direct health benefit of the Paleo diet. Strong recommendations for the Paleo diet for weight loss cannot be made at this time.
This chipotle-infused dip is going to be spicy, but not so spicy that your eyes water. It’s balanced out by the butternut squash, which has a nice calming effect on the taste buds. There’s also thyme, cinnamon, and chili powder adding to the mix of flavors here, making this a multidimensional dip that is great for carrot sticks, raw broccoli pieces, strips of bell pepper, or any of the chip recipes found on this page. They also mention that apple slices works as a good dipping tool for this particular dip.
Eggplants are Paleo friendly for most, but store-bought baba ghanoush can still contain loads of hidden mayo—and that can mean unwanted vegetable oils. Go for a simple, mayo-free recipe with lots of garlic and a squeeze of lemon juice for a fresher take that won’t weigh you down. Try pairing this dip with some Paleo-friendly homemade rosemary sesame crackers.
LOREN CORDAIN, Ph.D., is one of the top global researchers in the area of evolutionary medicine. Generally acknowledged as the world's leading expert on the Paleolithic diet, he is a professor in the Health and Exercise Science Department at Colorado State University. Dr. Cordain and his research have been featured on Dateline NBC and in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and other media. He is the author of The Paleo Diet and The Paleo Diet Cookbook, among other books, and makes regular media and speaking appearances worldwide.
×