I just came across this recipe as I am venturing into the Paleo world, as well as looking for recipes for my daughter who has really bad eczema and is off dairy, eggs (whites), wheat and soy. Do you think an egg replacer would work OK in this recipe? I’ll probably give it a try with the replacer I got from Whole Foods, but was wondering if anyone had already tried this recipe without eggs? I don’t know if ghee will work for her if she has to be dairy-free. Would coconut oil work the same? Thanks for any help/input! 🙂
I accidentally forgot mine when my “timer” didn’t remind me. I remembered it and pulled it out after it had been in the oven an extra 13 minutes. It was almost perfect. I also just whisked vigorously as my processor is missing since the last move. I will definitely make it again, but I will likely play with it a bit as I am hoping to find a few versions to make regularly to replace my family’s usual bread. Even our most finicky eater is loving these recipes so far. Thank you!
This came out better than I expected it to actually. I did not have coconut flour so I added an extra 1/4c of almond meal. It was a tad bland but other than that a nice bread. I think the coconut flour would add to its flavor and sweetness. I will try again and add a banana just to give it a little more flavor. the pan I used was a regular loaf pan and it was a bit thin but otherwise a nice bread. My daughter enjoyed with peanutbutter and banana mashed together and I had it with her egg salad.
Jazzmin, you are correct and the active cultures in the yogurt will not survive during baking. However, the reason why I mentioned those facts about yogurt on my post is because a lot of people following a paleo diet simply won’t eat dairy because at one point dairy was classified as “not paleo”. There are so many amazing health benefits from eating fermented foods and raw, organic dairy from pasture raised animals that I feel it is important to educate people.
I found this recipe after buying Paleo Bread at Wholefoods. It was SO bad that it drove me to find a good recipe to make my own. When I read the review that it wasn’t too eggy, I was sold. I am not a huge fan of eggs (too bad for someone attempting a primal diet) so I was set to try this. I followed the directions exactly…even taking extra time to beat the eggs. I used the yoghurt instead of coconut cream. It came out perfect. Thank you for making something edible and still Paleo. I tried to give this recipe 5 stars but it’s having a glitch and won’t let me. 5 stars!!!
Today I accidentally used besan (chickpea or garbanzo flour) and again, it came out great. I had forgotten that the almond flour was in the fridge and not the cabinet. I was wondering what was going on when the dough was much more sticky, was slightly darker, and smelled differently. I realized my mistake, cooked it anyway, and now have an acceptable substitute for almond flour. I think I like the almond better, but will enjoy this loaf anyway.
Hi Kim, thank you for your feedback. I think it’s interesting that the recipe turned out well using coconut flour instead. I would love it if you could post a photo of your bread here in the comments so I can see it. Substituting coconut flour for almond flour is tricky, and I think it worked out for you because you cut the amount of flour added in half.
I used the right sized pan after reading further into the blog it was the almond flour I used it was almond meal/flour. I went to one of your preferred sites and ordered flour from there. I am new to this type of baking so I am learning as I go. Do you have the nutritional breakdown of this bread printed somewhere? I am not seeing it on the recipe.
Thank you so much for this recipe. I haven t had bread since starting Paleo about 3 1/2 months ago. Then my husband asked me to make him Zucchini Blueberry Bread, which I find irresistible. I made his bread last night then found this recipe. I made it today. I added some shredded zucchini and a handful of blueberries to it. It appeared done after 90 seconds but had a raw section inside. So I simply microwaved it a little more. It was absolutely delicious. Thanks again.
I didn’t measure my pan but when I baked this bread it was a bit flat also, so I cut the loaf in half, and then sliced each half into bread sized pieces. It worked perfectly for full sized pieces that looked like ‘normal’ bread. I cannot get over how easy and delicious this bread is. My sweet son can have no grains, and no honey….so I left out the honey and added 1 tsp of xylitol. So so good. And this morning when I toasted a piece for him, he thought I made a mistake and gave him ‘real’ bread!
Just took this bread out the oven….YUM! I didn’t have arrowroot powder or cornstarch, so I substituted that for gluten-free all-purpose flour, and it came out amazing. I also substituted a the whole flax-seed with rolled oats, added 2 tbs of chia seeds (I wanted a high protein bread) The only thing I would add: 1tbsp of honey to cut a bit of the overly savory-taste. I used a 9″x4″ loaf pan, so my bread unfortunately isn’t sandwich bread height, but what can I do to fix that?? Just use a smaller pan or make more to fill out the volume better? I know others have asked the same question, but the only solution I saw, and felt was reasonable, was to make 1.5x the amount of mix….has anyone tried this? I was wondering if anyone has tried to use 2 whole eggs and 2 whites instead of 4 whole eggs….any insight as to how this would change the bread?
I have a question for you about eggs. Do you have any particular size or volume of “egg” that you tend to use in your recipes? In most of my cookbooks, an “egg” means a medium sized egg that yields about 50mls by volume, so there are slightly more than 5 eggs in a cup. I tend to buy extra large eggs locally, and I find that when a recipe calls for more than 3 eggs, the end result is quite “egg-y.” I’m going to experiment, but perhaps you would be able to tell me if there is a size or volume of egg that you tend to use in your recipes. (I didn’t see anything specific under the “ingredient” menu on your blog.)

I finally had a chance to try this receipe yesterday. I liked the taste, but for some reason it did not rise very much. When I put all of the batter in the pan(yes, I used recommended pan), it filled only half of the pan, and after baking, it stayed almost at almost the same level. The baking soda was not old(bought 1 month ago). Does anyone know what I might have done wrong? I whisked the ingredients, instead of using food processer. Could it be a reason? Or was it because I used regular flax seed grounded by muself?
Whenever I come across a recipe and I want to convert it to grams I use the amount on say my bag of almond flour and calculate it out. My almond flour weighs out to be 112 grams per cup so for this recipe you would use 224 grams of almond flour (I use superfine Kirkland brand from Costco and I’ve also used Bob’s Red Mill superfine and they both work equally well). The 2 tablespoons of coconut flour is a small amount so I wouldn’t bother weighing that out. As for the flax seed, I buy mine whole and measure accordingly and grind in my coffee grinder.

Whether you're living the paleo lifestyle or you're just looking for some new and fun recipes, these easy desserts are a great way to satisfy that sweet tooth. Not only are these treats considered paleo, but they're also fast, simple, and totally delicious. With chocolate recipes, be sure to pick a dark chocolate, the darker the better. And as a general guideline, stay away from granulated sugar and instead opt for natural sweetners like coconut sugar, agave, or raw honey, all of which are paleo-approved. 


I’ve never left a review before, but can’t help myself because this gluten-free bread is to die for (figuratively). Although, I did make a couple of adjustments because I’m allergic to tree nuts and sensitive to coconut products. In place of almond flour I made my own cashew flour (added raw cashews to food processor and let run until as fine as I could get it without it turning into butter). I substitute the coconut solid for Spectrum Organic Palm Oil shortening. I was worried that it would taste eggy with 4 eggs, but went ahead and used 4 eggs and YEAH — not eggy tasting (to me). P.S. Cashews nuts is not a tree nut, it’s a legume.
This must be so challenging and stressful for you, but know that young children can be very picky eaters. Typically young children like very bland, slightly sweet tasting foods, so I can see why he would like an almond butter and honey sandwich. If you can find a grain free bread that looks like the bread he likes to eat, use one slice of regular and one slice of grain-free (keeping the grain free on the bottom). And/or as he is resistant to grain free bread at this time, maybe focus on introducing other foods that he may enjoy such as cucumber, red pepper or apple slices, small pieces of cooked chicken or sweet potato and serve these with a side of almond butter to dip them into. Try introducing grain free crackers, cookies or muffins as well as paleo smoothies (into which you can sneak some greens), keep the portions small and offer him variety alongside his sandwich. He may also like the entire routine of meals and may enjoy the same meal at the kitchen table or in his highchair, so maybe packing a picnic and eating at the park might help him to try some new flavors. I hope these suggestions help, keep us posted on how things go.

You’ll stay pretty full on the Paleo diet. Nutrition experts emphasize the importance of satiety, the satisfied feeling that you’ve had enough. You shouldn’t feel hungry on this diet – protein and fiber are filling, and you’ll get plenty of both. One small study of 29 participants published in Nutrition & Metabolism in 2010 found Paleo dieters felt just as full but consumed fewer calories than their Mediterranean counterparts.
Similarly, any foods that were not easily available to Paleolithic humans are off-limits in this diet, Holley explains. That means processed foods — many of which contain added butter, margarine, and sugar — should not be a part of the paleo diet. The same goes for dairy, which may not have been accessible to Paleolithic humans, and legumes, which many proponents of the diet believe are not easily digestible by the body.
A more traditional minimalist shoe is a moccasin. Footear by Footskins has a line of them. The are available in a variety of soles, e.g. crepe soles (shoe-like with a heal), rubber soles (more flexible), molded soles (thinner and more lightweight but still suitable for outdoors), and leather canoe softsoles (for mostly indoor use). For more see What Are The Main Differences In Your Soles? The moccasin uppers come in a leather choice of deerskin or cowhide. Deerskin is more flexible and is the preferred material to achieve the barefoot equivalent. I bought a pair for around the house as pictured here. I found it cheaper to buy through Amazon.com. See moccasins by New and Bestselling for: Men's and Women's.
What did I do wrong? This came out VERY moist… like a banana bread. Nothing like loaf/sandwich bread. I did end up cooking it nearly 31 minutes because pick still wasn’t coming out clean. Mine seems much darker too. I didn’t use the flax seeds (daughter has a sensory issue with nuts/seeds in breads) (You’ll notice I put sesame seeds on half for me…would that make it that much different? I used the proper size – but glass pan (all I have in loaf style) Flavor is good… but far too dense to consider using for a sandwich and not sure how Biikeweaver got 18 servings (!?) from this size loaf pan? But THANK YOU for posting. This was my FIRST attempt, so I’ll try again!
In general, the paleo diet involves eating nutrient-rich real foods, such as meat, fish, nuts, eggs, vegetables, and fruits. It’s best to choose grass-fed and pasture-raised meats, and organic produce whenever possible. The paleo lifestyle removes refined sugars, grains, legumes, dairy, and unhealthy fats and oils from your diet, as well as highly processed foods. (Read more about the paleo diet on HealthLine and EatingWell.)
The last thing I can think of is the brand of almond flour you’re using and how you’re measuring your ingredients. Not all brands of almond flour are good for baking. Some are coarser and more oily then others, and this can affect the texture of baked goods. I always recommend people to use the same ingredients as I list below the recipes so that there’s no fail. If you can’t find the brands of almond flour I recommend, maybe you can order it online. My favorite brands are by Honeyville, Welbee’s and Nuts.com. Honeyville is now sold at Costco. Let me know if this helps.

One question, when I released this bread out of the pan there was a very strong ammonia smell coming from the bread. After it cooled this ammonia smell was gone. I’m just curious what could cause that odor? Is it a reaction from the almond flour? I was just caught off guard when I bent over to get a whiff of the freshly baked loaf and it smelled of ammonia!

Alcohol is a no-no if you are strict paleo. Beer is made from grains, and liquor also contains traces of gluten. But, good news for cider-lovers: most hard ciders are gluten-free, so they are allowed. Check the label to be sure. Red wine is more accepted in the paleo community because it contains the antioxidant resveratrol, but sorry chardonnay lovers, white wine is technically not allowed.
I just made this recipe and it was AMAZING! I used almond meal (because I just made almond milk a few days ago, so the “meal” was what I had left over). It came out so moist, light and fluffy….not dense at all! Do you think it would freeze well? What would happen if I only put 3 eggs in? Have you tried less eggs? Thanks for posting such a great recipe!

But the Paleo diet bans more than just highly processed junk foods—in its most traditional form, it prohibits any kind of food unavailable to stone age hunter–gatherers, including dairy rich in calcium, grains replete with fiber, and vitamins and legumes packed with protein. The rationale for such constraint—in fact the entire premise of the Paleo diet—is, at best, only half correct. Because the human body adapted to life in the stone age, Paleo dieters argue—and because our genetics and anatomy have changed very little since then, they say—we should emulate the diets of our Paleo predecessors as closely as possible in order to be healthy. Obesity, heart disease, diabetes, cancer and many other "modern" diseases, the reasoning goes, result primarily from the incompatibility of our stone age anatomy with our contemporary way of eating.
Jazzmin, you are correct and the active cultures in the yogurt will not survive during baking. However, the reason why I mentioned those facts about yogurt on my post is because a lot of people following a paleo diet simply won’t eat dairy because at one point dairy was classified as “not paleo”. There are so many amazing health benefits from eating fermented foods and raw, organic dairy from pasture raised animals that I feel it is important to educate people.
Thank you so much for your recipe. This is the best keto bread recipe I have come across. There is only one suggestion it’s better to use medium size 8X4 inch pan to get perfect size slices. There is one question., can we replace coconut flour with almond flour completely? If yes what is the quantity for almond flour in this case? Thank you once again.

The Stone Age Diet: Based on in-depth studies of human ecology and the diet of man by Walter L. Voegtlin. This was self-published back in 1975. Only a couple hundred copies were printed and distributed to friends and relatives. No one knew the book existed until some years later. In no way is he the father of the paleo diet. It is impossible to purchase. Apparently his descendents are planning a reprint, though the book is poorly written and not based upon factual anthropological information that even was available then. We have put up his Functional and Structural Comparison of Man's Digestive Tract with that of a Dog and Sheep. And a PDF can be found here.

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