Food and Western Disease: Health and nutrition from an evolutionary perspective by Staffan Lindeberg (MD at Lund University in Sweden) is the newest book promoting the paleo diet. It covers the link between diet and disease in the Western world (all major diseases, including cancer, heart disease, obesity, stroke and dementia) and towards a greater knowledge of what can be defined as the optimal human diet. Benefits and risks are detailed. The Amazon reviews are all 5 stars. Especially read Susan Schenck's detailed review. You can read a preview at Google Books


The Sugar Addict's Total Recovery Program by Kathleen DesMaisons. While this isn't really a paleo book, it does point out issues with the foods we aren't eating. The books claims the excessive processed sugar consumed is responsible for "mood swings, depression, fatigue, fuzzy thinking, PMS, impulsivity ... [and] unpredictable temper." She says her research shows indulging in sugar highs should be treated much more seriously, akin to heroin or alcohol dependency, because sugar causes spikes in the neurotransmitters serotonin and beta-dopamine just like those drugs.
Some Paleo dieters emphasize that they never believed in one true caveman lifestyle or diet and that—in the fashion of Sisson's Blueprint—they use our evolutionary past to form guidelines, not scripture. That strategy seems reasonably solid at first, but quickly disintegrates. Even though researchers know enough to make some generalizations about human diets in the Paleolithic with reasonable certainty, the details remain murky. Exactly what proportions of meat and vegetables did different hominid species eat in the Paleolithic? It's not clear. Just how far back were our ancestors eating grains and dairy? Perhaps far earlier than we initially thought. What we can say for certain is that in the Paleolithic, the human diet varied immensely by geography, season and opportunity. "We now know that humans have evolved not to subsist on a single, Paleolithic diet but to be flexible eaters, an insight that has important implications for the current debate over what people today should eat in order to be healthy," anthropologist William Leonard of Northwestern University wrote in Scientific American in 2002.
Hi Paola, just tried your bread recipe yesterday. I proofed my dough in a Brod & Taylor proofing box at 88F for one hour. My dough rose, but not by much, not by 100%. I used Bob’s Redmill Fine Almond flour but might change to Anthony’s or King Arthur Flour super fine almond flour because my bread came out similar to a brick. Should I let my dough rise for more than one hour? Thank you Paola….love your site and recipes and think you are a genius!!
Hi I’m just trying this recipe for the first time. I’m currently proving my dough, but was a little confused at one point in the instructions. As I’m not much of a baker I really wasn’t sure what to do, after mixing the wet ingredients with an electric mixer. Was I meant to continue to put flour and sour cream in with the electric mixer, or switch to manual mixing? Or should I have used a dough hook? That seems to be a gap in the instructions, perhaps assuming that the reader will know what to do, but I really didn’t!

Hello, this bread recipe looks great, and I really want to make it for my dad who is intolerant to gluten and must settle with the sad and tiny store bought gluten free loaves. However, the only bread pan I have is one inch larger in dimensions, do you recommend increasing the recipe? Like doubling it or using 1.5 times the ingredients? Thank you :)
I’m so sorry your bread crumbles, that’s so disappointing. That your dough didn’t become a firm ball indicates that a measurement might have been off. My best recommendations for baking grain-free include having all ingredients at room temperature, have the oven preheated, to measure everything accurately and to notice if things are happening the way they are supposed to, ie.: your dough is not firm. A soft dough would need you to add more flour to it, although if the dough is too soft because too much milk or fat was added, it will throw off the balance of everything else. Baking is very precise in this way, try it again and keep me posted on the outcome.
I don’t know what i’m doing wrong with this bread. I’ve made it a few times as i like how it tastes toasted but it will not cook properly in the center. Every time i cook it i end up cooking it for another 30mins longer then the recipe requires and it’s still coming out moist in the center. You could not use it without toasting put it that way. Could it be because i’m using Canned coconut milk as opposed to yogurt? I’ve tried continuing to cook with foil over the top once the outside starts to look well done so the inside can keep cooking too.
Trick And Treat - how 'healthy eating' is making us ill by Barry Groves. The author is one of the world's most outspoken proponents of a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet. This book is an account of how and why the health-care establishment has got the concept of 'healthy eating' so wrong. Whereas Taubes work (see above) is a fairly straight forward review of the existing science, Groves expands into the politics of medical research and treatment to a much greater extent. "Trick and Treat" is divided into two parts. Part One describes the corruption in the health industry, points out the problems inherent in a high-carb, low-fat diet, and then prescribes a diet that leads to good health. The prescribed diet is high in fat - specifically animal fat, not polyunsaturated vegetable fat - and low in carbohydrates, with 60-70% of calories from fat, 15-25% of calories from protein, and a mere 10-15% of calories from carbohydrates. Part Two describes numerous diseases the author claims are the result of high carbohydrate consumption. These range from life-threatening disorders such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer to less serious problems such as acne, near-sightedness and dental problems. The Amazon reviews average to 4+ stars.

Hi Faith, I make a similar bread almost every day (from the Plant Paradox Cookbook), and it calls for full fat coconut milk…it works great as well. I will try your apple cider vinegar today, as the recipe I’ve been using calls for red wine vinegar. Thanks so much for posting, and thank you for the Arrowroot substitution…sometimes it can be a challenge to find! :-D


I pinned your first roll recipe, but when I tried to go back to it – had disappeared. So because I make it often, repinned it. I noticed this time palm oil had been removed. I always used coconut oil instead. Anyway – just wondered why and if there is a difference in texture? I went ahead and added coconut oil because I’ve been so happy with the way I’ve been making them. (They slide out of pan which I like, with oil) One of my favorite and go to recipes – the only bread I eat. Thanks.
Finally made this recipe, is my second bread recipe I’ve made and the top is nice but the inside always feels moist … I am putting it in the oven a bit more to see if it dries out, is that the texture that it should have because of the butter or what? I liked the flavor! Just not sure of how is supposed to be inside. I haven’t watched the video yet. Thanks!!
In his 1988 book "The Paleolithic Prescription," Eaton and his co-authors argued that humans are ill-suited to modern diets because the large part of a human's genetic makeup was established thousands of years ago in pre-agricultural societies. Eaton and other advocates of the Paleo diet believe that many modern diseases are a result of today's eating habits.

Nourishing Traditions: The Cookbook that Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and the Diet Dictocrat by Mary G. Enig, Ph.D. and Sally Fallon. The premise is the culinary traditions of our ancestors, and the food choices and preparation techniques of healthy nonindustrialized peoples, should serve as the model for contemporary eating habits. However, they push whole grains and dairy, which aren't Paleolithic.
Hi there, it’s Lacey! I’m the editor and main writer for A Sweet Pea Chef. I'm a food blogger, health and food coach, professional photographer, and mommy of three. I also run the awesome free Take Back Your Health Community, am the healthy and clean weekly meal planner behind No-Fail Meals, and a little bit in love with Clean Eating. Be sure to check out my free beginner’s guide to eating clean and follow me on YouTube and Instagram to get my latest recipes and healthy eating inspiration. Read More…
Some Paleo dieters emphasize that they never believed in one true caveman lifestyle or diet and that—in the fashion of Sisson's Blueprint—they use our evolutionary past to form guidelines, not scripture. That strategy seems reasonably solid at first, but quickly disintegrates. Even though researchers know enough to make some generalizations about human diets in the Paleolithic with reasonable certainty, the details remain murky. Exactly what proportions of meat and vegetables did different hominid species eat in the Paleolithic? It's not clear. Just how far back were our ancestors eating grains and dairy? Perhaps far earlier than we initially thought. What we can say for certain is that in the Paleolithic, the human diet varied immensely by geography, season and opportunity. "We now know that humans have evolved not to subsist on a single, Paleolithic diet but to be flexible eaters, an insight that has important implications for the current debate over what people today should eat in order to be healthy," anthropologist William Leonard of Northwestern University wrote in Scientific American in 2002.
photo sources: cavemen elephant hunt, caveman cooking over fire, cavemen hunt paleo bear, milk truck logo, darth vader vendor, storm trooper tomato, lego cook, chef and lego pig, lego explorer, lego muffin, lego bread and carbs, frozen caveman grok lego, lego clock, lego caveman forging for food, caveman with wheel, darth vader and ostrich lego, easing into water lego, lego man with pasta
For the dry bits, I would use a flour sifter or a sieve depending on what you have in the kitchen. Adding in the wet would require a spoon. The food processor simply takes out the labor of mixing it by hand. I haven’t made this one yet (tomorrow I will) but I’ve made banana bread more times than I can remember and only once has it been done in a food processor.
First things first. And this is of utmost importance. Woot Woot is STILL cool. Says me. Because I say it all the time, so it just HAS to be cool, right?! Wait, since I’m the most uncool person on the planet, you probably should stop saying woot woot immediately. 😉 Second, I had ZERO clue you used to be an almond butter-making maniac! Oh I wish I was your bestie during THAT fun phase of your life! Now you are just a no-bake brainiac! (<– see what I did there?). These bars are FAB, just like all the rest of your no-bake bars! They look super creamy and uber dreamy… and most dangerous, because who in the world could eat just one (or 5) of these babies?! SO GOOD! Pinned of course! Cheers, sweets! And haaaaappy Galentine's Day!! XOXOXOX
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