Hi, I have just put this loaf into the oven, but mine never reached a pouring consistency. It was a thick dough which I was able to spread in the loaf pan only with the greatest difficulty. The only changes I made were omitting the arrowroot, as I didn’t have it – I followed your notes for that exactly, increasing the tapioca to 4 tablespoons and adding an extra egg white. I used de-fatted almond flour, which should not account for the dryness of the mixture – I actually had to leave out half a cup of the dry moisture, because it was already so doughy. Any idea what went wrong?
I didn’t read through all 400+ comments, so I don’t know if this has been discussed, but this recipe calls for a really huge amount of baking soda and doesn’t have the huge amount of acidic ingredients needed to balance it. I tried it anyway as written and sure enough, the resulting product smells and tastes like un-neutralized baking soda. Normally a recipe like this would use baking powder, so I tried again, using 1.5 tsp of baking powder instead of the baking soda. I eliminated the vinegar, since its main role would be to neutralize (some of) the baking soda.
Hi, I just made these this morning. I substituted gelatin eggs for real eggs. I baked them on a cookie sheet—but next time I will put them on parchment paper because they did stick some. I also forgot the baking powder. I baked them for 20 mins. They were crunchy on the outside and gooey in the middle, but still delicious!! I also put them in the toaster after they came out of the oven. I would really love to come up with AIP recipe for these, because they are so darn good!! I probably could have gotten away with just one gelatin egg as well. I will have to experiment—-but if you come up with anything AIP in the future, please let us know! I love your blog!!
This was fantastic!! I didn’t have coconut flour, flax meal or apple cider vinegar. I made due with regular white distilled vinegar, coconut cream powder (happened to buy some at the Filipino store last night.) I did add about a 1/4 cup of Truvia baking sugar, maybe it wasn’t even a 1/4 cup; I didn’t measure. It came out so good. Moist and springy like a sponge cake. Now I can have my bread!! Thank you so much!

Just made this, thank you for the recipe! My loaf pans were too wide so I used 6 Texas size muffin tins and they came out great. I used maple syrup instead of honey because, well, I live in Vermont and my husband sugars. I am fairly new to Paleo and I’ve been an avid baker for decades-I miss baking! I will experiment with this recipe for sure, using it as a base. The first thing I am imagining is lemon poppy seed and baking them in mini muffin tins. Or baking in a cast iron skillet in the oven like corn bread. And maybe a morning glory version. Oooh my world just opened up.
This is such an excellent versatile recipe and definitely my favorite gluten-free bread recipe. I find that I’m perfectly satisfied using almond meal that of almond flour. And it has adapted well to any other kind of nut or seed meal I have tried so far. Last week I used all pecan meal is my favorite today taste wise. I also often mix half of another nut meal with half almond meal. Second favorite was half almond meal with half sunflower seed meal the taste was delicious. However the sunflower seed meal did turn green like I did read. . . Morning I may Kallof with all walnut meal and I’m sure it will turn out cause of all the work you did in creating this recipe. Also I never use a food processor I mix it all by hand and it still turns out.
Baking with almond flour can sometimes be tricky and not all brands give you the same results. Actually, the one you cited is my least favorite and usually makes baked goods sink in the middle, get very dense and also crumbly. I highly suggest you use one of the brands of blanched almond flour I recommend. My favorites are by Honeyville, Welbee’s and Nuts(.com). Here’s Welbee’s on Amazon for $23 for 2 LB http://amzn.to/1M5cDzG
I always wondered what the heck are the 7 layer bars ingredients that make the layers of these tasty bars. Turns out that regular Seven Layer Bars have a graham cracker crumb base and are topped with some combination of nuts, chocolate chips, white chocolate, butterscotch, and coconut.  All that is usually held together by sweetened condensed milk. If you’re thinking, “Oh my goodness, that’s a lot of sugar!” You’re right.  If you’re thinking, “Wow, that sounds amazing,” then you’re right as well! 

The NY Times had a blog article on Good News on Saturated Fat which is reporting on Gary Taubes's interpretation of the new report in The New England Journal of Medicine on a two-year diet experiment in Israel. A followup is the post The Fat Fight Goes On where Gary rebuts the arguments against the study. And here's a good interview with Taubes (and includes a good summary): Gary Taubes on Cold Fusion, Good Nutrition and What Makes Bad (and Good) Science.
this bread is fabulous! i made it in a larger bread pan, making the loaf a bit short. . . Next time, i’ll use a pyrex bread pan (smaller) so that the loaf is a bit taller. Wondering if i could make 1.5 of the recipe for a taller loaf in my bigger pan. . . so many things to try. Oh and my kids loved it! They thought it was banana bread even though it isn’t really sweet, i think the texture gave them that impression. I am thinking i could use this as a base for a yummy banana bread, adding a banana or two. I’ll let you know if i try that.
I just put this bread together and I think something is missing in the ingredients? It did not “pour” into bread pan as recipe suggests, it was more like a crumbly dough. I went over my steps again and again and can’t find any steps or measurements I missed. Has anyone made this yet? I have it in the oven any way as I’m not very good at figuring out what to do, so I hope it turns out! Elana, I am truly enjoying your almond flour cook book and your website is so inspiring! Thanx!
Hello, this bread recipe looks great, and I really want to make it for my dad who is intolerant to gluten and must settle with the sad and tiny store bought gluten free loaves. However, the only bread pan I have is one inch larger in dimensions, do you recommend increasing the recipe? Like doubling it or using 1.5 times the ingredients? Thank you :)
Hi Synaca, thanks for your feedback! I don’t think your bread sunk in the middle because you substituted tapioca. This was probably from the almond flour you used that may have been more coarsely ground. If the particles in the flour are larger, the ingredients won’t bind properly. Try sifting the flour before you measure the amount you need to remove those larger chunks. Another thing to consider is the temperature in your oven. Do you have an oven thermometer? Please let me know when you make it again and how it turns out.
I’ve made these twice now. First time – subbed coconut oil for the palm shortening – simply because I didn’t have any. Only had one egg so used a “chia” egg as well. Baked them in ramekins. Turned out wonderful!! Second time – baked them this morning – needed an “muffin” for my egg/kale breaky. This time used “tenderfake” – lard – again no palm shortening – used 2 real, free range, organic eggs. Baked them in standard muffin tins – once again – turned out beautifully! Especially when toasted 🙂
Thank you so much for your recipe. This is the best keto bread recipe I have come across. There is only one suggestion it’s better to use medium size 8X4 inch pan to get perfect size slices. There is one question., can we replace coconut flour with almond flour completely? If yes what is the quantity for almond flour in this case? Thank you once again.
According to the CDC, cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death in the United States. Interestingly however, our Paleolithic ancestors and contemporarily studied hunter-gatherers showed virtually no heart attack or stroke while eating ancestral diets. The references below will explore these facts to better help you understand the heart-healthy benefits of a Paleo diet.
Ohhhh! Almond flour and coconut flour! I love it. I have made bread with just coconut flour, and love the texture, but find it too sweet. The almond flour bread I love the taste, but it’s a bit dry. This recipe sounds like a great match. I can’t wait to try it. Thanks for working so hard to find such amazing recipes and then sharing them with the world!
Melted ice cream dripping down the side of your arm from a classic ice cream sandwich can really bring back some old childhood memories…along with a sugar rush, followed by an extreme crash. Instead, go for these Paleo cookie sandwiches that nix all the fake sugar. We choose the simple Paleo Vanilla Bean Ice Cream but there are two other delicious choices if you’re feeling like some extra flavor!
Wendy, I’m just a grandma, who has not experienced your issues, but I wonder what else your son eats. does he eat apple sauce? try making a bread with coconut flour, eggs and let him add apple sauce to it. the apple sauce will provide sweetness, the coconut flour is said to offer more of a normal bread consistency, the eggs bind the coconut flour together. remember that coconut flour is VERY absorbent. you only need a little. I’m going to suggest microwave muffins in a cup so you don’t have to make so much only to have him reject it. here is a sample recipe for you to try.
It took a month or so, but I finally decided to start playing around with adding a few other paleo-friendly starches, like arrowroot and tapioca. That’s what it took for me to come up with what I consider to be the perfect loaf. I had been holding out on adding other starches because I wanted to keep my ingredient list minimal, but really, these additions make all the difference in the end result of this bread.
I made this last night and it turned out great! I used Bob’s Red Mill almond flour which I know you don’t usually recommend and subbed 1/8 cup chia seed for the flax because that’s what I had on hand and it worked well. We’ve had grilled cheese and peanut butter sandwiches so far. My son is autistic and a very picky eater, and sometimes we have a hard time getting him the protein he needs so this recipe helps a lot. Thanks, Elana!
I made this tonight and used 1.5 cups almond flour, 1/2 cup tapioca starch, subbed chia meal for flax meal, subbed avocado oil for coconut oil, and added 1.5 T caraway seeds to give it a bit of a “rye bread taste”. We had it with corned beef tonight and it was very good. I did two mini loafs which took the same amount of cooking time. My husband and older son are usually very picky about paleo breads and they both gave it a thumbs up… I think because they both like the taste of caraway. Thanks for the recipe!
Love this bread!! I subbed ground salba seeds (chia) for the flax meal and it turned out great. (1/4 cup of salba seeds made 1/2 cup of salba meal) Also subbed using date sugar and coconut crystals for the honey and that worked fine. I did this to reduce glycemic impact/carbs by half. (I thought about leaving it out, but was afraid it was in there to counter the vinegar taste)
Julian Bakery made Paleo Bread™ to fulfill the craving for bread while you are living a Paleo lifestyle free from processed foods. Paleo Bread utilizes the highest quality ingredients.  This bread provides the protein and fiber your body needs to satisfy hunger while helping your body to perform at its peak.  We love The Paleo Bread and hope you do too!
— HOW I WORK IT: I am 10 years into maintaining my 35 lb weight loss, and it continues to be a conscious effort. Right now the best way I am able to include Elana’s recipes into my post-weight-loss and weight-maintenance life is by following the gaps diet, which includes hearty soups as the basis for eating, filled in by some nut baked goods. Enjoy!

Hi Elana…I did this with your bread and it was ridiculously tasty!!! Herb roasted tomatoes on top of your Paleo bread spread with a little leftover chevre that I’d rolled in some Creole seasoning. I LOVE this bread (well, and all of your recipes really)!!! Thank you. https://www.facebook.com/holly.oleary.14/posts/10204240445388312?comment_id=10204240832958001&offset=0&total_comments=8

Hi Adriana, thanks for the amazing bread recipe you posted. I never buy bread as I don’t like to eat whole wheat . I made your bread and it was soooooooooo delicious! I finally can eat bread that doesn’t have any fillers in it! I used chia seeds instead of flaxseeds as I was of flax, and I used raw almond flour instead of blanched as that’s what I had available. I loved it! Thanks again!


The yeast in this low carb and keto bread ensures a wonderful texture and taste. Now, how much your bread will rise (and fall!) post-bake depends quite a bit on your altitude. But note that you still won’t get that gummy and wet texture here of most low carb breads. Plus, as mentioned, we’re baking at over 7,000 feet (Mexico City here!!), so if we can make this keto sandwich bread work so can you.
TBK Fitness Program by Tamir Katz shows how to achieve fitness through a healthy, natural hunter-gatherer diet along with a comprehensive exercise program with over 60 different bodyweight exercises of varying difficulty targeting all of the muscles in the body. Also included is a detailed discussion of nutrition and the diseases of civilization based on scientific research, information on stress management and preventive medicine, recommendations on vitamin and supplement use, tips on how to make your fitness program succeed where others have failed, tips on food shopping and preparation, sample meals, and more. The Amazon reviews average to 4+ stars.
Our keto bread recipe has a beautiful golden crust. It has great structure with a lovely rise and perfect bread-like crumb. It slices well for sandwiches or toasting, but you don’t have to toast or grill it to make it taste good. Sliced with a smear of salted butter is keto perfection. And it actually tastes like bread, not eggs or almonds or coconut. Additionally, this bread will keep well wrapped in the fridge for up to a week!
Chances are, if you're following the paleo diet, you're reallllly missing bread. We don't blame you! Bread is a huge part of our routines, from avocado toast at breakfast to tomato soup and grilled cheese for dinner. There's just too many good things to eat on bread! This recipe will help curb your carb-y cravings, and is sturdy enough to recreate all your favorite sandwiches and toasts. Curious? Continue reading for answers to our most frequently asked questions.

I just made version #2, and it was delicious. My pan was slightly larger, but I kept the 30 minute cooking time. It came out more golden brown on the outside, but it was perfectly moist. This is SO much tastier than store loaves, and I love slicing it thick. I greased my pan with butter and coconut oil and lined it with wax paper on the bottom, and it slipped right out.


Alcohol is a no-no if you are strict paleo. Beer is made from grains, and liquor also contains traces of gluten. But, good news for cider-lovers: most hard ciders are gluten-free, so they are allowed. Check the label to be sure. Red wine is more accepted in the paleo community because it contains the antioxidant resveratrol, but sorry chardonnay lovers, white wine is technically not allowed.
Another possibility is that maybe your oven is not well calibrater (which is normal) and your bread needed to cook longer. I suggest next time you insert the stick in a few areas to ensure it’s done throughout. Also, it’s a good idea to purchase an oven thermometer to ensure the temperature is where you want it during baking. They cost less that $20, I got mine for less than $10.
Michele, this is the most delicious bread and can’t believe it’s paleo. So easy to make and keep. After a few days of keeping it out, I cut the rest into slices, put slice sized parchment paper between each one and freeze. I save the parchment for future loaves. Getting ready to make another one. It’s so delicious! Thank you for all your attempts to perfect it. YUM!!
This is one of the best gluten-free bread recipes I’ve tried. I made mine in a 9 x 5 loaf pan. It’s a little vertically challenged, but it still tastes good and has a nice texture to it. I’m a recovering carb-junkie who realized the one thing I craved most was likely a factor in decades worth of digestive grief. As an experiment, I eliminated wheat products from my diet and my digestive health has shown significant improvement. But I have so missed my morning toast with peanut butter. This bread is a great replacement, one that’s both tasty and nutritious (unlike store bought GF bread). It’s delicious with peanut butter, jam, butter, or just on its own. Thank you for the wonderful recipe!
Hello. I saw somewhere in your posts you gave the almond flour in grams. I can’t find it again. Could you tell me again. I did save the conversion chart you posted, but just want to make sure I get it exact. I have made this once. I need to get a few different products and then I think it won’t be so oily. Most of the photos posted and mine where dark in color. In your photo, the bread looks lighter in color. Any suggestions. Sorry if you already addressed these questions. There were so many comments to sort through. Thank you 🙂
The Raw Paleo Diet & Lifestyle site is a resource created by members of the Raw Paleolithic Diet community for people looking to improve their health by choosing a more historically natural approach to diet, fitness and lifestyle. They have two forums: Raw Paleo Forum. It has some activity. And Raw Paleo Diet, or RVAF Raw Veg and Animal Foods Group, a forum for followers of semi-RPD diets, (such as Aajonus Vonderplanitz's Primal Diet/Weston-Price Diet/Sally Fallon/Instincto) and followers of the NeanderThin/Paleo/Stefansson Diets, who, for health reasons, wish to pursue a more fully Raw, Paleolithic variation of those diets.
Drop Grok into the Hiwi's midst—or indeed among any modern or ancient hunter–gather society—and he would be a complete aberration. Grok cannot teach us how to live or eat; he never existed. Living off the land or restricting oneself to foods available before agriculture and industry does not guarantee good health. The human body is not simply a collection of adaptations to life in the Paleolithic—its legacy is far greater. Each of us is a dynamic assemblage of inherited traits that have been tweaked, transformed, lost and regained since the beginning of life itself. Such changes have not ceased in the past 10,000 years.
The Paleo Answer: 7 Days to Lose Weight, Feel Great, Stay Young by Loren Cordain. The author shows you how to supercharge the Paleo diet for optimal lifelong health and weight loss. Featuring a new prescriptive 7-day plan and surprising revelations from the author's original research, it's the most powerful Paleo guide yet. Published December 20, 2011.

Grass-fed beef is often highlighted on the diet, which is promoted to contain more omega-3 fats than conventional beef (due to being fed grass instead of grain). It does contain small amounts of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), a precursor to EPA and DHA. However, only a small proportion of ALA can be converted in the body to long-chain omega-3 fatty acids (EPA and DHA). The amount of omega-3 is also highly variable depending on the exact feeding regimen and differences in fat metabolism among cattle breeds. [3] In general, the amount of omega-3 in grass-fed beef is much lower than that in oily marine fish. [3] Cooked salmon contains 1000-2000 mg of EPA/DHA per 3-ounce portion, whereas 3 ounces of grass-fed beef contains about 20-200 mg of ALA.
Combining higher protein intake and fresh vegetables leads to another major benefit: blood sugar stabilization. Between 35 and 45 percent of the average Paleo diet is comprised of non-starchy fresh fruits and vegetables that won’t spike blood sugar levels, making it an optimal diet for diabetes prevention. This is because nearly all of these foods have low glycemic indices that are slowly digested and absorbed by the body.
You really can make any kind of bread Paleo friendly. This flatbread would be perfect for a dairy-free pizza or scooping on fresh tomatoes bruschetta-style. Best of all, it's super low-key to make; you just need coconut flour, Paleo baking powder, and egg whites, plus whatever herbs you want to spice it up with (try rosemary or basil for some fresh flavor).
If you have more questions on specific foods, we’ve included a comprehensive list of paleo diet foods below. We’ve provided a list of the foods that are allowed on the paleo diet. We’ve also broken this list down into the specific food groups, so you can see which meats, vegetables, fruits, nuts, and fats are on the paleo diet. In addition to all of that, we’ve also included a comprehensive list of foods not allowed on the paleo diet.
Like many diets, the risks that come from eating the Paleo Diet is due to an imbalanced diet. For example, the Paleo Diet requires eating a large amount of meat. This can lead to excess consumption of saturated fat and cholesterol. “Those that follow this pattern of eating do not account for the differences in fatty acid composition of the meat of the animals today versus the composition 10,000 years ago." Malik told Live Science. "During our ancestors’ days, the fatty acid composition of livestock consisted of higher omega-3 fats— fats that actually improve our health. However, due to differences in the way we feed and raise livestock today, the meat tends to be higher in saturated fat.”
There has been so much nutrition and dietary mis-information in the past 100 years, it’s very confusing to sort it all out. I’m thankful I found Paleo! And as paleo shoppers, we know to avoid the center of the market and stick to the outside loop which is where we find the lean proteins, the nuts, seeds, greens, vegetables and fruits. It not only saves us time when we shop, it keeps us healthy.
According to the CDC, cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death in the United States. Interestingly however, our Paleolithic ancestors and contemporarily studied hunter-gatherers showed virtually no heart attack or stroke while eating ancestral diets. The references below will explore these facts to better help you understand the heart-healthy benefits of a Paleo diet.
The only downside is that it is small and we eat almost all of it in a day! I’d love to make several loaves at a time and freeze them. Have you tried freezing it? How do you wrap it and how long does it last in the freezer? Thanks so much for this recipe, it’s made going paleo so much easier for my family, especially when I think about school lunches!
WOW! WOW! WOW! Did I say Wow! This is exactly what I have been looking for, a low carb bread as I am a diabetic. I did not know that arrowroot is a carb but I calculated that 1/2c. equals 72 g. of carbohydrates roughly. So not too bad. I have enjoyed every recipe I have tried so far. I can’t tell you how happy I am that I accidentally discovered your website. Keep up the good work!! I just can’t stop making everything I see. ?
I’ve never left a review before, but can’t help myself because this gluten-free bread is to die for (figuratively). Although, I did make a couple of adjustments because I’m allergic to tree nuts and sensitive to coconut products. In place of almond flour I made my own cashew flour (added raw cashews to food processor and let run until as fine as I could get it without it turning into butter). I substitute the coconut solid for Spectrum Organic Palm Oil shortening. I was worried that it would taste eggy with 4 eggs, but went ahead and used 4 eggs and YEAH — not eggy tasting (to me). P.S. Cashews nuts is not a tree nut, it’s a legume.
I make my own ACV from apple scraps. It’s so easy….after peeling and coring apples for another recipe, you take the scraps, let them air dry for a bit, then put them in a jar with water, cover with coffee filter and rubberband, put in cabinet and let it sit. 3 days is minimum, and better is 5-6 weeks or longer. I have let it sit for months and have come out with a great product. My first batch, I did add a couple tablespoons of Braggs as a starter. This will create a “mother” you can use over and over again. It’s a continuous process…and you never run out of ACV!
Of course, this is just the basic of basic recipes, and you can spice it up with some Italian seasoning or some fruit mixed into the batter. When making the basic bread, I’ve found that my favorite way of eating this Paleo bread is with a hot bowl of chilli, but it also tastes great with some paleo jam or dipped in some soup. It’s not the best bread you’ve ever had, but it’s pretty good for 6 and 1/2 minutes of cooking!

Meet Grok. According to his online profile, he is a tall, lean, ripped and agile 30-year-old. By every measure, Grok is in superb health: low blood pressure; no inflammation; ideal levels of insulin, glucose, cholesterol and triglycerides. He and his family eat really healthy, too. They gather wild seeds, grasses, and nuts; seasonal vegetables; roots and berries. They hunt and fish their own meat. Between foraging, building sturdy shelters from natural materials, collecting firewood and fending off dangerous predators far larger than himself, Grok's life is strenuous, perilous and physically demanding. Yet, somehow, he is a stress-free dude who always manages to get enough sleep and finds the time to enjoy moments of tranquility beside gurgling creeks. He is perfectly suited to his environment in every way. He is totally Zen.
I really wanted to keep this nut and seed paleo bread more on the seed side. Haha, you get my point. The only nut that is really involved is almond in the almond flour. The rest are seeds such as pumpkin seeds, chia seed, and poppyseed, which you can interchange with flax or sunflower seeds. Either way, it truly gives the bread a nutty flavor that’s not too heavy. Cool?

Hi Ashley, Usually egg whites take just a few minutes to beat to stiff peaks. Definitely not 40 minutes. Old eggs can sometimes be the culprit, or a bit of leftover fat/grease from something else in the bowl can prevent stiff peaks (this is especially common when using a plastic bowl). Lastly, it could be that your mixer isn’t powerful enough to beat that many whites to stiff peaks, but this reason is a last resort and probably less likely. Cream of tartar is a huge help in reaching stiff peaks so you can try adding that next time.
Hello! I was wondering if you had ever doubled or tripled the recipe in order to use a standard size loaf pan? I wasn’t paying attention to the size and made a regular recipe in a standard loaf pan and the results were, well, flat. Then I realized my goof. Hoping to avoid the purchase of another pan, but will definitely buy a new one if it means I can make this bread!
I made this last night and it turned out great! I used Bob’s Red Mill almond flour which I know you don’t usually recommend and subbed 1/8 cup chia seed for the flax because that’s what I had on hand and it worked well. We’ve had grilled cheese and peanut butter sandwiches so far. My son is autistic and a very picky eater, and sometimes we have a hard time getting him the protein he needs so this recipe helps a lot. Thanks, Elana!

I wish we didn’t have to test every adjustment to a recipe to figure out if it works. It would save us all so much time and money! If I only had a crystal ball that would give me the answer to all of your substitution questions, I would be so happy. Unfortunately, I don’t. So be adventurous. If you have an idea, test it. Then come back here and let us all know if it works.
I’m not a believer in vegan or Paleo diets. I believe in a healthy diet that leans somewhat in the vegetarian direction and I just became convinced of the need to eliminate wheat from my diet. I applaud this website and the author for providing me with the bread alternatives I was looking for. I also appreciated the open eclectic attitude of the author in including some items recommended by vegans. Still, I believe red meat should be avoided . Thank You.
Have to laugh with me — I mixed it all up in my cuisinart, popped it in the perfect sized, non stick bread pan and put it in the oven for 5 minutes before I realized I’d forgotten the Apple Cider Vinegar! (Which helps the baking soda do its work, right?) I grabbed it out, poured the vinegar on top and stirred it up and shoved it back in. It came out fine, believe it or not! I’m having earth balance margarine on it, with some honey, Yum.
It took a month or so, but I finally decided to start playing around with adding a few other paleo-friendly starches, like arrowroot and tapioca. That’s what it took for me to come up with what I consider to be the perfect loaf. I had been holding out on adding other starches because I wanted to keep my ingredient list minimal, but really, these additions make all the difference in the end result of this bread.
Nutrition & Physical Degeneration by Dr. Weston Price's book puts to rest a lot of myths about diet, dental, physical, and emotional health, and presents the strongest case for a super-nutritious Native (or Paleo) Diet. His book outlines the conditions/causes for exceptional health. A classic that was first published in 1938. The Soil and Health Library has a Book Review by Steve Solomon. If you don't buy the book at least read the review. N.B. If you live in one of the countries where this book is now in the public domain, you can read it online. But not if you live in a country where it is still under copyright protection.
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Advocates of the diet argue that the increase in diseases of affluence after the dawn of agriculture was caused by changes in diet, but others have countered that it may be that pre-agricultural hunter-gatherers did not suffer from the diseases of affluence because they did not live long enough to develop them.[30] Based on the data from hunter-gatherer populations still in existence, it is estimated that at age 15, life expectancy was an additional 39 years, for a total age of 54.[31] At age 45, it is estimated that average life expectancy was an additional 19 years, for a total age of 64 years.[32][33] That is to say, in such societies, most deaths occurred in childhood or young adulthood; thus, the population of elderly – and the prevalence of diseases of affluence – was much reduced. Excessive food energy intake relative to energy expended, rather than the consumption of specific foods, is more likely to underlie the diseases of affluence. "The health concerns of the industrial world, where calorie-packed foods are readily available, stem not from deviations from a specific diet but from an imbalance between the energy humans consume and the energy humans spend."[34]
Some Paleo dieters emphasize that they never believed in one true caveman lifestyle or diet and that—in the fashion of Sisson's Blueprint—they use our evolutionary past to form guidelines, not scripture. That strategy seems reasonably solid at first, but quickly disintegrates. Even though researchers know enough to make some generalizations about human diets in the Paleolithic with reasonable certainty, the details remain murky. Exactly what proportions of meat and vegetables did different hominid species eat in the Paleolithic? It's not clear. Just how far back were our ancestors eating grains and dairy? Perhaps far earlier than we initially thought. What we can say for certain is that in the Paleolithic, the human diet varied immensely by geography, season and opportunity. "We now know that humans have evolved not to subsist on a single, Paleolithic diet but to be flexible eaters, an insight that has important implications for the current debate over what people today should eat in order to be healthy," anthropologist William Leonard of Northwestern University wrote in Scientific American in 2002.

I don’t like keeping track of how much I’ve eaten or obsessing over how many grams of a particular nutrient I’ve had. Not only do I hate counting calories, but I know that calories are really only half of the battle, as they’re not all created equal – 400 calories of Doritos do NOT have the same effect on your body as 400 calories of high-quality vegetables and protein.
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