Paleo diets are based on a simple premise – if the cavemen didn’t eat it, you shouldn’t either. So long to refined sugar, dairy, legumes and grains (this is pre-agricultural revolution), and hello to meat, fish, poultry, fruits and veggies. The idea is that by eliminating modern-era foods like highly-processed carbs and dairy, you can avoid or control “diseases of civilization” like Type 2 diabetes and heart disease, and likely lose weight too. What you eat and how much depend on your goals or the specific program you’re on, if you choose to follow one. The high-protein diet is ranked poorly among U.S. News experts, who consider it too restrictive to be healthy or sustainable.
Finally found the recommended loaf size and could hardly wait to make this paleo bread. After 45 minutes and the toothpick coming out clean, removed it from the oven. After it cooled, cut it to serve and had two inches on either end and about a half an inch on the top and bottom that were edible. The middle consisted of what I would call an empty tunnel about the size of a silver dollar and surrounded by uncooked batter. Yuck. What’s so interesting is I made your Scrumptious Sandwich bread out of your book, and it turned out perfectly. I’ve been baking a LONG time, and I can’t even speculate as to what happened to this loaf. Did I have a massive air bubble in the middle, and, if so, why? Did using the food processor affect it? Any light you can shed on this will be greatly appreciated. I’ve been experimenting with the recipes in this cookbook and loving it. Please help me understand what happened to this paleo bread.
I’ve tried a few other paleo/grain free breads and this is by far the best. It tastes great but what’s amazing about this recipe is ITS SO EASY. Being able to throw all the ingredients in a mixer and not having to fuss with whipping and folding in egg whites, etc is a perk. I made two modifications and it turned out well. Slightly melted raw honey in place of maple syrup and I doubled the recipe because I like the loaf to be close to a standard size (obviously adds a quite longer bake time but worth it).
Grass-fed beef is often highlighted on the diet, which is promoted to contain more omega-3 fats than conventional beef (due to being fed grass instead of grain). It does contain small amounts of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), a precursor to EPA and DHA. However, only a small proportion of ALA can be converted in the body to long-chain omega-3 fatty acids (EPA and DHA). The amount of omega-3 is also highly variable depending on the exact feeding regimen and differences in fat metabolism among cattle breeds. [3] In general, the amount of omega-3 in grass-fed beef is much lower than that in oily marine fish. [3] Cooked salmon contains 1000-2000 mg of EPA/DHA per 3-ounce portion, whereas 3 ounces of grass-fed beef contains about 20-200 mg of ALA.
Vitamin D is the one supplement that would be paleo. At least it would be for those of us that don't live outside year round. You can have your D level measured. The low RDAs only prevent definable deficiences, not problems that take a long time to develop. Michael Holick, MD is a leading writer on this subject. This is a 10 page PDF: Vitamin D: importance in the prevention of cancers, type 1 diabetes, heart disease, and osteoporosis and its companion Sunlight and vitamin D for bone health and prevention of autoimmune diseases, cancers, and cardiovascular disease [change PDF to 100% to read]. Or if you prefer, there is an hour video on YouTube.
Thank you for the recipe and wonderful website. This bread is fantastic! I took the liberty of changing a few things around and used what was on hand: Bob’s Redmill Almond meal, fortunately the texture is excellent, 1/2 cup roasted & mashed Delicata Squash, one tablespoon of Ghee, one tablespoon of Coconut oil instead of 1/4 cup, substituted Hemp Seed for Flax meal and Volia! Delicious.

We cannot time travel and join our Paleo ancestors by the campfire as they prepare to eat; likewise, shards of ancient pottery and fossilized teeth can tell us only so much. If we compare the diets of so-called modern hunter-gatherers, however, we see just how difficult it is to find meaningful commonalities and extract useful dietary guidelines from their disparate lives (see infographic). Which hunter–gatherer tribe are we supposed to mimic, exactly? How do we reconcile the Inuit diet—mostly the flesh of sea mammals—with the more varied plant and land animal diet of the Hadza or !Kung? Chucking the many different hunter–gather diets into a blender to come up with some kind of quintessential smoothie is a little ridiculous. "Too often modern health problems are portrayed as the result of eating 'bad' foods that are departures from the natural human diet…This is a fundamentally flawed approach to assessing human nutritional needs," Leonard wrote. "Our species was not designed to subsist on a single, optimal diet. What is remarkable about human beings is the extraordinary variety of what we eat. We have been able to thrive in almost every ecosystem on the Earth, consuming diets ranging from almost all animal foods among populations of the Arctic to primarily tubers and cereal grains among populations in the high Andes.”
Legumes are members of a large family of plants that have a seed or pod. This category includes all beans, peas, lentils, tofu and other soyfoods, and peanuts. Legumes are not allowed on paleo because of their high content of lectins and phytic acid. Similar to grains, this is a point of controversy in the scientific community. In fact, lots of research supports eating legumes as part of a healthy diet because they are low in fat and high in fiber, protein and iron.
With a very simple shift we not only remove the foods that are at odds with our health (grains, legumes, and dairy) but we also increase our intake of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. Here is a great paper from Professor Loren Cordain exploring how to build a modern Paleo diet: The nutritional characteristics of a contemporary diet based upon Paleolithic food groups. This paper also offers significant insight as to the amounts and ratios of protein, carbohydrate and fat in the ancestral diet.

Wow – great bread recipe, let alone paleo! Thank you! After reading other posts I doubled the recipe and whipped my egg whites to soft peaks, folding in gently at the end. Didn’t have enough flax so used combo of chia and flax. This made 2 good sized, lovely light high topped loaves, topped with nigella and sesame seeds (reminiscent of my favourite turkish bread from the old days). What an amazing taste and texture this bread has – will experiment with it now – I think it will be yummy with some fresh rosemary chopped and folded through or maybe lemon thyme and goats cheese feta…..


Just made these today. They are really tasty. I love all those layers, especially that coconut filling! Question: How long do these store in the freezer? It’s just for me and my husband so I’d imagine it would take at least several days to go through these. Even one is filling and satisfying. which I like. You don’t have to eat a ton of it to be satisfied. Do you store yours in an air tight container? Mine are still out in the parchment-paper lined pan. Thanks.
In the long term, you have to be sure you’re getting calcium and other nutrients you’re missing by not having dairy products and certain grains. Some paleo-approved foods, such as salmon and spinach, contain calcium, so you have to be sure you’re including them in your diet. It would be a good idea to check with a registered dietitian, too, to make sure you’re meeting your calcium and other nutrient needs.

It turned out great! Such an amazing crust crunch and it has that spongy texture that all the other paleo breads don’t. It’s soft, light and spread on with Kerrygold salted butter!!! It’s got the slightest hint of sweet. Can’t wait to make my paleo strawberry jam for this! Also excited about applegate lunch meat with this bread for sandwiches! This will be a staple for us (im allergic to preservatives).
I wanted to try your recipe and I found almost all the ingredients here where I live. But I’m still stuck on the isolate whey protein. Could I skip to another protein, like pea protein? Do you think it alters rising/taste? I’ve never baked anything with this powder proteins, and since this pea protein happens to be the one easily on reach, I was wondering if you could help me sorting this out.
×