Thank you so much! I didn’t have any flax for the first couple of batches, so subbed extra almond flour, then made it my bread machine and it was a hit. But for this batch, I doubled to make two loaves using the ground golden flax and baked it in the oven, and it was even better!!! My son who has celiacs loves it. This is a godsend with school lunches coming up again.


I feel like I need to personally thank you for this recipe. I’ve had celiac disease for 7 years and have never been able to find (or make) a bread substitute that reminds me of the oh so glutenfull bread I used to enjoy, namely sandwich bread. I literally make these 1 if not 2 times a week! They make incredible sandwiches, open face “pizza crusts” and so much more. This bread is the real deal and I can’t thank you enough!!!
Paleo Comfort Foods: Homestyle Cooking in a Gluten-Free Kitchen by Julie Sullivan Mayfield and Charles Mayfield. Implementing paleo guidelines and principles in this book (no grains, no gluten, no legumes, no dairy), the Mayfields give you 100+ recipes and full color photos with entertaining stories throughout. The recipes in Paleo Comfort Foods can help individuals and families alike lose weight, eat healthy and achieve optimum fitness, making this way of eating sustainable, tasty and fun. The many reviews at Amazon are basically flawless. The sole complaint is over the lack of nutritional information. But there is no counting on the paleo diet and its inclusion would have been inappropriate. Published September 10, 2011.
Just made these today. They are really tasty. I love all those layers, especially that coconut filling! Question: How long do these store in the freezer? It’s just for me and my husband so I’d imagine it would take at least several days to go through these. Even one is filling and satisfying. which I like. You don’t have to eat a ton of it to be satisfied. Do you store yours in an air tight container? Mine are still out in the parchment-paper lined pan. Thanks.

As for the mixing…I mixed the dry ingredients in one bowl, then separated the egg yolks and whites, in bowls. I whipped the whites until they were thick. I added the yolks to the whites, and added the honey and oil. I mixed that up. I added the wet to the dry and mixed. It was really thick. Then I combined the baking soda and vinegar, mixing them. I added them to the whole mix and slightly stirred.
I just made version #2, and it was delicious. My pan was slightly larger, but I kept the 30 minute cooking time. It came out more golden brown on the outside, but it was perfectly moist. This is SO much tastier than store loaves, and I love slicing it thick. I greased my pan with butter and coconut oil and lined it with wax paper on the bottom, and it slipped right out.
In general, the paleo diet involves eating nutrient-rich real foods, such as meat, fish, nuts, eggs, vegetables, and fruits. It’s best to choose grass-fed and pasture-raised meats, and organic produce whenever possible. The paleo lifestyle removes refined sugars, grains, legumes, dairy, and unhealthy fats and oils from your diet, as well as highly processed foods. (Read more about the paleo diet on HealthLine and EatingWell.)
Experts estimate that our ancestors consumed a one-to-one ratio of calories from meats to produce. Since you have to eat a lot of salad to consume the same amount of calories in a steak, the paleo diet should ideally include mostly fruits and vegetables, Katz says. However, many people don't realize that and eat too much meat. Consuming excess protein and not enough carbs can cause kidney damage and also increase your risk of osteoporosis, Dr. Ochner says. Plus, since most of today's meats are higher in saturated fat than those of yesteryear, it can increase the risk of heart disease, Dr. Katz says.
We cannot time travel and join our Paleo ancestors by the campfire as they prepare to eat; likewise, shards of ancient pottery and fossilized teeth can tell us only so much. If we compare the diets of so-called modern hunter-gatherers, however, we see just how difficult it is to find meaningful commonalities and extract useful dietary guidelines from their disparate lives (see infographic). Which hunter–gatherer tribe are we supposed to mimic, exactly? How do we reconcile the Inuit diet—mostly the flesh of sea mammals—with the more varied plant and land animal diet of the Hadza or !Kung? Chucking the many different hunter–gather diets into a blender to come up with some kind of quintessential smoothie is a little ridiculous. "Too often modern health problems are portrayed as the result of eating 'bad' foods that are departures from the natural human diet…This is a fundamentally flawed approach to assessing human nutritional needs," Leonard wrote. "Our species was not designed to subsist on a single, optimal diet. What is remarkable about human beings is the extraordinary variety of what we eat. We have been able to thrive in almost every ecosystem on the Earth, consuming diets ranging from almost all animal foods among populations of the Arctic to primarily tubers and cereal grains among populations in the high Andes.”
Hi Gabriel, thank you! I think using bananas in this recipe will not work in place of the arrowroot. Although the bananas are also a starch, it will add moisture and affect the overall texture and taste. You could maybe substitute the yogurt for the bananas, but again the taste of your bread will be different. I have a few banana bread recipes on this blog. Do a search for banana bread to find them.
We’re in a position to understand more of the benefits of the Paleo diet now that we have a basic understanding of which food sources are emphasized. One major benefit of the Paleo diet is an increased consumption of vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and plant phytochemicals. Whole grains are not a good substitute for grass-produced or free-ranging meats, fruits, and veggies, as they contain no vitamin C, vitamin A, or vitamin B12. Many of the minerals and some of the B vitamins whole grains do contain are not absorbed efficiently by the body. The Paleo diet cuts out whole grains and replaces them with unprocessed, fresh foods.
[…] I don't like the word "diet", so I'll say that this is more a way of changing what you eat long-term. It's all based around what our ancestor hunter-gatherers would have eaten, and what we've evolved to be able to process and absorb. The very basic level of it, is that you don't eat carbohydrates, processed meats or sugars, and cut out dairy products. You instead eat plenty of fresh meat, fish, vegetables, fruits and nuts. You can still have oil, provided it's natural – so coconut, peanut & olive oil are all good. The good thing is that you're also allowed to take this to your own level – so if you want a couple of days off a week – say, weekends, you can do it & it will still be a lot healthier for you. This is a really helpful site I've used to make a note on my shopping list of what's allowed: The Ultimate Paleo Diet Food List | Ultimate Paleo Guide […]
Hi Adriana, thanks for the amazing bread recipe you posted. I never buy bread as I don’t like to eat whole wheat . I made your bread and it was soooooooooo delicious! I finally can eat bread that doesn’t have any fillers in it! I used chia seeds instead of flaxseeds as I was of flax, and I used raw almond flour instead of blanched as that’s what I had available. I loved it! Thanks again!
Elana I just love your recipes. I love the fact they are simple, don’t take long to rustle up, require minimum effort or minimal cookery skills, have few ingredients that I always usually have and ones I know (no going to Amazon to buy stuff I’ve never heard of before and don’t know how to use)they always work and I can depend on them every time, they taste amazing and you have such a variety on your website! I am a huge fan and when I search for gluten-free paleo recipes your website is the first place I come to and I usually find exactly what I need right here! This bread recipe is amazing and sooo good! I will def. be making this bread more regularly now as others’ just don’t compare! Thanks for all your hard work!
Andrew. it probably was almond flour and they called it powder to let people know it was finely ground. I think next time be sure to preheat your oven and if you can get an oven thermometer to make sure the temperature is where you want it. Also, use arrowroot instead of tapioca if you can find it. You could blend the wet ingredients in a blender or beat the eggs well. You can also beat the egg whites until stiff peaks form and then gently fold that into the batter to give your bread more lift. Keep me posted please 🙂
New here, but loving your recipees so far (totally game changer for my diet and life)! I’ve tried this bread a few times now, but am struggling with it a little bit and was hoping that you could help me try to figure out what to try next. The taste is fantastic, but I’m having trouble with the rise. My yeast is bubbling and I’ve had it proving on my oven (which is pretty hot! –too hot?). The structure inside looks like there were air bubbles, but they got knocked out or something (sort of squished), but your picture looks incredible so I’m hoping that I can change something. The taste seems a little dense and chewy so far. I’m very new to baking, so it might also be a bake problem. I’m in Chicago.
I made the dinner rolls today and the recipe worked great. I lightly greased a muffin pan, used a scant half cup of batter for each roll, baked for 15-18 minutes and they are perfect for holiday dinners. My yeild was 13 rolls. Good thing there was extra, because I ate one hot from the oven. I also used coconut vinegar and coconut nectar instead of apple cider vinegar and honey. Yum, Yum, Yum
The Carnitine Miracle by Robert Crayhon, M.S. The nutrient carnitine is abundant in red meat. According to Crayhon carnitine helps balance blood lipids and blood sugar levels, maximizes energy levels, increases endurance, eliminates discomfort in ketosis, promotes burning of fat and building of muscle and increases overall well-being. See reviews at Amazon.
I just made version #2, and it was delicious. My pan was slightly larger, but I kept the 30 minute cooking time. It came out more golden brown on the outside, but it was perfectly moist. This is SO much tastier than store loaves, and I love slicing it thick. I greased my pan with butter and coconut oil and lined it with wax paper on the bottom, and it slipped right out.
New here, but loving your recipees so far (totally game changer for my diet and life)! I’ve tried this bread a few times now, but am struggling with it a little bit and was hoping that you could help me try to figure out what to try next. The taste is fantastic, but I’m having trouble with the rise. My yeast is bubbling and I’ve had it proving on my oven (which is pretty hot! –too hot?). The structure inside looks like there were air bubbles, but they got knocked out or something (sort of squished), but your picture looks incredible so I’m hoping that I can change something. The taste seems a little dense and chewy so far. I’m very new to baking, so it might also be a bake problem. I’m in Chicago.
Hey Adriana! I did it! Came out beautifully. Much better than the paleo bread that you can purchase at Julian Bakery online. It is flavorful and light. What i did was the egg white trick from an earlier post. I used Honeyville products only. I also did 2/3 cups of coconut flour and 3/4 cup of almond flour. I was hoping for a little bit more of a rise, but I’ll mess with it again next time. Thank you for your expertise! All the best! Gabriel
Hi, I have just put this loaf into the oven, but mine never reached a pouring consistency. It was a thick dough which I was able to spread in the loaf pan only with the greatest difficulty. The only changes I made were omitting the arrowroot, as I didn’t have it – I followed your notes for that exactly, increasing the tapioca to 4 tablespoons and adding an extra egg white. I used de-fatted almond flour, which should not account for the dryness of the mixture – I actually had to leave out half a cup of the dry moisture, because it was already so doughy. Any idea what went wrong?
^ Hall H (2014). "Food myths: what science knows (and does not know) about diet and nutrition". Skeptic. 19 (4). p. 10. Fad diets and "miracle" diet supplements promise to help us lose weight effortlessly. Different diet gurus offer a bewildering array of diets that promise to keep us healthy and make us live longer: vegan, Paleo, Mediterranean, low fat, low carb, raw food, gluten-free ... the list goes on. (subscription required)
Our keto bread recipe has a beautiful golden crust. It has great structure with a lovely rise and perfect bread-like crumb. It slices well for sandwiches or toasting, but you don’t have to toast or grill it to make it taste good. Sliced with a smear of salted butter is keto perfection. And it actually tastes like bread, not eggs or almonds or coconut. Additionally, this bread will keep well wrapped in the fridge for up to a week!
Hi Meredith, every photo I share with my recipes are from the same recipe. I usually photograph the food right after I make them. This bread does not rise as much as regular bread during baking, but it does rise well. I use golden flax seeds. This recipe is meant to be made on a medium loaf pan of 8½ x 4½ inches. If you have a larger pan, you can double the recipe so that when baked the bread will rise to the top of your pan and will not be so thin.
Chances are, if you're following the paleo diet, you're reallllly missing bread. We don't blame you! Bread is a huge part of our routines, from avocado toast at breakfast to tomato soup and grilled cheese for dinner. There's just too many good things to eat on bread! This recipe will help curb your carb-y cravings, and is sturdy enough to recreate all your favorite sandwiches and toasts. Curious? Continue reading for answers to our most frequently asked questions.
There is little argument over the health benefits of fruits and vegetables. They are chock-full of vitamins, minerals, fiber and antioxidants. The only caveat for paleo dieters is that some vegetables are starchy (e.g., potatoes) and some fruits are higher in sugar (e.g., bananas). So, if you are trying to lose weight or watch your blood sugar levels, eat these in moderation. In fact, potatoes are banned from some versions of the diet.
Hi Solange, if you use the recommended size baking pan, the bread will be the proper height. If you use a pan that is bigger than the one I used, your bread will rise, but it won’t fill the pan to the right height. Here’s an example that might help –if you place 1/2 cup of water in a 1/2 measuring cup it will be 100% full to the top of the cup. If you put the same 1/2 cup of water in a 1 cup measuring cup it will only fill it 50% and will only be 1/2 full in height. That’s why a loaf pan that is too large doesn’t work for this recipe when it comes to the height of the loaf :-)
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I have a processor but I use my big girl lifting weights mixer. I use the whip not the paddle to mix first the eggs getting in lots of air and and fold in 2 cups of thick yogurt cheese.(Regular non fat plain yogurt filtered though a coffee filter in the refrig.) I use the paddle and add the dry ingredients. I mix them on slow and just for a brief make sure that the dough it is all the same all the way through. I am seeing now whether I can replace the coconut oil with extra virgin elixir of the olives as sweet is not great with horseradish on roast beef. I’m also thinking that although it doesn’t rise much if at all that if I patted it into a loaf shape in some way and oiled the crust heavily it might have a smooth crust. and then plop it in the pan. I toast it like for egg in the hole by browning it in a heavy frying pan. Okay it is not bread bread but it better than no b read at all. And best of all I like it just fine and that’s what counts in the long run. Food should not be such a big deal. It should get your from point A to Point B with style and class not slathering butter on just cooked doughy yeasty hard on the digestion bread for me any more. I’m going to try going all almond flour as the coconut flour has so moisture and sweet ness that contributes to the heavy texture I think Of course the moisture is what makes it stick together too, Everything is a work in progress remember to use your processor to make crumbs out of the not so hot loaves. Breaded lemon dill tilapia anyone?
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