Our ancestors didn't chase cows and chickens around in the wild. They hunted game, antelopes, buffalo, and probably some animals we've never heard of that are long extinct. Their meat was generally quite lean, and provided more healthy omega 3s than meats from modern day animals, even the grass-fed ones, according to Dr. Katz. Many of the plants that thrived back then are also extinct today, making it impossible to truly follow their meal plan, he says.

Oh my goodness. I’m new to your site and this is the first recipe I have tried. It really is SUCH a tasty, flavorful bread. I did make some changes. I followed a comment on your pinterest pin for this recipe, and the person who tried it recommended 1/2 tsp xanthem gum in place of 1/2 cup arrowroot powder. I did this to lower the carb count and because arrowroot was the only ingredient I was lacking. It reminds me of a somewhat sweet, but still savory wheat flavored corn muffin. I’m sorry if that’s confusing. It’s a bit more tender/crumbly than sandwich bread though, and I do think that has to do with my substitution. For this reason it might be too delicate to support a sandwich. Regardless, it’s delicious as a side in a dish. I actually prefer it that way. Thank you again for sharing. So thankful.
I just made version #2, and it was delicious. My pan was slightly larger, but I kept the 30 minute cooking time. It came out more golden brown on the outside, but it was perfectly moist. This is SO much tastier than store loaves, and I love slicing it thick. I greased my pan with butter and coconut oil and lined it with wax paper on the bottom, and it slipped right out.
Coconut Flour: As Lexi pointed out Coconut Flour is not a 1:1 ratio. Coconut flour absorbs a LOT of liquid, so you have to either combine it with other flours in light quantaties, or use 6 eggs for every 1/2 cup of flour. Yes, I said 6 eggs with every ONE HALF cup of coconut flour. You can also use various liquids. Either way, it needs to have the same consistency as it would if you used the almond flour, it should be thin like pancake. If not it will out very dense.
The Stone Age Diet: Based on in-depth studies of human ecology and the diet of man by Walter L. Voegtlin. This was self-published back in 1975. Only a couple hundred copies were printed and distributed to friends and relatives. No one knew the book existed until some years later. In no way is he the father of the paleo diet. It is impossible to purchase. Apparently his descendents are planning a reprint, though the book is poorly written and not based upon factual anthropological information that even was available then. We have put up his Functional and Structural Comparison of Man's Digestive Tract with that of a Dog and Sheep. And a PDF can be found here.
When you're scrambling up a rocky bluff or bounding along a riverbank, the last thing you want is gravel and grit seeping into your FiveFingers. The Vibram FiveFingers KSO is an all-new design with thin, abrasion-resistant stretch polyamide and breathable stretch mesh that wraps your entire forefoot to "Keep Stuff Out." A single hook-and-loop closure helps secure the fit. Non-marking Vibram TC1 performance rubber soles are razor-siped for a sure grip. KSO IS BEST FOR: Light Trekking, Climbing, Canyoneering, Running, Fitness Training, Martial Arts, Yoga, Pilates, Sailing, Boating, Kayaking, Canoeing, Surfing, Flats Fishing, Travel. Available in Black or Grey/Palm/Clay.
Evolution of the Human Diet: The Known, the Unknown, and the Unknowable by Peter S. Ungar. Diet is key to understanding the ecology and evolution of our distant ancestors and their kin, the early hominins. A study of the range of foods eaten by our progenitors underscores just how unhealthy many of our diets are today. This volume brings together authorities from disparate fields to offer new insights into the diets of our ancestors. Paleontologists, archaeologists, primatologists, nutritionists and other researchers all contribute pieces to the puzzle. The book has four sections: Reconstructed diets based on hominin fossils--tooth size, shape, structure, wear, and chemistry, mandibular biomechanics. Archaeological evidence of subsistence--stone tools and modified bones. Models of early hominin diets based on the diets of living primates--both human and non-human, paleoecology, and energetics. Nutritional analyses and their implications for evolutionary medicine. 

I’m new to the paleo lifestyle, if I’m honest I’m new to healthy non fast food lifestyle as well. I have recently undergone gastric sleeve surgery and had thought I would never be able to eat a sandwich ever again. Then I found the Paleo food movement and in particular your site. I have tried a lot of your recipes and this bread is my favorite. I love how moist it is and that it remains fresh for a full week. It also freezes well too. Thank you so much for re-introducing me to the sandwich.
This spring, Dr Cordain did an interview answering ten questions about the basics of The Paleo Diet®. To start your New Years out right, we wanted to share his answers with you. We hope you enjoy! - The Paleo Diet Team 1. The Paleo diet can be traced to a 1975 book by Walter Voegtlin, but, correct me if I’m wrong, you are responsible for bringing this diet to popularity in your 2002 book “The Paleo Diet.” Can you me about your...
Thank you so much for your recipe. This is the best keto bread recipe I have come across. There is only one suggestion it’s better to use medium size 8X4 inch pan to get perfect size slices. There is one question., can we replace coconut flour with almond flour completely? If yes what is the quantity for almond flour in this case? Thank you once again. 

Hi Kristi, I’m glad you liked the taste! Sorry it didn’t rise for you. It’s hard to say what happened without being in the kitchen with you. Were the peaks in the egg whites not firm enough, or did they fall too much when folding with the rest of the batter? That is the main culprit I can think of, as the egg whites are a big part of what creates the volume in this bread.
Hi Mindy – same here. But I did read in a comment about 1 or 2 years ago the same thing. From what I remember from those comments, others said the type of food we make from Elana’s baked recipes are just not designed to sit for more than 2 – 3 days. Other commenters chimed in and said their family eats up everything they bake, so nothing sits long enough to get the 3-day-old smell.
Slight changes I had to make: pumpkin puree in place of the applesauce (1:1), a whoopie pie pan in place of the ring molds, and I baked for 12 minutes instead of 15. The pan yielded 8 “rolls” which I sliced *very* thinly to make some jam and nut butter sandwiches. Delicious! Thanks so much for the recipe! (I found this recipe via Pinterest, by the way.)

Like a lot of others, mine didn’t rise as much as I had hoped, so the crumb is a bit more dense. Next time, I’ll give it longer than an hour and see if that helps. My loaf pan is also a bit bigger, so I think I’ll do 1.5 times the recipe next time for a larger slice of bread as mine was very short and squat, lol. Overall though, I’m thrilled. This is by far the best grain-free bread I’ve ever tasted!
Diana Schwarzbein is another M.D. that has come to realize that low carb is what works. See reviews at The Schwarzbein Principle. The book is based on her work with insulin-resistant patients with Type II diabetes. She concludes that low-fat diets cause heart attacks, eating fat makes you lose body fat, and it's important to eat high-cholesterol foods every day.
I just made the paleo bread and I am enjoying a warm slice as I type this comment. I wanted to share that I substituted pure maple syrup for the honey and used a blender to mix since I don’t own a food processor. The loaf still came out delicious and moist. I wish I could submit a picture of my wonderful looking loaf. Thanks for sharing your recipes.
For instance, the fat allowance of the diet may be problematic. “My biggest hang-up with the paleo diet is all of the saturated fats it promotes with all of the meats,” explains Holley, noting that you could look for a locally sourced meat, whose origin and method of raising you're aware of, as a healthier option. Saturated fat from meat has been linked with an increased risk of early death. (9)
Mine had a distinct ammonia scent, which I noticed from the comments was an issue for a few other posters as well. My research tells me not enough acid in my batch to neutralize the soda. I may have left it a bit too long in my processor because my coconut oil was lumpy and I was trying to break it up. It tastes a bit like Irish soda bread, which is not my favorite. I’m thinking of experimenting with baking powder instead to suit my personal preference.
Thank you Lexi for sharing your “Sandwich Paleo Rolls” recipe!! This is the second time that I have made them and each time I make a double batch!! I make the rolls in a muffin tin as I do not have the round forms. I also substituted coconut oil for palm oil — I used the same amount. These are GREAT right out of the oven with a bit of butter and some honey!! 🙂 The rolls are just as good and soft 3 days after baking them. Thank you!! Thank you!!
Sounds great. I just wondered if I chose to use just coconut flour and not almond, how much more coconut flour would I use than the original recipe calls for? I know that coconut flour soaks up much more liquid than almond floud so not sure if I would also need to add more liquid and if so what and how much? I’m new to paleo and not much of a cook but I’m trying to change that, esp with this new lifestyle change I’m trying to make. The Paleo bread I can get in stores is just too expensive, so I’m trying to do this on my own to save money. Also I need something like this to use with almond butter as a post-workout snack after hitting the gym. Options for portable protein are really limited, so that would work the best.
Even if eating only foods available to hunter–gatherers in the Paleolithic made sense, it would be impossible. As Christina Warinner of the University of Zurich emphasizes in her 2012 TED talk, just about every single species commonly consumed today—whether a fruit, vegetable or animal—is drastically different from its Paleolithic predecessor. In most cases, we have transformed the species we eat through artificial selection: we have bred cows, chickens and goats to provide as much meat, milk and eggs as possible and have sown seeds only from plants with the most desirable traits—with the biggest fruits, plumpest kernels, sweetest flesh and fewest natural toxins. Cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts and kale are all different cultivars of a single species, Brassica oleracea; generation by generation, we reshaped this one plant's leaves, stems and flowers into wildly different arrangements, the same way we bred Welsh corgis, pugs, dachshunds, Saint Bernards and greyhounds out of a single wolf species. Corn was once a straggly grass known as teosinte and tomatoes were once much smaller berries. And the wild ancestors of bananas were rife with seeds.
I just wanted to mention, because I don’t believe it has come up yet, that I substituted ground sunflower seeds for the almond flour (they are much cheaper and I have successfully used them in many almond flour recipes!) however I noticed something very odd this time… the bread was green when it came out of the oven! I was stumped, but after some research, found out that baking soda reacts with the chlorophyll in sunflower seeds and turns them green.
I enjoyed the concept of this recipe and decided to give it a shot. My gut reaction by looking at the ingredients i though the salt would be too much. I was right. I have tried this recipe twice. Both times it came out entirely too salty. I even halved the salt the second time. This recipe was a total flop for me. I followed the recipe exactly with the slight adjustment to the salt the second time. I think it needs a pinch of salt and maybe less baking powder. Perhaps adding honey or maple syrup will curb the saltiness but that would defeat the purpose of having an unsweetened bread. More experimenting is on the horizon for me. Thanks for sharing.
Liza, I haven’t tried this recipe using cashew flour, but if you’ve had success using a 1:1 substitution for almond flour making other bread-type recipes, I think it could work! I also haven’t tried this recipe using coconut milk, but other readers have and said it works well. Yes, please let us know how it goes if you try it with these substitutions!
I love this bread!!! Because of this bread, I can eat a sandwich now and then and not be in pain from gluten and additives. I’ve also made it into French toast and it came out great. Dairy is a problem food for me, so I substitute the butter for coconut oil and use coconut cream in place of yogurt. I freeze this bread in half loaves so I always have some on hand. Delicious!!
If possible, can you create a bread recipe that is keto friendly, and can be made in a bread machine? I have found a successful low carb bread recipe that my husband likes to eat but that includes vital wheat gluten. I have been trying to find a recipe that can be made in a bread machine and that doesn’t require gluten for some time, but I have been unsuccessful. Please create one.

The only bad thing about this bread is that I CAN’T STOP EATING IT! Lol. I’ve been without bread for two months. The first recipe I tried from Pinterest was a flax loaf that was a huge failure. This recipe was easy to make and turned out awesome. I used three eggs instead of four because I only had large/extra large eggs to choose from. It has the texture of banana bread so I originally thought it will be more of a treat vs a sandwich bread. I’ve been putting jams on it but then I saw the suggestion of pesto with tomatoes so I will be trying that next and will also try toasting it. Much thanks to the creator of this recipe and for sharing it!
The Carnitine Miracle by Robert Crayhon, M.S. The nutrient carnitine is abundant in red meat. According to Crayhon carnitine helps balance blood lipids and blood sugar levels, maximizes energy levels, increases endurance, eliminates discomfort in ketosis, promotes burning of fat and building of muscle and increases overall well-being. See reviews at Amazon.
Just made this bread this morning and it was wonderful! It will be a life saver since my 2 year old and husband are obsessed with bread. My only problem was that it came out very flat (only about an 1.5-2 inches thick). The only difference I could think of was that the only yogurt I had was plain whole milk, not greek. I was thinking about doubling the batch and cooking time to see if I get a thicker loaf. Any thoughts? It makes a good snack bread, but not sandwich bread since the slices are so small (they’d be finger sandwiches). Thanks again!!
OMG…Could your FABULOUS coconut palm syrup/recipe be used/considered as the ultra-expensive COCONUT NECTAR?..If so…this is sheer BRILLIANCE as it has provided a needed “Eureka” moment for me in my quest for a low glycemic substitute for agave or honey..Is the resulting syrup suitable for use in this fashion in baking?…Thank you so much for contributing your wonderful idea.
Both kids and adults will enjoy stretching the honey into taffy, and the longer you stretch the honey, the easier and more pliable the taffy becomes. To avoid a sticky situation, make sure any surface you set the taffy on is thinly coated with cooking spray. You can also wear latex gloves (coated with canola oil) to make the pulling a little easier.
Deadly Harvest: The Intimate Relationship Between Our Health and Our Food by Geoff Bond. The author is a nutritional anthropologist who has for years investigated both foods of the past and our prehistoric eating habits. Using the latest scientific research and studies of primitive tribal lifestyles, Bond first explains the actual diet that our ancestors followed--a diet that was and still is in harmony with the human species. He then describes how the foods in today's diets disrupt our biochemistry and digestive system, leading to health disorders such as allergies, arthritis, cancer, diabetes, heart disease, osteoporosis, obesity, and more. Most important, he explains the appropriate measures we can take to avoid these diseases--and even beat them back--through healthy eating. The conclusions of Deadly Harvest are that disease control happens by eating a strict low-glycemic diet, lowering the percentage of body fat you carry around, eat a diet consisting of mostly non-starchy plant-based foods, eat a low-fat diet with ample amounts of omega-3 fats, maintain good colon health, engage in regular physical activity, get some daily sunshine, and reduce chronic stress. If you do this, then diseases like cancer, heart disease, digestive problems, allergies, autoimmune diseases, brain diseases, diabetes, and obesity can be avoided. The Amazon reviews average to 5 stars.
I’ve perused your bread recipe offerings (which I hadn’t really looked at previously since we mostly just opt-out of bread-type products) and am wondering which you would most recommend as a kid-pleaser to try in the challah mold. Additionally, I am wondering if you’ve ever played around with a potato-based bread option? I would prefer something that is not entirely flour based (including nut flours), if it is possible . . .
“I think there are a lot of positives about it,” Holley says. “It cuts out a lot of processed foods just naturally, like processed grains or added sugar through soft drinks or juice.” And because the diet promotes eating anti-inflammatory foods — like fruits, vegetables, and unsaturated fats in nuts and certain oils — your health could benefit, Holley explains. Cutting out processed foods and sugar will also help lower your risk of certain diseases, like type 2 diabetes and certain cancers, she says. (6)
I just made it using all the the optional ingredients but I didn’t have a food processor so I whipped/mixed everything by hand. One thing I noticed is that the top of the bread cracked unevenly. Could I have over fluffed the egg whites? Maybe creating an artificial cut in the middle could solve that next time? It rose very well and nearly doubled in size, though the size is still a bit small for my liking. I will most likely use 1.5x the amount next time. It smells great and I’m about to chow down on this!

Hi Elana! I just found your website and I’m so glad that I did! I’ve been on a GF diet for about a month after having years of terrible GI problems. I can’t remember when I didn’t have GI issues, and have done a number of elimination diets to figure out the problem. I’ve visited a few gastroenterologists and they haven’t identified anything “wrong” with me. I still haven’t pinpointed it, but overall I feel happier knowing that I’ve omitted something that was such a big part of my life before. Your bread recipe was very much needed since I still have an affinity for bread-like (carb-y) foods. The bread is delicious and SO hearty. I was skeptical at first, but it turns out I’m hooked on the stuff! Unfortunately I didn’t have coconut flour, so I ended up using 2 T of GF flour, it still worked! I have a shipment coming soon and can’t wait to try it out with the CF! Thanks again, I look forward to reading more of your posts even though I’m not a paleo nut! ;)
Gah, do you feel like I say that enough? Haha. But really, the way our bodies respond to certain foods and digestion is so individualized. I think it’ definitely depends on our gut flora, hormones, environment we are living, etc. Which is why I like to make gluten free allergy friendly recipes. Some people need grain free, nut free, others feel better on an egg free or vegan diet, and some are just starting off eating a gluten free diet and are overwhelmed. 

This bread is perfect for everyday use. I have tried a number of grain-free and gluten-free breads, but this is the absolute best recipe I have found BY FAR. I had to adjust the baking temp and time to ensure the middle bakes (I’ve had a number of soggy-middle issues with this), but a baked for for 30min in a 355 oven, it is perfect. It’s a great, fast, easy way for my little girls to get the fat, protien and carbs their bodies need for breakfast. Topped with some preserves, and momma is all set too! Thanks so much!
As of 2016 there are limited data on the metabolic effects on humans eating a Paleo diet, but the data are based on clinical trials that have been too small to have a statistical significance sufficient to allow the drawing of generalizations.[3][6][20][not in citation given] These preliminary trials have found that participants eating a paleo nutrition pattern had better measures of cardiovascular and metabolic health than people eating a standard diet,[3][9] though the evidence is not strong enough to recommend the Paleo diet for treatment of metabolic syndrome.[9] As of 2014 there was no evidence the paleo diet is effective in treating inflammatory bowel disease.[21]

Hi James, Thank you for sharing. Most likely this wasn’t fully cooked if it stuck to the parchment paper, as I never have to grease it, but I did add a note to the post that you could do that to be on the safe side. I think the previous recipe and post were not clear enough on how to make sure that it’s done, so I updated them and hope that will help. I’d love to know if that made a difference if you try it again. But, this bread is more similar to fluffy pre-sliced white bread than a crusty bread, so I still would not expect a crust. If you are looking for a crusty bread, try this almond flour bread instead.
Hi Rosa, thank you so much for sharing your feedback and modifications. The texture you got was definitely because of that. This bread only has 9g of Net Carbs per slice (based on 10 slices per loaf) so it’s pretty low already and I hope you make it with arrowroot next time to compare. Please report back here if you do and let me know how it goes and how do you like it.
Hi Brenda, There are various reasons but the most common one is that coconut flour is extremely absorbent and needs a lot of eggs to offset how much moisture it absorbs. If you used a liquid like milk or water, it would fall apart. That being said, this recipe is not dry or dense. Did you try making it? Whipping the egg whites creates the exact opposite effect and the bread turns out light and fluffy. Hope you’ll give it a try!
Anything that comes in a box, jar, or bag should be avoided on the paleo diet—as should anything that just wasn't consumed back then. That means no grains, dairy, added salt, or legumes (including peanuts, beans, lentils, and soybeans), according to Robb Wolf, a former research biochemist, paleo expert, and author of The Paleo Solution. While potatoes are generally outlawed on the diet, Wolff says they are okay to eat sparingly as long as you earn them through exercise (more on that next). Alcohol and honey are also generally considered paleo no-nos, but red wine tends to be the closest option there is to a paleo drink, and honey is far preferred to table sugar or artificial sweeteners.
There were some recipes I tried that were decent enough and definitely passable as bread-like concoctions, but nothing was stellar. Or even good enough to warrant making a second time (IMHO). And there were also a few loaves that were actually pretty bad in different ways – either the flavor and/or the texture was just off – that ended up only being fit for the garbage (definitely a sad thing). But that’s how we learn, right?
I made this tonight and used 1.5 cups almond flour, 1/2 cup tapioca starch, subbed chia meal for flax meal, subbed avocado oil for coconut oil, and added 1.5 T caraway seeds to give it a bit of a “rye bread taste”. We had it with corned beef tonight and it was very good. I did two mini loafs which took the same amount of cooking time. My husband and older son are usually very picky about paleo breads and they both gave it a thumbs up… I think because they both like the taste of caraway. Thanks for the recipe!
One question, when I released this bread out of the pan there was a very strong ammonia smell coming from the bread. After it cooled this ammonia smell was gone. I’m just curious what could cause that odor? Is it a reaction from the almond flour? I was just caught off guard when I bent over to get a whiff of the freshly baked loaf and it smelled of ammonia!
Almond flour is often considered the “all purpose” flour of the paleo baking world. It’s used to make things like bread, cakes, and cookies with good results. The only caveat I have is that using almond flour alone can result in a dense baked good, so I typically use almond flour (or almond meal) in conjunction with arrowroot starch, tapioca flour, and/or flaxseed meal to lighten up the texture.

In low carb and keto baking, we’re concerned with two things: 1) keeping carbs low, and 2) still achieving a baked good that has great flavor and texture (because if we can’t gag it down there’s just no point, right? Lol). Low carb bread recipes are usually gluten free and grain free (although we’ve seen a couple that use oat fiber), but then the challenge is to get creative to get the right combination of ingredients to yield something that rises properly and tastes good.
I love this recipe, I just tweaked a couple of things to get it how I wanted it. I replaced 1/2 cup of almond flour with an extra 1/2 cup of tapioca starch. I also separated out all but one of the egg whites, and beat them to a soft peak. After mixing the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients, I folded the egg whites in. This helped give it a boost to make it a bit taller and fluffier. The final product was springy and tasty, and better than most gluten free breads I’ve purchased.
Food and Western Disease: Health and nutrition from an evolutionary perspective by Staffan Lindeberg (MD at Lund University in Sweden) is the newest book promoting the paleo diet. It covers the link between diet and disease in the Western world (all major diseases, including cancer, heart disease, obesity, stroke and dementia) and towards a greater knowledge of what can be defined as the optimal human diet. Benefits and risks are detailed. The Amazon reviews are all 5 stars. Especially read Susan Schenck's detailed review. You can read a preview at Google Books
Error msg again, sorry if this is redundant….lilely to not be as flowely, need to care for mom…………but I owe you great thanks…….keep you efforts us………I care for my 87 yr old mum……I keep her bs stable, I keep her contented………she loves your recipes….I am working to protect my husband who has numbers I do not like………I keep cooking to take care of everyoone……thankyou for taking the time to poste……I know my mum will have time defined by God……plan to kleep my spouse by my side so long as God can tolerate his absence………..ok, I am somewhat different…….but, this is about you, not me, so, thankyou for your efforts………………..sleep well………..luckylin
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I made this bread last night and it turned out so delicious and moist! My 2 & 4 year old couldn’t get enough of it either which was so exciting to see. I want to start making this bread for my daughters school lunches but it’s a nut-free school. Could the almond flour be replaced by coconut flour? Or any other flour? If so, whould the measurements change of the ingredients? I am not a baker so I am a bit clueless.
It’s hard to make substitutions, but if I was to experiment with a different nut-free flour I would use pumpkin or sunflower seed flour (same amount). These may be hard to find so you can make your own. The process is the same for making almond flour and I have a video tutorial here: https://livinghealthywithchocolate.com/desserts/how-to-blanch-almonds-and-make-almond-flour-8387/
The Paleo diet has become more and more popular over the years, mimicking our ancient ancestors’ most basic diet of vegetables, meats, fruits, and nuts. The Paleo approach is to stay low in the mainstream processed foods that have filled our grocery store shelves and stick to natural food that’s free of additives. The hardest time to avoid these? Dessert! With these Paleo desserts, you get to avoid the added sugars, get full faster, and typically take in fewer carbohydrates.
This is the best Paleo bread I have ever had!! I have tried quite a few recipes, this one was easy and so delicious. I did do a few things differently, I used coconut oil instead of palm shortening, as that is what I had on hand. And I had no round molds so I put the batter in a glass loaf pan and it worked out just fine for me! Absolutely delicious, thank you, this will be made regularly in my kitchen!!!
Hi, I’ve made this recipe twice and LOVE the taste. However, both times the bread would rise so high in the oven, but as soon as I take it out to cool it deflated and middle sink down. What could’ve gone wrong? Over mixing? I did switch coconut flour to all almond flour instead. Could that be a problem? Please help as I’m anxious to make another batch. Thank you.
This is such an excellent versatile recipe and definitely my favorite gluten-free bread recipe. I find that I’m perfectly satisfied using almond meal that of almond flour. And it has adapted well to any other kind of nut or seed meal I have tried so far. Last week I used all pecan meal is my favorite today taste wise. I also often mix half of another nut meal with half almond meal. Second favorite was half almond meal with half sunflower seed meal the taste was delicious. However the sunflower seed meal did turn green like I did read. . . Morning I may Kallof with all walnut meal and I’m sure it will turn out cause of all the work you did in creating this recipe. Also I never use a food processor I mix it all by hand and it still turns out.
Our bodies need much more protein than the average person consumes. In fact, protein accounts for only 15 percent of the average person’s daily calories, while 19 to 35 percent of the average hunter-gatherer diet was comprised of protein. This was due to the high consumption of meat, seafood, and other animal products prevalent in contemporary approaches to Paleo eating.
This bread does have quite a few ingredients, but you’ll find that most are staple paleo and keto pantry ingredients. In the list below you’ll find details on several ingredients and possible subs. But if possible, please do try and make this recipe without any subs. As out of the 18 permutations we tried, this one really was terrific and the absolute best.
Hi Sara! Hmmm, I’m not sure- I haven’t tried anything else. I don’t think there would be a good sub for almond flour. I do have another sandwich bread recipe that is nut free and paleo- it’s in my ebook. It only takes 1/2 cup cassava flour! You can find it here if you are interested. https://paleoglutenfree.com/shop/quick-easy-paleo-breads/ Sorry I don’t have a good sub for the almond!
An Interview with Ward Nicholson now has three parts on the web. Good overview of man's diet over the past 65 million years. Long but highly recommended reading. First published in Chet Day's "Health & Beyond" newsletter. Now part of a very comprehensive Beyond Vegetarianism site. Every argument that your vegetarian friends use to avoid meat for health reasons is debunked here.
Deadly Harvest: The Intimate Relationship Between Our Health and Our Food by Geoff Bond. The author is a nutritional anthropologist who has for years investigated both foods of the past and our prehistoric eating habits. Using the latest scientific research and studies of primitive tribal lifestyles, Bond first explains the actual diet that our ancestors followed--a diet that was and still is in harmony with the human species. He then describes how the foods in today's diets disrupt our biochemistry and digestive system, leading to health disorders such as allergies, arthritis, cancer, diabetes, heart disease, osteoporosis, obesity, and more. Most important, he explains the appropriate measures we can take to avoid these diseases--and even beat them back--through healthy eating. The conclusions of Deadly Harvest are that disease control happens by eating a strict low-glycemic diet, lowering the percentage of body fat you carry around, eat a diet consisting of mostly non-starchy plant-based foods, eat a low-fat diet with ample amounts of omega-3 fats, maintain good colon health, engage in regular physical activity, get some daily sunshine, and reduce chronic stress. If you do this, then diseases like cancer, heart disease, digestive problems, allergies, autoimmune diseases, brain diseases, diabetes, and obesity can be avoided. The Amazon reviews average to 5 stars.
We do the honeyville and get it from Amazon. My Holistic practitioner is fanatical about food and food that has been grown with contaminated water and thus she gets all her food tested. This is one of the only ones she says is clean from contaminates from pesticides to hidden mercury and arsenic from contaminated water, etc. Whether it’ll always be that way who knows.
The only downside is that it is small and we eat almost all of it in a day! I’d love to make several loaves at a time and freeze them. Have you tried freezing it? How do you wrap it and how long does it last in the freezer? Thanks so much for this recipe, it’s made going paleo so much easier for my family, especially when I think about school lunches!

ok my bread did not quite look like this.it had ammonia scents. serious…. seriously working recipes….open to suggestion…my husband’s mum was a a baker…..I fail at every attempt to provide. Your assistance is helpful.thx I am the ever so lucky lin..plan to stay lucky….(ps do this b/c my bs is borderline.fasting bs +90……..and though, my spouse refuses to acknowledge it he has issues as wel).180 after a mango whatever…I love this man, and plan to keep him with me. forever….pls assist..so tired of numbers that are compromised….bull ..we are a unique community because we care…many others are impacted, they just do not connect… We are the only people who appear to care about what elevated glucose does to people….I care for my mum…….she is blind…..confused……multiple strokes..pls, keep helping…Mom was a pilot, a photograhpher, an independent woman from the age of 15. Now, she lves in a bedroom, vision gone, and momory deplleted…….life does not have to end this way. She loves your recipes……I prep them……you have made her happy…love, lucky lin………..
Thank you so much for this recipe! I had some with my egg for breakfast and it went really well as the bread has a slightly ‘eggy’ taste. It came out exactly as your photo. Some people asked for nutrition info and I have looked at just the calories and protein which are 1096 calories per loaf and 101g protein. Obviously the slice amounts vary on how many slices you cut it into – for me 14 slices so 113 calories and 7g protein per slice.

People who eat Paleo are also missing out on fiber, vitamins and minerals that come from a diet that includes healthy grains and dairy products. Some nutrients that someone on a Paleo diet may be lacking are iron, zinc calcium, folate, thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B12 and phosphorus. The UK Association of Dieticians ranked the Paleo Diet as one of the five worst celebrity diets to avoid in 2015 because cutting foods, without a good substitution, can compromise good health.


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I don’t have dietary issues and do not adhere to a strict paleo diet. I do, however, have a raging sweet tooth that I try to keep in check by eating a low glycemic diet day to day, and limit high glycemic foods to those times when I am deliberately treating myself to “sweets”. This bread is more the texture of “quick bread” (like banana, or zucchini), which was a surprise. Its very tasty and satisfying, almost rich. This bread will be a good delivery system for peanut butter and bananas or soft boiled eggs.

Speaking from experience, you won’t be able to taste even the slightest coconut flavor in the bread, especially with just a small amount! Coconut flour has very unique properties compared to other flours (much more absorbent) and can’t be easily substituted. With how many tries it can take to get paleo baked goods to to have the right taste/texture, I recommend following Michelle’s recipe as written! 🙂
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