Grass-fed beef is often highlighted on the diet, which is promoted to contain more omega-3 fats than conventional beef (due to being fed grass instead of grain). It does contain small amounts of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), a precursor to EPA and DHA. However, only a small proportion of ALA can be converted in the body to long-chain omega-3 fatty acids (EPA and DHA). The amount of omega-3 is also highly variable depending on the exact feeding regimen and differences in fat metabolism among cattle breeds. [3] In general, the amount of omega-3 in grass-fed beef is much lower than that in oily marine fish. [3] Cooked salmon contains 1000-2000 mg of EPA/DHA per 3-ounce portion, whereas 3 ounces of grass-fed beef contains about 20-200 mg of ALA.
I have made these so many times in the last few weeks and have shared the recipe with many friends. They are delicious and so easy! I don’t really like the taste of Palm shortening, so I used coconut oil, softening it in the microwave, not melting. But don’t put it in wet ingredients because the coldness from the eggs will harden it again. Mix with dry ingredients, working out all the lumps with hands and distributing it evenly. I double the recipe and then separate it. I have added rosemary or dill or jalapenos/bacon/cheese to batter. So delicious. I am going to try more variations and add other herbs as I go. Thank you so much for such a great recipe. I was missing bread and these are perfect for chicken salad, tuna salad, turkey burgers, etc. And…. I save so much money because the gluten free breads in the grocery store are so expensive.

Hi Anita, I double checked my carton egg whites. 3/4 cup of egg whites is equivalent to 4 large whole eggs, not 4 large egg whites. Mine has a chart for converting whole eggs, and the conversion for egg whites only is below the chart. It says 2 tablespoons of liquid egg whites are equivalent to the egg white of 1 whole egg. So, 12 large egg whites would be 24 tablespoons, or 1 1/2 cups as written in the recipe. Hope this helps!
Diana Schwarzbein is another M.D. that has come to realize that low carb is what works. See reviews at The Schwarzbein Principle. The book is based on her work with insulin-resistant patients with Type II diabetes. She concludes that low-fat diets cause heart attacks, eating fat makes you lose body fat, and it's important to eat high-cholesterol foods every day.

Hi Howard, You’re right that this bread doesn’t rise much – the volume comes mostly from whipping the egg whites. If the whites fell too much, the bread might not be tall enough. But even if they didn’t, it might still be shorter than some other tall bread loaves. Feel free to multiply the recipe by 1.5 if you prefer a taller loaf. I’m glad you liked the flavor and texture!
I’ve lived with food intolerances for about 30 years so I’m happy experimenting with all sorts of different ingredients. However, I’ve recently realised I have a problem with gluten and whilst I can make breads such as this one successfully I’ve never found a substitute that gives me the elasticity of gluten (I am unable to eat gluten free flour and having found out the ingredient that gives it the elasticity I no longer want to eat it). Have you ever found a flour or a combination of ingredients that gives the elasticity to make something like pitta bread? May I say that I wish I’d had access to your blog, ideas and cook books 30 years ago, they’re fantastic and my life would have been so much easier. Thank you for making the time to both experiment and share your ideas with others.
Whenever I come across a recipe and I want to convert it to grams I use the amount on say my bag of almond flour and calculate it out. My almond flour weighs out to be 112 grams per cup so for this recipe you would use 224 grams of almond flour (I use superfine Kirkland brand from Costco and I’ve also used Bob’s Red Mill superfine and they both work equally well). The 2 tablespoons of coconut flour is a small amount so I wouldn’t bother weighing that out. As for the flax seed, I buy mine whole and measure accordingly and grind in my coffee grinder.
Hi Eva, That’s awesome that you are helping your son this way. I haven’t tried this with other tools, but you could probably use either the blender or the food processor. The key is to pulse in step 5, not just constantly blend, so that the whites don’t fully break down. Other than that, it should be pretty similar. As for the yolks, if you don’t want to make creme brulee, I usually just put a couple extras into an omelet (or breakfast casserole, or any other dish requiring cooked eggs) mixed with whole eggs.
I would like to try this Paleo recipe as it really does look like a healthy one! We appreciate all your hard work “tweaking” these recipes to get them just right! However, I would like to comment that some of your recipe “supporters” live in Canada and we can’t get some of the brand named items you mention at times. Perhaps for this reason some have asked re substitutions. As an example, I made your Chocolate Prune Bars the other day but wasn’t sure about the NuNaturals Stevia. I didn’t know whether it was a powder or a liquid, and since we don’t have that brand here I took a “leap in the dark” and used SweetLeaf Vanilla Creme since there was vanilla in the recipe anyway. I’m sure yours turned out better than mine but I’m going to try again. Also, wasn’t sure whether the chocolate chips were semi-sweet or unsweetened, but just used what I had, which was bittersweet. I guess that item is pretty well a personal choice. Just thought I would let you know that we do have some different brand names in Canada which can sometimes confuse the issue.
Ohhhh! Almond flour and coconut flour! I love it. I have made bread with just coconut flour, and love the texture, but find it too sweet. The almond flour bread I love the taste, but it’s a bit dry. This recipe sounds like a great match. I can’t wait to try it. Thanks for working so hard to find such amazing recipes and then sharing them with the world!

Maya, this is a beautiful looking bread. I’m going to try it, but before I do, I’d like to know if you have ever tried doubling the recipe. It seems that it would work–based on the fact that my almond flour bread that I have made for years uses 3 1/4 cups flour, and turns out pretty well. (I’m pretty content with my recipe, but admit that yours looks better due to the whiteness and it appears to have more air bubbles, indicating it’s probably lighter.) If I don’t hear from you, I’ll probably go ahead and double it, and use a 9×5 pan–wish me luck. 

Hi, Elana. Just wanted to let you know that I love this bread recipe. I make it all the time. Not long ago, I had an epic fail because I forgot to let my ingredients come to room temperature. I had quite an issue with tunneling. The bread was unusable for slicing, but I decided to cube it and dry it in the oven so I’d have some gluten-free bread for stuffing. I used it to convert my treasured cornbread stuffing recipe to a gluten-free version, and it turned out great. My recipe will be featured on my blog(www.gardenforestfield.com), with a link to your bread recipe, on Monday, Nov. 18th. Thanks for all you do.

OMG-made this recipe for fun(I have no dietary restricions about gluten or grains or any allergies) Followed recipe exactly and used three 4″mini springform pans. These buns came out awesome! Texture and taste like real actual bread! Eating one wih chicken salad as I type! I’ve tried other bread recipes before using almond or coconut flours and never came out worthy of the effort and cost involved but these are amazing! I love that it is a small batch using simple minimal ingredients so u dont end up with a ton of something u can’t eat fast enough before it goes bad(not that these would even last that long if I quadrupled the recipe…!)

According to the model from the evolutionary discordance hypothesis, "[M]any chronic diseases and degenerative conditions evident in modern Western populations have arisen because of a mismatch between Stone Age genes and modern lifestyles."[26] Advocates of the modern Paleo diet have formed their dietary recommendations based on this hypothesis. They argue that modern humans should follow a diet that is nutritionally closer to that of their Paleolithic ancestors.
The NY Times had a blog article on Good News on Saturated Fat which is reporting on Gary Taubes's interpretation of the new report in The New England Journal of Medicine on a two-year diet experiment in Israel. A followup is the post The Fat Fight Goes On where Gary rebuts the arguments against the study. And here's a good interview with Taubes (and includes a good summary): Gary Taubes on Cold Fusion, Good Nutrition and What Makes Bad (and Good) Science.
WOW! I’ve tried so many other paleo bread recipes but felt like they either tasted like almond cake or banana bread (which is great if i want a sweet!) This is Super easy, super quick and great! In the excitement i even forgot to convert to Australian measurements and it Still worked out great! Bacon and eggs can now have some bread with it and tastes great with any paleo friendly nut spread/butter! Thanks for sharing.
Here is a way to keep Paleo fun by making a batch of Paleo pretzels. It gets boring sometimes eating a certain way, and adding novelty treats like this really makes it seem like you’re not on a diet at all. Half the fun is making these, as you don’t have to stick to the conventional pretzel shape, and can wind them into any design you wish. The other half is eating them, and there’s no worries here, since all of the ingredients conform to the parameters set by the Paleo OK foods list, a combination of coconut flour and almond flour.
I’m not a believer in vegan or Paleo diets. I believe in a healthy diet that leans somewhat in the vegetarian direction and I just became convinced of the need to eliminate wheat from my diet. I applaud this website and the author for providing me with the bread alternatives I was looking for. I also appreciated the open eclectic attitude of the author in including some items recommended by vegans. Still, I believe red meat should be avoided . Thank You.
For the dry bits, I would use a flour sifter or a sieve depending on what you have in the kitchen. Adding in the wet would require a spoon. The food processor simply takes out the labor of mixing it by hand. I haven’t made this one yet (tomorrow I will) but I’ve made banana bread more times than I can remember and only once has it been done in a food processor.
To get an idea of what that means, we turned to the experts, including Loren Cordain, PhD, a professor emeritus at Colorado State University in Fort Collins, Colorado, and the author of The Paleo Diet; Erin Holley, RD, of Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in Columbus, Ohio; and Lona Sandon, PhD, RD, an assistant professor of clinical nutrition at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas.
The Paleo Diet focuses on the mantra that if a caveman didn’t eat it, modern man shouldn’t either. This encompasses processed foods; any foods that have been harvested by the use of ranching or agriculture, such as grains or cane sugar; legumes, such as lentils, beans, peanuts and peas; potatoes; and dairy products, because early man didn’t raise cattle. All fruits and vegetables must be organic, and salt must be limited, because early man didn’t salt his food.
Buried in the middle of The Revised Metabolic Oncolytic Regimen for Effecting Lysis in Solid Tumors one can find their diet recommendations for tumor control. It has a paleo diet orientation. Protein is 35%, preferably Omega 3 rich. Carbohydrates (also 35%) are only vegetables and fruit, no beans, bread, potatoes, or any grain. Then dietary and supplemental forms of fat should provide 20-30% of (daily) calories.
Maya, this is a beautiful looking bread. I’m going to try it, but before I do, I’d like to know if you have ever tried doubling the recipe. It seems that it would work–based on the fact that my almond flour bread that I have made for years uses 3 1/4 cups flour, and turns out pretty well. (I’m pretty content with my recipe, but admit that yours looks better due to the whiteness and it appears to have more air bubbles, indicating it’s probably lighter.) If I don’t hear from you, I’ll probably go ahead and double it, and use a 9×5 pan–wish me luck.
In the long term, you have to be sure you’re getting calcium and other nutrients you’re missing by not having dairy products and certain grains. Some paleo-approved foods, such as salmon and spinach, contain calcium, so you have to be sure you’re including them in your diet. It would be a good idea to check with a registered dietitian, too, to make sure you’re meeting your calcium and other nutrient needs.

I am a complete fan of yours and have been trying various recipes over the years that have loved by my family! I tried making this bread today. It was cooked all the way through but looked rather pale. I wanted to put it back in the oven a little longer but feared that this plan would make things way to dry. Any thoughts with what I can do differently next time?
One flour you’ll definitely want to familiarize yourself with on Paleo is almond flour. It comes in handy in dozens of different baking applications and it provides a pretty darn good substitute to general purpose flour. This almond loaf was made using almond flour and a few select additional ingredients like coconut oil and apple cider vinegar. This recipe is good for showing you how easy it is to come up with a loaf of Paleo bread. It isn’t exactly rocket science so don’t be afraid to try it out if you’ve never made bread from scratch before.
Arrowroot Starch: You may also see arrowroot starch labeled as arrowroot flour or arrowroot powder. It’s made from tubers traditionally from a plant called Maranta arundinacea, but commercially it’s often found as a mixture of various starches, including starch from the cassava root. Similar to tapioca starch, arrowroot starch is used in paleo baking to improve the texture of baked goods, lightening them up a bit, and help with browning.
Made this tonight, and it came out delicious!! I subbed in grapeseed oil for the coconut oil, and used ground chia seed instead of the flax, because they are what I had on hand, and it is wonderful. Nice “whole grain” texture and nutty taste, so yummy just spread with good butter. Will definitely be making this again! I’m mostly Paleo, and LOVE your almond flour and coconut flour recipes, delicious and grain free. Thank you so much.
If you have more questions on specific foods, we’ve included a comprehensive list of paleo diet foods below. We’ve provided a list of the foods that are allowed on the paleo diet. We’ve also broken this list down into the specific food groups, so you can see which meats, vegetables, fruits, nuts, and fats are on the paleo diet. In addition to all of that, we’ve also included a comprehensive list of foods not allowed on the paleo diet.

The last thing I can think of is the brand of almond flour you’re using and how you’re measuring your ingredients. Not all brands of almond flour are good for baking. Some are coarser and more oily then others, and this can affect the texture of baked goods. I always recommend people to use the same ingredients as I list below the recipes so that there’s no fail. If you can’t find the brands of almond flour I recommend, maybe you can order it online. My favorite brands are by Honeyville, Welbee’s and Nuts.com. Honeyville is now sold at Costco. Let me know if this helps.


I just tried this for the first time tonight and followed the recipe exactly. I bought all of your recommended brands of ingredients, including the right sized pan. The texture is great (though the bread is still hot out of the oven!) and the taste is pretty good. Let’s face it, it’s not yeasted/gluten bread. But it’s definitely a very acceptable substitute. I really appreciate the nutritional content of this bread. Most of the commercial gluten-free products make me crazy with their nutritional emptiness. Looking forward to trying more of your recipes.
The data for Cordain's book only came from six contemporary hunter-gatherer groups, mainly living in marginal habitats.[37] One of the studies was on the !Kung, whose diet was recorded for a single month, and one was on the Inuit.[37][38][39] Due to these limitations, the book has been criticized as painting an incomplete picture of the diets of Paleolithic humans.[37] It has been noted that the rationale for the diet does not adequately account for the fact that, due to the pressures of artificial selection, most modern domesticated plants and animals differ drastically from their Paleolithic ancestors; likewise, their nutritional profiles are very different from their ancient counterparts. For example, wild almonds produce potentially fatal levels of cyanide, but this trait has been bred out of domesticated varieties using artificial selection. Many vegetables, such as broccoli, did not exist in the Paleolithic period; broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, and kale are modern cultivars of the ancient species Brassica oleracea.[29]
CN3&trad; combines 3 forms of Creatine into a stimulant-free 3-in-1 Creatine complex! Providing 6.25 total grams consisting of micronized Creatine Monohydrate, Creatine Nitrate, and Creatine Hydrochloride. CN3&trad; is an amazing product to be taken before, during, or after a workout. Looking to amplify Strength & Pumps? CN3&trad; has got you covered!
Five roots, both bitter and sweet, are staples in the Hiwi diet, as are palm nuts and palm hearts, several different fruits, a wild legume named Campsiandra comosa, and honey produced by several bee species and sometimes by wasps. A few Hiwi families tend small, scattered and largely unproductive fields of plantains, corn and squash. At neighboring cattle ranches in a town about 30 kilometers away, some Hiwi buy rice, noodles, corn flour and sugar. Anthropologists and tourists have also given the Hiwi similar processed foods as gifts (see illustration at top).

Most Paleo dieters of today do none of this, with the exception of occasional hunting trips or a little urban foraging. Instead, their diet is largely defined by what they do not do: most do not eat dairy or processed grains of any kind, because humans did not invent such foods until after the Paleolithic; peanuts, lentils, beans, peas and other legumes are off the menu, but nuts are okay; meat is consumed in large quantities, often cooked in animal fat of some kind; Paleo dieters sometimes eat fruit and often devour vegetables; and processed sugars are prohibited, but a little honey now and then is fine.

Thank you for this amazing recipe! I didn’t have rings so I used 3 of my 4″ pyrex glass dishes to make 3 buns. I love the texture and the taste is mild. I initially made them for burger buns but now I see they can be so versatile – egg sammies, toast with jam, eggs benedict, mini pizzas, burgers, and so on. Can’t wait to make them again – this is going to be a staple in my house! Thank you!!

NOTICE: The information contained or presented on this website is for educational purposes only. Information on this site is NOT intended to serve as a substitute for diagnosis, treatment, or advice from a qualified, licensed medical professional. The facts presented are offered as information only - not medical advice - and in no way should anyone infer that we or anyone appearing in any content on this website are practicing medicine. Any diet, health, or nutritional program you undertake should be discussed with your doctor or other licensed medical professional. Seek the advice of a medical professional for proper application of ANY material on this site to your specific situation.
I buy whole golden flax seeds. I grind them very fine to use them so my flax seed meal is always fresh and not rancid. I have never tried it in bread so am going to give it a shot with this recipe. Hope it turns out. There are so many glowing comments for this bread. I don’t eat grains and usually just use cloud bread which I love but my grandchildren would prefer a “slice” of bread. Do you think this would turn out in a pullman pan?
Paleo Comfort Foods: Homestyle Cooking in a Gluten-Free Kitchen by Julie Sullivan Mayfield and Charles Mayfield. Implementing paleo guidelines and principles in this book (no grains, no gluten, no legumes, no dairy), the Mayfields give you 100+ recipes and full color photos with entertaining stories throughout. The recipes in Paleo Comfort Foods can help individuals and families alike lose weight, eat healthy and achieve optimum fitness, making this way of eating sustainable, tasty and fun. The many reviews at Amazon are basically flawless. The sole complaint is over the lack of nutritional information. But there is no counting on the paleo diet and its inclusion would have been inappropriate. Published September 10, 2011.
I’ve been working on this Paleo Bread recipe for several months and have tested it a couple of dozen times. In fact, every time I create a recipe I test each and every ingredient addition or subtraction. That’s why I think it’s kinda funny when people leave comments below recipes (or on Instagram) asking how such and such ingredient substitution will turn out.

The Paleolithic or “Paleo” diet seeks to address 21st century ills by revisiting the way humans ate during the Paleolithic era more than 2 million years ago. Paleo proponents state that because our genetics and anatomy have changed very little since the Stone Age, we should eat foods available during that time to promote good health. Our predecessors used simple stone tools that were not advanced enough to grow and cultivate plants, so they hunted, fished, and gathered wild plants for food. If they lived long enough, they were believed to experience less modern-day diseases like diabetes, cancer, and heart disease because of a consistent diet of lean meats and plant foods along with a high level of physical activity from intensive hunting. However, the life expectancy of our predecessors was only a fraction of that of people today.
Hi Valerie, so funny, I just got asked this question! 🙂 Here’s what I said, “…almond flour is a lot less absorbent than coconut flour (like A LOT). I know a few people have tried using oat flour with success, but I worry that almond flour would not be sufficient for absorbing the almond butter and creating a nice, firm texture. I’d recommend starting with about 3/4 cup almond flour, and experimenting as needed.” Hope this helps!
So.. let’s talk about the needed part. Quick, what’s the one thing you can’t live without, food wise? That you NEED!! Here’s what I hear a lot when I explain the Paleo or grain free style of eating. “Oh my Goodness, how can I live without bread or a good sandwich bread?” Well ya, bread is so delicious and I don’t always make paleo bread, but when I do, it’s usually for a good reason.

I just made this today, and my husband, toddler, and I all loved it! We used ours for cheese and tomato sandwiches, and my husband managed to eat about half of the loaf before it even cooled. Like another person mentioned, I had to bake mine longer, but for me it was nearly twice as long (I’m at a relatively high altitude, maybe that’s why?). As yet another person said, it will now be a staple in our home too!
×