This recipe is FANTASTIC! I think was my first attempt a time grain free bread and I hit the jackpot! No need to look farther. I followed another reader’s suggestion to beat egg whites separately then fold in at the end. I used Bob Mill’s super fine almond flour. Everything else I followed exactly as primed and cooked an extra 8 minutes for a total of 33 mins. THANK YOU SO MUCH for such an excellent recipe!
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I had to make some changes. I’m allergic to chicken eggs so I used duck eggs. I don’t use flaxseed; it’s an endocrine disruptor but I had hemp seed powder so I used that. I also have chia seed to grind so I will try that next time. Baking time was 10 minutes longer, maybe because of the duck eggs. Slices beautifully and is delicious! Thank you, Elana, for looking out for us Paleos!
We do the honeyville and get it from Amazon. My Holistic practitioner is fanatical about food and food that has been grown with contaminated water and thus she gets all her food tested. This is one of the only ones she says is clean from contaminates from pesticides to hidden mercury and arsenic from contaminated water, etc. Whether it’ll always be that way who knows.
For the dry bits, I would use a flour sifter or a sieve depending on what you have in the kitchen. Adding in the wet would require a spoon. The food processor simply takes out the labor of mixing it by hand. I haven’t made this one yet (tomorrow I will) but I’ve made banana bread more times than I can remember and only once has it been done in a food processor.
Made it again to nights ago. Subsituted sour cream for the yogurt. And I had found a three pound bag of the Honeyville almond flour at Costco. (It was under S20 if I remember correctly.) The bread came out so wonderful. The flour made a huge difference. Next time I make the bread I will again separate the eggs though. I only have a loaf pan that is 9 by 5 inches so the bread does come out a little flatter than it should. Between the correct flour and fluffing the egg whites it should be very close to a regular loaf of bread.

It’s not magic—these bread recipes really are Paleo-compliant. They use ingredients like almond flour, tapioca flour, and flaxseeds to make it work. And while it’s probably not great to just swap out your regular bread for one of these if you want to get into the ~true spirit~ of the plan, they’re a great option to have in your back pocket when that toast craving hits hard.
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While the diet as a whole hasn't been well studied, the benefits of cutting packaged foods from your diet could be huge. According to the Harvard School of Public Health, three quarters of the average American's sodium intake (which is almost double what it should be!) comes from commercially prepared foods. And, one Public Health Nutrition study found that people who cook at least five times a week are 47% more likely to be alive 10 years later compared to those who rely more on processed foods.

Transfer bread dough to prepared loaf pan, using a wet spatula to even out the top. Cover with a kitchen towel and place in a warm draft-free space for 50-60 minutes until the dough has risen just past the top of the loaf pan. How long it takes depends on your altitude, temperature and humidity- so keep an eye out for it every 15 minutes or so. And keep in mind that if you use a larger loaf pan it won't rise past the top. 
Alcohol is a no-no if you are strict paleo. Beer is made from grains, and liquor also contains traces of gluten. But, good news for cider-lovers: most hard ciders are gluten-free, so they are allowed. Check the label to be sure. Red wine is more accepted in the paleo community because it contains the antioxidant resveratrol, but sorry chardonnay lovers, white wine is technically not allowed.
Like many diets, the risks that come from eating the Paleo Diet is due to an imbalanced diet. For example, the Paleo Diet requires eating a large amount of meat. This can lead to excess consumption of saturated fat and cholesterol. “Those that follow this pattern of eating do not account for the differences in fatty acid composition of the meat of the animals today versus the composition 10,000 years ago." Malik told Live Science. "During our ancestors’ days, the fatty acid composition of livestock consisted of higher omega-3 fats— fats that actually improve our health. However, due to differences in the way we feed and raise livestock today, the meat tends to be higher in saturated fat.”

The Paleo Diet focuses on the mantra that if a caveman didn’t eat it, modern man shouldn’t either. This encompasses processed foods; any foods that have been harvested by the use of ranching or agriculture, such as grains or cane sugar; legumes, such as lentils, beans, peanuts and peas; potatoes; and dairy products, because early man didn’t raise cattle. All fruits and vegetables must be organic, and salt must be limited, because early man didn’t salt his food.
I’ve been on a Keto diet for 8 weeks now and haven’t eaten any bread. This recipe should come with a warning – extra willpower required! ‘Cool in the pan for 2 hours’. Are you kidding me? It smelled so delicious I had to have a slice still warm, with butter. It was delicious. Next time I’ll be good and follow the instructions. Can’t wait to try the others. Thank you Elana!
I just wanted to say that I made this bread and it came out fantastic! I’m very pleased with it. It held together nicely and had a good taste. I felt it was also a great base for maybe some nut additions or raisin bread for a sweet twist. I’m definitely going to be playing around with this recipe. It was so EASY to put together too! Just perfect for a busy family trying to stay healthy and feel good. Thanks so much Elana!
Thank you so much for this! I have always LOVED bread and made my own before going Paleo earlier this year. Now my husband asked me to bake him Zucchini Blueberry Bread, my absolute favorite, more of a cake than bread. I knew it would be irresistible for me. The day I made his bread, I found your post (again). You said we could add fruit, so I added shredded zucchini and blueberries. AWSOME! Although it appeared to be done after 90 secs., there was a raw section inside. I put it all on a plate and microwaved a bit longer. What a great make over for an old-time favorite. Thanks again.

As I type I have my first loaf of Paleo Bread in the oven. I live in South Africa where we apparently don’t have any flax meal…so I imported some from your side of the world and can’t wait to taste the results. My daughter, who suffers with severe juvenile arthritis and for whom we all made the conversion to Paleo, and I made it together and experimented with your silver dollar pancakes for fun at the same time. Those were delicious and enjoyed with blueberries and a bit of honey.
Ok, I did mine a little different. I can’t eat the almond flour so I substituted non glutton Oat flour and I also added chia seeds. I wasn’t able to get the right sized pan, mine is the larger one, so I noticed that the bread wasn’t going to be very high, so …. I made another batch of bread, added it to the lower layer and cooked. Oh wow!! So good!! But I can’t eat it all at once. Poo! Anyway, don’t be afraid to use the bigger pan, just double the recipe.
I just made the paleo bread & it smells delicious. I did make a mistake in my haste & added baking powder instead of soda. So this batch is getting 1 1/2 tsp of both. I didn’t have the size pan you used so am using a regular loaf pan but it isn’t squatty at all! I checked internal temp & it was close to 170. Can’t wait to try it. Thanks for sharing your recipes – you are a gem!
Whenever I come across a recipe and I want to convert it to grams I use the amount on say my bag of almond flour and calculate it out. My almond flour weighs out to be 112 grams per cup so for this recipe you would use 224 grams of almond flour (I use superfine Kirkland brand from Costco and I’ve also used Bob’s Red Mill superfine and they both work equally well). The 2 tablespoons of coconut flour is a small amount so I wouldn’t bother weighing that out. As for the flax seed, I buy mine whole and measure accordingly and grind in my coffee grinder.
I would like to try this Paleo recipe as it really does look like a healthy one! We appreciate all your hard work “tweaking” these recipes to get them just right! However, I would like to comment that some of your recipe “supporters” live in Canada and we can’t get some of the brand named items you mention at times. Perhaps for this reason some have asked re substitutions. As an example, I made your Chocolate Prune Bars the other day but wasn’t sure about the NuNaturals Stevia. I didn’t know whether it was a powder or a liquid, and since we don’t have that brand here I took a “leap in the dark” and used SweetLeaf Vanilla Creme since there was vanilla in the recipe anyway. I’m sure yours turned out better than mine but I’m going to try again. Also, wasn’t sure whether the chocolate chips were semi-sweet or unsweetened, but just used what I had, which was bittersweet. I guess that item is pretty well a personal choice. Just thought I would let you know that we do have some different brand names in Canada which can sometimes confuse the issue.
A special note on dairy: I made this bread with dairy (butter and greek plain yogurt) so technically some people would go against it being called Paleo. With the knowladge we now have today we should know that there are many benefits to consuming dairy made from organic grass fed animals. Butter is an extremely good source of fat and loaded with vitamin A, D and K, and Conjugated Linoleic Acid. Yogurt contains live and active bacteria that are beneficial and keep your digestive system clean and provide food for the friendly bacteria that reside there. On top of that, the live active probiotic bacteria in yogurt can rev up your immune system and reduce your risk of yeast infection, prevent allergy symptoms and naturally increase your metabolism. Not all yogurts are made the same though, so you need to look for these words on the label:  “contain active cultures”, “active yogurt cultures”, or “living yogurt cultures”.
I followed the recipe to a tee, used all recommended ingredients. I’ve attempted making it twice, the first time I didn’t have a food processor and that was a complete fail. The second time, today, I bought a food processor and attempted it again. The egg whites were fluffy but never got to stiff peaks… maybe my eggs were too cold? Anyway, I baked for 30 mins, and it wasn’t even golden brown on the top so I didn’t put the foil on time and cooked it another 20 mins. I just pulled it out about 20 mins ago and it is golden brown. However, it is a very moist almost like a banana bread texture. I just popped it back in the oven hoping it will “dry up”. Any recommendations? Do I need to cook for and hour ?

While I haven’t made this recipe, I’ve used flaxmeal in a lot of muffin recipes, and on a occasion I’ve noticed those same gossamer-type strings after a few days. My best guess is it has something to do with flax, although I’m not sure what causes them to develop. Some recipes I use flaxmeal in never develop the strings, and some do, but it definitely only happens in breads where I use flaxmeal. I think the food is still safe to eat though! I wish I knew exactly what causes it too…
Worried, before I made this recipe I calculated the calories. Because just because something is healthy doesn’t mean you can eat as much as you want! I have an 8×4 inch loaf pan that it is baking in. 1/2 inch slices for an 8 inch pan are 134 calories per slice. Can’t wait to taste it when it’s done. I hope those slices are filling because I have a feeling they will be small.
Paleo bread fantastic, I truly believe this is the best I’ve ever made, I used Tupelo honey and Braggs raw unfiltered vinegar and it really masked the over egginess that sometimes comes with paleo bread, it toasted up great, thanks for all your hard work you give such great alternatives for a grain free diet, love the date nut bar it’s always a hit at work.

There is little argument over the health benefits of fruits and vegetables. They are chock-full of vitamins, minerals, fiber and antioxidants. The only caveat for paleo dieters is that some vegetables are starchy (e.g., potatoes) and some fruits are higher in sugar (e.g., bananas). So, if you are trying to lose weight or watch your blood sugar levels, eat these in moderation. In fact, potatoes are banned from some versions of the diet.
The Paleo Diet focuses on the mantra that if a caveman didn’t eat it, modern man shouldn’t either. This encompasses processed foods; any foods that have been harvested by the use of ranching or agriculture, such as grains or cane sugar; legumes, such as lentils, beans, peanuts and peas; potatoes; and dairy products, because early man didn’t raise cattle. All fruits and vegetables must be organic, and salt must be limited, because early man didn’t salt his food.
Oils are trickier. Loren Cordain, Ph.D., founder of The Paleo Diet Movement, breaks down which oils are healthy on the paleo diet: olive, walnut, flaxseed, macadamia, avocado and coconut oils are all allowed because they were gathered directly from the plant. While our hunter-gatherer ancestors probably did not consume flaxseed oil, it is allowed because of its content of high alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), a type of heart-healthy, anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty acid.
Joel Runyon is the founder of Ultimate Paleo Guide and CEO of Paleo Meal Plans. He's a precision nutrition, and Gym Jones Level 1 certified, and helped millions of people get healthy and lose weight since 2012. Joel is also an ultra runner and endurance athlete - and in 2017, he became the the youngest person to run an ultra marathon on every continent in the world to build 7 schools with Pencils of Promise in developing countries.Follow him on Twitter, Instagram, Athlinks and read his full bio here.
Just made my 3rd loaf. My technique has been improving each time so I am getting a better result! I had never baked anything before like this and there is an art involved. But the deliciousness has never been absent… the mixture of these ingredients has been amazing. Just going from Salvador Dali bread to Leonardo Divinci for style is the new goal!
I made this bread twice. The first time I followed your recipe exactly, but it came out dry and sort of tasteless. I think it’s because of my elevation and how dry the climate is here, so I added about a 1/4 c maple syrup the second time I made it and it’s perfect! I really like this recipe, and I hope others at high and dry climates don’t give up on it if they have the same problem.
Made this bread last night to go with our homemade soup. We really liked it. I didn’t have greek yogurt so I used 1/4 cup whole milk yogurt and 1/4 cup sour cream. I also added a tiny bit of honey for sweetness. It turned out beautiful! Baked for 35 minutes. Have made many other gluten free breads and some were terrible and some just O.K. , but this is the best one we have tried. Great recipe! Can’t wait to try it toasted. Thanks so much!
Alina Bradford is a contributing writer for Live Science. Over the past 16 years, Alina has covered everything from Ebola to androids while writing health, science and tech articles for major publications. She has multiple health, safety and lifesaving certifications from Oklahoma State University. Alina's goal in life is to try as many experiences as possible. To date, she has been a volunteer firefighter, a dispatcher, substitute teacher, artist, janitor, children's book author, pizza maker, event coordinator and much more.
Wow – great bread recipe, let alone paleo! Thank you! After reading other posts I doubled the recipe and whipped my egg whites to soft peaks, folding in gently at the end. Didn’t have enough flax so used combo of chia and flax. This made 2 good sized, lovely light high topped loaves, topped with nigella and sesame seeds (reminiscent of my favourite turkish bread from the old days). What an amazing taste and texture this bread has – will experiment with it now – I think it will be yummy with some fresh rosemary chopped and folded through or maybe lemon thyme and goats cheese feta…..
Thank you Lexi for this awesome, super quick recipe!!! I have been trying out so many different kinds of quick breads with clean ingredients and somehow they take longer. This is will our go to bread, so thank you!! I have tried them twice and both times were awesome! Second time I tried a little variation with adding some rolled oat flour and it did not change it in any noticeable manner. Apparently too much of almonds have disadvantages on the body. I will continue experimenting with adding a little bit of other flours but big THANK YOU for this easy tasty simple recipe.
Just finished baking this tonight. It’s a little bit on the eggy side for me, so I will follow other comments and use half egg whites beaten until fluffy next time. I didn’t have flax meal so used 1/4 C more coconut flour. It’s really light and has great coconut flavor, which is my preference. My 4-yr old son liked it! I am so happy about that. I topped it with some strawberry preserves and he is enjoying it with a cup of warm milk. I did have a little tunnel of under-doneness on top, but I moved the oven rack to the top and popped it under the broiler for 3 minutes which seemed to solve the problem. Overall – I am surprised that the texture is closer to white bread than I had expected. I am just REALLY happy to have some bread after my first month on Paleo and feel absolutely NOT GUILTY! YAYYY!
If possible, can you create a bread recipe that is keto friendly, and can be made in a bread machine? I have found a successful low carb bread recipe that my husband likes to eat but that includes vital wheat gluten. I have been trying to find a recipe that can be made in a bread machine and that doesn’t require gluten for some time, but I have been unsuccessful. Please create one.

Hello Angie, the same happened here. The taste is great except the bread did not rise. It came out flat. Do I have to slice the load in the middle to get it to rise? I replaced the ghee with regular butter but everything else was the same. Also I read on a different site that if the eggs are not room temperature than that would definitely effect the rise of the bread. I took the cold eggs straight out of the fridge to get the egg whites. What do you think?
I made this last night and it turned out great! I used Bob’s Red Mill almond flour which I know you don’t usually recommend and subbed 1/8 cup chia seed for the flax because that’s what I had on hand and it worked well. We’ve had grilled cheese and peanut butter sandwiches so far. My son is autistic and a very picky eater, and sometimes we have a hard time getting him the protein he needs so this recipe helps a lot. Thanks, Elana!
Hello Angie, the same happened here. The taste is great except the bread did not rise. It came out flat. Do I have to slice the load in the middle to get it to rise? I replaced the ghee with regular butter but everything else was the same. Also I read on a different site that if the eggs are not room temperature than that would definitely effect the rise of the bread. I took the cold eggs straight out of the fridge to get the egg whites. What do you think?
How many eggs did you use when you increased it by 50%? I had a mini loaf pan that was 3 1/2″ by 6″ It came put great but when I got to the center of the loaf I did find a small spot that was still raw dough. Not enough to ruin the loaf though. I used a combination of Bob’s Red Mill almond flour and King Arthur almond flour. Anxious to try it in a full sized loaf pan though if I can figure out how many eggs to use.
Love, love, love! I make a double batch and freeze them with great results. I toast these rolls for all kinds of sandwiches including toasted with bacon, egg, avocado for breakfast. Recently I started sprinkling Trader Joe’s Everything but the Bagel Sesame Seasoning Blend on the tops before baking. Toasted with butter is a great substitute for bagels or hard rolls. Thank you Lexi for such a great recipe!
We Want to Live: The Primal Diet (2005 Expanded Edition) is a book by Aajonus Vonderplanitz. His basic philosophy is that (a) food is to be eaten in a live, raw condition; and (b) a diet rich in raw fats and raw meats from natural sources is essential to health. However his diet includes massive amounts of raw dairy. From the Planets is a book review by Ralph W. Moss. The Live-Food Mailing List discusses the concepts of this book.
Still, many scientists have expressed concern that we do not yet have enough evidence to make any strong claims about the paleo diet’s health benefits, especially its long-term effects. In fact, in an article in response to the first review, authors Tanis R. Fenton and Carol J. Fenton, from the Cumming School of Medicine in Canada, wrote a letter to the editor in which they expressed their disappointment with the review. (5)
Hi, Elana. Just wanted to let you know that I love this bread recipe. I make it all the time. Not long ago, I had an epic fail because I forgot to let my ingredients come to room temperature. I had quite an issue with tunneling. The bread was unusable for slicing, but I decided to cube it and dry it in the oven so I’d have some gluten-free bread for stuffing. I used it to convert my treasured cornbread stuffing recipe to a gluten-free version, and it turned out great. My recipe will be featured on my blog(www.gardenforestfield.com), with a link to your bread recipe, on Monday, Nov. 18th. Thanks for all you do.
A few days ago I was delighted to learn that Dr. Oz was going to again feature The Paleo Diet on his nationally syndicated television show along with one of my co-authors, Nell Stephenson, of The Paleo Diet Cookbook. I tuned into the Dr. Oz show and was happy about most of what I saw except for Chris Kresser, expounding upon the health virtues of a food group, beans and legumes, that definitely are not Paleo. Please read the following...

I cut the bread into thin slices and it is great toasted. I made a sandwich for my husband with bacon, lettuce and tomato and when I handed it to him he looked at me funny and after he took his first bite he asked me: “where did you buy this bread, can we eat bread now?” lol…. I told him I had made the bread with almond flour instead of wheat and he was thrilled.


Proponents of the Paleo diet follow a nutritional plan based on the eating habits of our ancestors in the Paleolithic period, between 2.5 million and 10,000 years ago. Before agriculture and industry, humans presumably lived as hunter–gatherers: picking berry after berry off of bushes; digging up tumescent tubers; chasing mammals to the point of exhaustion; scavenging meat, fat and organs from animals that larger predators had killed; and eventually learning to fish with lines and hooks and hunt with spears, nets, bows and arrows.
Nutrition & Physical Degeneration by Dr. Weston Price's book puts to rest a lot of myths about diet, dental, physical, and emotional health, and presents the strongest case for a super-nutritious Native (or Paleo) Diet. His book outlines the conditions/causes for exceptional health. A classic that was first published in 1938. The Soil and Health Library has a Book Review by Steve Solomon. If you don't buy the book at least read the review. N.B. If you live in one of the countries where this book is now in the public domain, you can read it online. But not if you live in a country where it is still under copyright protection.
Thank you so much for this recipe! I’ve made it several times and I love it for myself. I have tried many versions: coconut oil, ghee, butter, coconut cream, refrigerated coconut milk from a can, shaken (after a couple of days in the fridge) and full fat yogurt. I always beat my eggs for 2-3 minutes (by hand) until very frothy before adding the wet ingredients then beat them again after incorporating wet ingredients to get them thick. Although I like them all, I have had the best results for rising (and actual ‘bread-like’ texture and loft) from coconut oil and yogurt. My husband eats gluten-free but not paleo so when his favourite GF bread was out at the store he was stuck (he’s a ‘must eat sandwich for lunch’ guy and we’ve tried all the GF varieties in our store, some of them complete rocks!). I offered to make him a loaf and he accepted (he’s had this loaf before but felt it’s texture was more like a banana bread or zucchini bread than sandwich material). I got rave reviews from him today about the bread for his sandwich (made with coconut oil and yogurt). Total convert!!
I’ve been following your blog for a long time, I eat since seven years organic and gluten free (brown rice, millet, buckwheat). I have fibromyalgia and have no sugar, cereals and milk. For a year, I do still suffer from a fungus in my gut, so I want to try the paleo diet, so no more grain! I have some of your recepies tried and what are they delicious, never thought that the bread would be so nice! Even better than brown rice and buckwheat! My English is not so good, but wanted to let you know that I love your recipes and I occasionally make a link on my blog for you!
Closely examining one group of modern hunter–gatherers—the Hiwi—reveals how much variation exists within the diet of a single small foraging society and deflates the notion that hunter–gatherers have impeccable health. Such examination also makes obvious the immense gap between a genuine community of foragers and Paleo dieters living in modern cities, selectively shopping at farmers' markets and making sure the dressing on their house salad is gluten, sugar and dairy free.

I cant have flax seed, they trigger severe migraines. When i google replacing flax seeds or any thing else they say you need to know why they are added to the recipe for flavor and nutrition or as binders. In your recipes can you add some sort of code B for binding and F for flavor then its much easier to go about making substitutions. In this recipe is the flax for binding or flavor ? If its for binding can i add more eggs and how many ?

This way of eating has made me feel better in so many ways. I just had such a craving For the texture of cake or bread last night that I had a piece of cake and a sandwich wrap! I knew I had to find a way to satisfy that craving and considered eating a sandwich once a week. Now I can do it without too many carbs. Thanks for taking the time to make it come out right. No more carb BINGES for me.

Obesity, heart disease, and diabetes: These are just a few of the health conditions that proponents of thePaleolithic diet, or caveman diet, blame on our sedentary lifestyles and modern diets, which are loaded with sugar, fat, and processed foods. Their proposed solution? Cut modern foods from our diet and return to the way our early hunter-gatherer ancestors ate.
The Paleolithic or “Paleo” diet seeks to address 21st century ills by revisiting the way humans ate during the Paleolithic era more than 2 million years ago. Paleo proponents state that because our genetics and anatomy have changed very little since the Stone Age, we should eat foods available during that time to promote good health. Our predecessors used simple stone tools that were not advanced enough to grow and cultivate plants, so they hunted, fished, and gathered wild plants for food. If they lived long enough, they were believed to experience less modern-day diseases like diabetes, cancer, and heart disease because of a consistent diet of lean meats and plant foods along with a high level of physical activity from intensive hunting. However, the life expectancy of our predecessors was only a fraction of that of people today.

I made this as written using the pan that Elana linked to and was a little disappointed with the height. A friend of mine said she makes the gluten free bread with a 4″x4″ pyrex pan because it gets taller and better for sandwiches, so i tried the Paleo bread again using her idea. It got taller, but the top looks like a volcano erupted. I’m not quite sure how to get a smoother top or what i did wrong for this to happen.
By far my favorite bread recipe! It turned out golden brown with a great flavor! Super easy and basic ingredients so you don’t have to run to the supermarket before making it. I asked my husband (not paleo or gluten free) to taste it and he thought it was good. That’s quite a compliment because he dislikes most gluten free/paleo things. Just a note, I’m at 9300 feet above sea level and it still raised and turned out delicious!
My bread didn’t turn out well at all. I don’t use dairy, so I couldn’t use the yogurt and that might be it. I also has some issues with my coconut cream taking it’s good ole’ time melting and blending, so my “wet” mixture sat longer than it should have and that might have caused some issues. I will try again, but the flavor and consistency reminded me more of a banana bread than a sandwich bread. So far, not a fan. Hope I can make a go of it next time.
That is EXACTLY what I just started reading through the comments to find out! I’m not that successful a baker anyway, and we’ve lived in CO for the last three years and the altitude has killed all but the easiest recipes for me. And now I’ve been diagnosed with a condition requiring gluten-, dairy-, sugar-, and soy-free. I’m looking forward to trying this recipe!
I just used a 9 x 5 pan and did not change the recipe proportions at all. Since this is the only loaf pan I have, instead, I pushed the dough against one side of the pan and formed a small loaf that is closer to the 7.5 x 3.5 pan size that Elana says to use. The dough was sticky enough to hold together fine and did not collapse or spread out during baking. It’s not the most beautiful creation, but it’s proportioned OK and tastes fine. I say – make it work with what you have and you’ll be alright.
Get rid of the temptation – if you’re gonna go at this thing with a full head of steam, remove all the junk food from your house.  It’s going to take a few weeks for your body to adjust to burning fat instead of glucose, and you might want to eat poorly here and there. If there’s no food in your house to tempt you, it will be much easier to stay on target.
Hi Sophie, I have found that the best almond flour for baking are the ones that have the skin removed (blanched) and are very finely ground. Some brands call it almond meal and some almond flour, so there’s no standard name currently. I have also found that not all brand work well. For example the Bobs Red Mill brand fails most of the time for baking. My personal favorite brands are by Honeyville and welbees. You may be able to order these from amazon.
This is a complete list of foods not allowed on the paleo diet. It’s a sad day when you first have to say goodbye to these foods but, once you start, it’s much easier and you find there are even better paleo substitutes for these foods. The first few weeks might be tough, but if you stick with it over time, it’ll be worth it. We promise. Here’s the ultimate list of foods not allowed on the paleo diet.

By far my favorite bread recipe! It turned out golden brown with a great flavor! Super easy and basic ingredients so you don’t have to run to the supermarket before making it. I asked my husband (not paleo or gluten free) to taste it and he thought it was good. That’s quite a compliment because he dislikes most gluten free/paleo things. Just a note, I’m at 9300 feet above sea level and it still raised and turned out delicious!

This cornbread is cooked up southern style, but because it’s using ingredients that are Paleo friendly it clocks in as a low-carb food. Isn’t it nice to not have to worry about carbs, calories, fat grams, points, or any other silly thing they have you counting on other diet programs. With Paleo your focus is on using pure, wholesome, natural ingredients and eating until you feel satisfied. It’s about taking a philosophy towards food that is more in line with our body’s natural state of being, before we went and mucked things up with agriculture. This cornbread goes great with a bowl of Paleo chili.

While I haven’t made this recipe, I’ve used flaxmeal in a lot of muffin recipes, and on a occasion I’ve noticed those same gossamer-type strings after a few days. My best guess is it has something to do with flax, although I’m not sure what causes them to develop. Some recipes I use flaxmeal in never develop the strings, and some do, but it definitely only happens in breads where I use flaxmeal. I think the food is still safe to eat though! I wish I knew exactly what causes it too…
Thank you for another amazing recipe, Elana! I am thrilled to find delicious recipes that support a healthy lifestyle, and that I can share with family and friends. Your cookbooks are a staple in our house and your blog is a gift to me. I am looking forward to trying some of your great breakfast ideas to start to school year off right. Thanks for sharing the fruit of your efforts. :)
While I haven’t made this recipe, I’ve used flaxmeal in a lot of muffin recipes, and on a occasion I’ve noticed those same gossamer-type strings after a few days. My best guess is it has something to do with flax, although I’m not sure what causes them to develop. Some recipes I use flaxmeal in never develop the strings, and some do, but it definitely only happens in breads where I use flaxmeal. I think the food is still safe to eat though! I wish I knew exactly what causes it too…
Richard Nikoley has the blog Free The Animal. He loves meat eating. His diet is near paleo, with the addition of some gray-area foods that he likes. These days most of his posts are on food. One recent trend in the paleo community is trying to optimize the proportions of the foods eaten. If you've read my definition you'll know that I simply define the diet as foods in and out. One of Richard's posts: Optimality: A Fool's Errand? has produced a long discussion of this trend.
Hi V. Not all my recipes need nuts or almond flour, but most my baked goods do. This is because almond flour gives the best texture. If your son is allergic to nuts I would suggest substituting the nuts for seeds, and the almond flour for pumpkin or sunflower seed flour. You can also try using a gluten-free oats flours. I haven’t made this substitution in many of my recipes, but it’s worth a try. Please let me know how it goes.
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