Hi, Kaylie. It’s yummy! I just made the bread and ate 4(!) slices before slicing and freezing the rest. I followed the recipe exactly, using the same ingredients, measurements, temp. and baking time. I was surprised by the size of the finished loaf. It measured 3 7/8″ wide by 2″ high. I can’t imagine making a sandwich with slices that size! That said, it tastes great, and has a very good texture. At 35 minutes, I used a toothpick to see if it was baked through. The toothpick came out clean, but on slicing it, I think I’ll give it a few more minutes when I make it again. Thanks for the recipe.

These researchers point out that there are plenty of reasons to suggest that the low-fat-is-good-health hypothesis has now effectively failed the test of time. In particular, that we are in the midst of an obesity epidemic that started around the early 1980’s, and that this was coincident with the rise of the low-fat dogma. (Type 2 diabetes, the most common form of the disease, also rose significantly through this period.)
Hi Kerstin, Sorry you had issues whipping the whites. It can sometimes be more difficult with the kind from a carton. The cream of tartar helps, but sometimes isn’t enough. Did you wait for the whites to be at room temp before beginning? This can help with whipping. Unfortunately the bread won’t turn out very well without getting the whites to stiff peaks. I hope it works for you next time, and if the cartons don’t work for you, you can try with the whites from whole eggs. You can use the yolks to make hollandaise sauce or creme brulee like this.
We’ve been on the Keto journey since the end of February last year and this is my favourite bread recipe so far, I just made a loaf and it turned out great. I don’t have a food processor so I did use my blender and for ingredients I only used the almond flour, coconut flour, baking powder, butter, salt, 8 egg whites (all I had left in the fridge) and the only optional ingredient I added was stevia. The texture was still really nice without the extra ingredients which is a nice option and this tasted like a regular loaf of bread, I’ll definitely be making this again!!
Well… it turned out beautifully. It rose evenly, it was light, fluffy and baked through. It tasted very good, both plain and toasted with butter. I truthfully do not know if I would add the butter the next time I make a loaf because I was so pleased with this version. I will likely reduce the erythritol to 1 tablespoon or less for a more subtle sweetness in the future. This recipe has so many flavour possibilities and I look forward to trying out all of my ideas using this excellent base. It is also good to know that it can be made without the additional fat component. Don’t get me wrong, I am keto and a committed high fat enthusiast but slathering some fat on top of the bread… butter, pâté, nut butter… will work just fine for me.
Made this yesterday and it looked/tasted beautiful! Did not do anything special (whipping the white, creaming the butter, etc) .. just folded gently and it was just a beautiful golden color. I topped it with sesame seeds because the flax seeds had already been put away. I put the dough into two mini-loaf pans and they fit perfectly. Perfect way to get my bread cravings with gest. diabetes and got two thumbs up from my diabetic dad, too, who eventually stole my other loaf! Will be making again and again. Thank you!

I’ve been experimenting with your low carb corn bread recipe this week, not necessarily trying to emulate cornbread specifically but just to make a keto-friendly bread-like food, and that recipe was the first candidate I found browsing your site. I started off with a half recipe (fudging the fractional egg) because I only had around 2 tbsp of flaxmeal (brown, not golden) on hand. I quite enjoyed it, so I bought more flaxmeal and tried the recipe substituting hazelnut flour for almond, and again brown flaxmeal for golden and it was delicious (I gotta lay off! I can’t stop eating it, as I basically haven’t had bread in 3 years!) (brief note: I needed to bake quite a bit longer than you instructed both times.)


I made dressing/stuffing out of this bread! I cut the bread into slices, then cut the slices into cubes. I put them on a metal pan and into my toaster oven on low temperature and let them crisp up. It takes a good while, but they DO get crisp! Then I have my croutons for the dressing. The dressing I made was delicious. I think the next time I make the bread to use for croutons I’m going to add onion powder and sage to the mixture before baking so the croutons will be seasoned some before I begin making the dressing! Love this bread! It is the most like wheat flour bread that I have tried! Thanks Maya!
I’m not a believer in vegan or Paleo diets. I believe in a healthy diet that leans somewhat in the vegetarian direction and I just became convinced of the need to eliminate wheat from my diet. I applaud this website and the author for providing me with the bread alternatives I was looking for. I also appreciated the open eclectic attitude of the author in including some items recommended by vegans. Still, I believe red meat should be avoided . Thank You.
Advocates of the diet argue that the increase in diseases of affluence after the dawn of agriculture was caused by changes in diet, but others have countered that it may be that pre-agricultural hunter-gatherers did not suffer from the diseases of affluence because they did not live long enough to develop them.[30] Based on the data from hunter-gatherer populations still in existence, it is estimated that at age 15, life expectancy was an additional 39 years, for a total age of 54.[31] At age 45, it is estimated that average life expectancy was an additional 19 years, for a total age of 64 years.[32][33] That is to say, in such societies, most deaths occurred in childhood or young adulthood; thus, the population of elderly – and the prevalence of diseases of affluence – was much reduced. Excessive food energy intake relative to energy expended, rather than the consumption of specific foods, is more likely to underlie the diseases of affluence. "The health concerns of the industrial world, where calorie-packed foods are readily available, stem not from deviations from a specific diet but from an imbalance between the energy humans consume and the energy humans spend."[34]
I love this recipe, I just tweaked a couple of things to get it how I wanted it. I replaced 1/2 cup of almond flour with an extra 1/2 cup of tapioca starch. I also separated out all but one of the egg whites, and beat them to a soft peak. After mixing the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients, I folded the egg whites in. This helped give it a boost to make it a bit taller and fluffier. The final product was springy and tasty, and better than most gluten free breads I’ve purchased.
Excluding foods. The exclusion of entire categories of commonly eaten foods like whole grains and dairy requires frequent label reading in the supermarket and in restaurants. It may also increase the risk of deficiencies such as calcium, vitamin D, and B vitamins, if these nutrients are not consistently eaten from the allowed foods or a vitamin supplement. For example, there are some nondairy calcium-rich foods that are absorbed well by the body such as collard and turnip greens or canned bone-in sardines and salmon, but you would have to eat five or more servings of these greens and fish bones daily to meet recommended calcium needs. (Note that some greens like spinach that are touted to be calcium-rich also contain oxalates and phytates that bind to calcium so very little is actually absorbed.) One small, short-term intervention study of healthy participants showed a 53% decrease from baseline in calcium intake after following a Paleo diet for three weeks. [8] Furthermore, the exclusion of whole grains can result in reduced consumption of beneficial nutrients such as fiber and thus may increase one’s risk for diabetes and heart disease.
There is little argument over the health benefits of fruits and vegetables. They are chock-full of vitamins, minerals, fiber and antioxidants. The only caveat for paleo dieters is that some vegetables are starchy (e.g., potatoes) and some fruits are higher in sugar (e.g., bananas). So, if you are trying to lose weight or watch your blood sugar levels, eat these in moderation. In fact, potatoes are banned from some versions of the diet.
I made this for the first time today. I’m guessing here, but you may have mixed it too well, meaning the gas produced by the baking soda/yogurt/vinegar mixture was spent by the time you got it into the pan. No reaction means no gas, no gas means no lift. (I gently folded mine together and the rise brought it up above the top of the pan, just in the middle, but still.)
As a follow up to my post a few days ago about the ammonia smell after I slice the bread…..someone mentioned it could be the flax. So I baked a loaf and substituted chia for the flax, and still got the ammonia smell. I am wondering if there is some kind of chemical reaction taking place? And if so, I would assume this is not safe to eat? Is it the baking soda? Or apple cider vinegar? I don’t want to keep using up all my almond flour (I use Trader Joe’s), so if someone has any insight I would love to hear. Thanks
Joel Runyon is the founder of Ultimate Paleo Guide and CEO of Paleo Meal Plans. He's a precision nutrition, and Gym Jones Level 1 certified, and helped millions of people get healthy and lose weight since 2012. Joel is also an ultra runner and endurance athlete - and in 2017, he became the the youngest person to run an ultra marathon on every continent in the world to build 7 schools with Pencils of Promise in developing countries.Follow him on Twitter, Instagram, Athlinks and read his full bio here.
If you’ve ever considered (or tried) the Paleo diet, your first thought was probably, “ugh, another one with no bread?!” We feel you, it’s a tough moment when you hear your beloved carbs must go. ICYMI, the Paleo diet cuts out grains and legumes in favor of a protein- and veggie-rich diet. Sure, Wonder Bread wasn’t part of a caveman’s diet, but that doesn’t mean modern-day humans haven’t found a way around the rules.
The Paleo diet is based upon everyday, modern foods that mimic the food groups of our pre-agricultural, hunter-gatherer ancestors. Though there are numerous benefits eating a hunter-gatherer diet, there are seven fundamental characteristics of hunter-gatherer diets that help to optimize your health, minimize your risk of chronic disease, and to lose weight and keep it off.
Cordain admits that meat leads to plaque and increases cholesterol where plants wouldn’t. And science establishes that plaque and cholesterol lead to heart attacks and strokes. But Cordain argues that plaque alone is insufficient to cause harm. Rather, it is plaque combined with inflammation that causes heart attacks and strokes. So avoid acid, salt, legumes, wheat, starchy vegetables, dairy, oil, fatty meats, and grains because they cause inflammation. But if both science and Cordain agree that plaque is a necessary part of the heart-disease equation—and that meat causes plaque—why should we follow Paleo rather than just forgo meat?
We cannot time travel and join our Paleo ancestors by the campfire as they prepare to eat; likewise, shards of ancient pottery and fossilized teeth can tell us only so much. If we compare the diets of so-called modern hunter-gatherers, however, we see just how difficult it is to find meaningful commonalities and extract useful dietary guidelines from their disparate lives (see infographic). Which hunter–gatherer tribe are we supposed to mimic, exactly? How do we reconcile the Inuit diet—mostly the flesh of sea mammals—with the more varied plant and land animal diet of the Hadza or !Kung? Chucking the many different hunter–gather diets into a blender to come up with some kind of quintessential smoothie is a little ridiculous. "Too often modern health problems are portrayed as the result of eating 'bad' foods that are departures from the natural human diet…This is a fundamentally flawed approach to assessing human nutritional needs," Leonard wrote. "Our species was not designed to subsist on a single, optimal diet. What is remarkable about human beings is the extraordinary variety of what we eat. We have been able to thrive in almost every ecosystem on the Earth, consuming diets ranging from almost all animal foods among populations of the Arctic to primarily tubers and cereal grains among populations in the high Andes.”
I have successfully made the Paleo bread twice & it worked out perfectly! However, when I made it recently, the edges of the bread were a gray color upon taking it out of the pan. When I sliced the bread & spread with raspberry jam (to resemble a tea cake), the jam turned blue-gray. I think it was some sort of acidic reaction. I did leave the bread in the pan for about 40 minutes after baking before releasing. Now I just remembered that I used rice vinegar (because I was out of cider). Maybe that caused the reaction? I used anodized aluminum pan by the brand “Fat Daddy.”
The China Study is frequently cited when criticizing the Paleo Diet – focusing on a vegetarian diet and consuming rice is healthier than the Paleo Diet. I respectfully disagree with that nutritional philosophy and strongly disagree with the conclusions drawn from that book [7], and will leave you to make your own conclusions based on your own self-experimentation.

Wowwwww!!! This is amazing. I had to change the recipe a bit (I followed the top recipe) because of lack of ingredients. I used Raw Almond Flour (not blanched); I used only three eggs + one chia egg + one flax egg; and my pan was about 8.5*4, so a bit bigger than recommended; I did not use the food processor, just mixed everything with a whisk and a spoon. Even though the pan was larger the height was great, and I’ve never had such a moist bread. Incredible! It is so delicious and wonderful. And so easy to make!! Thank you so much- I haven’t eaten anything like this since quitting gluten. This will be my go-to bread from now on.
Eat WELL Feel GOOD: Practical Paleo Living by Diane Frampton has over 200 recipes that makes paleo eating simple, delicious, and ultimately, intuitive. So they claim. There are only a few reviews at Amazon. They all like the book, but their lack of details makes it appear that they are not truly independent reviews. The recipes have a Crossfit appeal to them. Chef Rachel Albert has made some of the recipes and posted here [archive.org].
An Interview with Ward Nicholson now has three parts on the web. Good overview of man's diet over the past 65 million years. Long but highly recommended reading. First published in Chet Day's "Health & Beyond" newsletter. Now part of a very comprehensive Beyond Vegetarianism site. Every argument that your vegetarian friends use to avoid meat for health reasons is debunked here.
Bailey, We’re so happy to hear you enjoyed this recipe! Regarding having bread fall, did you cook it for the full amount of time the recipe calls for, and did you cover the top with foil for the last 15 minutes? If so, there might be an issue with your oven’s calibration (you can get an inexpensive oven thermometer to check this). Another tip is to let your eggs come to room temperature first. Another factor is the altitude at which you’re baking; if you’re at high altitude, you might need to slightly adjust the oven temperature and bake time. The other thing to remember is that there will usually be a little bit of fall to most keto breads (in fact, every keto bread we’ve ever made) because keto flours lack gluten and are naturally quite dense; however, you can see in the photos, we still got a good rise on this loaf. I hope these tips help!
This is the best gluten free bread recipe I’ve tried! So glad I found this. It’s not crumbly, very bread-like, just a bit dense. I loosely followed the recipe and changed a few things. I omitted the maple syrup to make it whole30. I didn’t have arrowroot so I subbed tapioca starch per some of the comments and added some chia seeds as well. Since there was so much coconut oil in it, I plan on experimenting and using olive oil so it doesn’t have too much of a coconut taste. My husband didn’t really notice it though. He is the gluten free one and he’s very picky about his bread, but this got his approval! I added some almonds on top and garlic and Italian herb seasoning to give it a flavor boost. I had trouble with this in the blender, maybe because I don’t have a very good one, so I will just use a mixing bowl next time. Thank you for sharing! I will be telling my friends about this!

Made this bread the other night and it is so wonderful!!.Love it slightly warmed with a pat of butter.My only problem is that it did not rise that much so can’t really use for a sandwich.My eggs were not fresh nor my refrigerated flaxseed meal..I used a glass loaf pan (buttered).I did cook at 350 degrees for the 30 min and it came out wonderful!!Thanks so much for the recipe.I love the recipes with honey and/or stevia, sucanat or rapadura.
My 16 month old son loves the bread. He prefers it over the bakery italian bread(full of gluten and yeast) that we normally get him. Plus our dog is allergic to grains, so now I don’t have to worry about our son sharing his bread with her. As for me, I’m allergic to yeast and I’ve wanted to reduce gluten in my diet. Finding gluten and yeast free bread is nearly impossible.
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