I wish I had taken a photo because this bread is gorgeous! My husband (who is anti-healthy food) said “I see bread like that and I want to eat it…but since you told me it was made with almonds I won’t, out of spite”…and then 10 minutes later…”that would taste really good toasted with butter” (and a big chunk was missing from the loaf). So easy to make with ingredients I always have on hand. Bravo! I will be making this weekly!
Hi Laura, can your husband have cashews? You could try making it with cashew flour. Also, some people like substituting almond flour for pumpkin seed flour, or a gluten free oat flour. These may also work, but will give the bread a unique taste and texture. Happy to hear you’re not giving up and you want to try making another bread recipe 🙂 Please let me know how it goes.
A great question to ask is “Does the Paleo diet work?” Here we have a head to head comparison between the Paleo diet and Mediterranean diet in insulin resistant Type 2 Diabetics. The results? The Paleo diet group REVERSED the signs and symptoms of insulin resistant, Type 2 diabetes. The Mediterranean diet showed little if any improvements. It is worth noting that the Mediterranean diet is generally held up by our government as “the diet to emulate” despite better alternatives. You can find an abstract and the complete paper here.

Cordain argues that chimpanzees and horses avoid meat, and they have big bellies that we would have if we didn’t ditch plants for meat. He also says meat increased human brain size, and decreased stomach size so we can have the six-pack abs that chimps can’t. But I looked at his endnotes with citations to research and couldn’t find the source for these theories. I also couldn’t find research showing that legumes and grains were invented by humans.
Cordain admits that meat leads to plaque and increases cholesterol where plants wouldn’t. And science establishes that plaque and cholesterol lead to heart attacks and strokes. But Cordain argues that plaque alone is insufficient to cause harm. Rather, it is plaque combined with inflammation that causes heart attacks and strokes. So avoid acid, salt, legumes, wheat, starchy vegetables, dairy, oil, fatty meats, and grains because they cause inflammation. But if both science and Cordain agree that plaque is a necessary part of the heart-disease equation—and that meat causes plaque—why should we follow Paleo rather than just forgo meat?
Gah, do you feel like I say that enough? Haha. But really, the way our bodies respond to certain foods and digestion is so individualized. I think it’ definitely depends on our gut flora, hormones, environment we are living, etc. Which is why I like to make gluten free allergy friendly recipes. Some people need grain free, nut free, others feel better on an egg free or vegan diet, and some are just starting off eating a gluten free diet and are overwhelmed.
I doubled the recipe and baked in a glass loaf pan (standard U.S. size) at 350 degrees for 40 minutes. The texture was great, but the taste was not so great…like baking soda (soapy/salty/bitter). I finally figured out that the baking soda didn’t have enough acid to react with, because I make my own raw applesauce in the Vitamix. Many prepared applesauce brands have citric acid added. I will try making this again tomorrow with the addition of a teaspoon or two of lemon juice. Hopefully that will be enough to react with the baking soda and remove the awful aftertaste. My husband didn’t care at all. He made two ham sandwiches with four slices of the bread, and then ate two more slices with jam. Half the loaf is gone already!

I’ve lived with food intolerances for about 30 years so I’m happy experimenting with all sorts of different ingredients. However, I’ve recently realised I have a problem with gluten and whilst I can make breads such as this one successfully I’ve never found a substitute that gives me the elasticity of gluten (I am unable to eat gluten free flour and having found out the ingredient that gives it the elasticity I no longer want to eat it). Have you ever found a flour or a combination of ingredients that gives the elasticity to make something like pitta bread? May I say that I wish I’d had access to your blog, ideas and cook books 30 years ago, they’re fantastic and my life would have been so much easier. Thank you for making the time to both experiment and share your ideas with others.
Thanks Kaylie. I used the ingredients I had at hand so that is why I did what I did. Can I eliminate the maple syrup without loosing something? Don’t like the sweet taste. I will try the other recipe first and let you know how I make out. Thanks for getting back to me. We need everyone’s expertise. Glad you like my adventurous spirit….making mistakes is just so much fun!!! :^)

Buried in the middle of The Revised Metabolic Oncolytic Regimen for Effecting Lysis in Solid Tumors one can find their diet recommendations for tumor control. It has a paleo diet orientation. Protein is 35%, preferably Omega 3 rich. Carbohydrates (also 35%) are only vegetables and fruit, no beans, bread, potatoes, or any grain. Then dietary and supplemental forms of fat should provide 20-30% of (daily) calories.

Cheryl, We use beef gelatin in this recipe to act as a binder and add a bit more chewiness to help simulate regular bread. (If you’re interested, we talk more about using beef gelatin in keto baking in this post: https://theketoqueens.com/crispy-low-carb-indian-flatbread-recipe/.) We haven’t experimented with this recipe to omit the beef gelatin, but you might be able to get a similar result using a bit more psyllium husk powder, flaxseed meal, ground chia seeds, xanthan gum, or guar gum. If you decide to play around with the recipe, please let us know how it goes!
×