Hi Maya, I’m new to your website and I’m anxious to try out this bread recipe. I’m helping my 27 year old son lose some weight. He’s on some pretty potent medication that has caused him to crave carbs thus putting on quite a bit of weight over the past few years. Since I’m his caregiver and also a Certified Nutritionist, I’m looking for some healthy alternatives to make his transition a bit easier and he loves bread.
No, I am not confused. There are many people that follow the paleo diet and also consume dairy products for their high fat and nutrient content. It is listed as an ingredient in a lot of paleo cookbooks and a lot of the big names in the paleo community not only consume dairy, but have also written several articles describing its benefits. I listed dairy free ingredients in the recipe for people that are lactose intolerant.

I ran out of coconut oil last week and my replacement doesn’t arrive until tomorrow. Desperate to try this I used canolia oil instead. I acknowledge that it’s properties are very different than coconut oil. That said, the bread is fantastic, a bit oily (but I bet that is the fault of my decision), and the taste is really eggy almost like french toast. I also lack a food processor so I mixed it all by hand after sifting the flours together.

There has been so much nutrition and dietary mis-information in the past 100 years, it’s very confusing to sort it all out. I’m thankful I found Paleo! And as paleo shoppers, we know to avoid the center of the market and stick to the outside loop which is where we find the lean proteins, the nuts, seeds, greens, vegetables and fruits. It not only saves us time when we shop, it keeps us healthy.
I omitted the flax meal (because it’s not an ingredient I keep on hand) as well as the honey (because I am on a sweetener-free/fruit-free program right now to try to break my addiction to sugar), and it turned out a bit salty-tasting, but otherwise, great! Next time I will play around with decreasing the salt/baking soda or add vanilla to help with the salty taste.
Hi Sally, thanks for your comment and kind words. I mostly bake with almond flour and coconut flour because they are much lower carb than other gluten-free flours. Unfortunately, I don’t think they are elastic enough to make pita bread. When we have falafel and other foods that are typically served with some type of bread product, I serve in a lettuce wrap which takes next to no time to prepare, is low carb, and very healthy. Sorry I can’t be of more help!
Hi Elana, first let me say this bread is DELICIOUS! It turned out sweet, very moist, and just wonderful. HOWEVER, I am new to gluten free baking and despite the deliciousness of the bread, I ended up with a very faint ammonia-ish smell/after-taste and for the life of me I cannot figure out why. The only difference in the way I made my bread from your recipe is that I used whole, raw almond meal and whole, raw flaxseed meal, because that is what I had on hand. Oh and i used pure maple syrup instead of honey.
Hi Tessa, almond flour is actually very moist and doesn’t soak up much moisture. It can make baked goods oily and super moist sometimes. There are many brands that sell almond flour now, but not all work well or give you the same result when baking. The brands I found work best for baking are by Honeyville and Welbee’s. I also always use the blanched flour in my recipes. What brand did you use? I am happy you like my recipe. Please let me know how it goes when you try making it again and post a photo here so I can see.
Protein is a staple of the caveman diet- specifically options that are grass-fed, wild caught or organic, as these options are often from animals raised in environments that encourage natural behavior. And because our ancestors didn't just live off chicken and beef, they hunted a wide variety of meat, the more variety you can add to your proteins, the better!
It took a month or so, but I finally decided to start playing around with adding a few other paleo-friendly starches, like arrowroot and tapioca. That’s what it took for me to come up with what I consider to be the perfect loaf. I had been holding out on adding other starches because I wanted to keep my ingredient list minimal, but really, these additions make all the difference in the end result of this bread.
Hi Tessa, it’s hard to say what went wrong if you said you used all of the exact same ingredients as I do, and you follow the directions. The only thing I can think of is how you’re measuring your ingredients. Adding more yogurt or milk will not help and may make your bread very soggy. Let me know what happens when you try again. I will make a video showing the process soon.

Hi Kim, thank you for your feedback. I think it’s interesting that the recipe turned out well using coconut flour instead. I would love it if you could post a photo of your bread here in the comments so I can see it. Substituting coconut flour for almond flour is tricky, and I think it worked out for you because you cut the amount of flour added in half.

If you’ve been laying off the magic 7 layer magic cookie bars this holiday season because of their layers of processed sugars and fats, I have some good news for you.  We can make these magical bars of goodness PALEO, VEGAN and CLEAN so you can treat yourself and still maintain your healthy eating goals!  How do we do it? To make my 7 layer bar recipe…
You don’t often equate coconuts as being savory, but there are a few things in play here that get this to work. The use of coconut flour replaces the typical wheat-based flour used in most store bought bread. The savory comes from a combination of flax meal, sea salt, and olive oil. Coconut flour provides the right texture and helps this taste like a bread, and is one of the more popular flours used in Paleo baking because it has more of a light and airy taste and feel to it. Since it is derived from coconuts no grains are harmed in the process.
The Lazy Paleo Enthusiast's Cookbook: A Collection of Practical Recipes and Advice on How to Eat Healthy, Tasty Food While Spending as Little Time in the Kitchen as Possible by Sean Robertson. The author is a recovering vegan and in the first half of the book recounts his dietary experiences using some paleo foods to restore his health. You learn that the author's main strategy is to make food in large batches which can be reheated to provide dinners for several days running. The second half of the book contains 28 recipes. Some borderline or nonpaleo ingredients do appear, but most of the recipes are more paleo than not. Published November 15, 2011.
There were some recipes I tried that were decent enough and definitely passable as bread-like concoctions, but nothing was stellar. Or even good enough to warrant making a second time (IMHO). And there were also a few loaves that were actually pretty bad in different ways – either the flavor and/or the texture was just off – that ended up only being fit for the garbage (definitely a sad thing). But that’s how we learn, right?
I just made the bread above and sadly for me LOLOl it was only 2′ high I am wondering if that is because i mixed it in my Mixmaster not a food processor it tastes yummy but I’m not sure why it didn’t rise higher. the batter was very thick when I put it in the loaf tin Oh well I wil have to try it again LOLOl we will eat it fast as it tastes soooo good
In making the case for meat, Cordain presents anecdotal evidence of Eskimos who lived their full life without a heart attack. The Eskimo diet consists of 97% meat, which he concedes causes all Eskimos to develop atherosclerosis—a common precursor to heart disease. But Cordain says Eskimos never die of heart disease. He discusses one Eskimo who lived 45 years and another who lived 53 years, both without heart disease! He then jumps to the conclusion that because these Eskimos didn’t get heart attacks, even with severe atherosclerosis, meat must have protected them from heart disease. So Cordain’s best case for lots of meat is that you can live to the ripe age of 45 or even 53 without a heart attack. But do people—even unhealthy smokers or the obese—generally get heart attacks before age 53?
How many eggs did you use when you increased it by 50%? I had a mini loaf pan that was 3 1/2″ by 6″ It came put great but when I got to the center of the loaf I did find a small spot that was still raw dough. Not enough to ruin the loaf though. I used a combination of Bob’s Red Mill almond flour and King Arthur almond flour. Anxious to try it in a full sized loaf pan though if I can figure out how many eggs to use.
Hi Keith, hope I can help a little. Coconut flour is very dry and absorbs a LOT of moisture so it is most difficult to replace in recipes. I have had success increasing other flours and/or reducing liquid. Coconut oil can be replaced with ghee or olive oil, but the taste will change a bit. I use date sugar or honey (again, adjust liquid) in some recipes. It might just be easier for you to do a web search for coconut-free recipes!

This looks awesome! Just wanted to say thank you. I’m a bomber cook, but when it comes to baking, I’m so grateful people like you are willing to play around in the kitchen and make all the mistakes for me. :) Also, I made your chocolate cream pie from your cookbook for a party and I swear, no one ever knows your desserts are GF and Primal-friendly. It’s gotten to where I always bring dessert so I know I can enjoy something, but then everyone ends up eating it too!
I was hesitant at first to try to make the bread because I didn’t want to waste the expensive ingredients. Well the bread taste even better. It doesn’t have any eggy flavor. It actually taste better than any paleo bread I’ve ever had. It was a little dense and didn’t rise as much but it was a first try with seed flour. I did have a reaction from the seeds and the baking soda. Green spots lol. My neighbor said it was the best I have ever made. It will need some tweaking. So Adriana if you find a better way to make this rise better please let me know. It was also a little greasy but just a little. I. Trying pumpkin seeds next. Thank you so much for giving us a great bread recipe that is so versitile. if anyone finds a way to improve this please let me know. You will be very happy if you try this with sunflower seed flour. 

Coconut Flour: As Lexi pointed out Coconut Flour is not a 1:1 ratio. Coconut flour absorbs a LOT of liquid, so you have to either combine it with other flours in light quantaties, or use 6 eggs for every 1/2 cup of flour. Yes, I said 6 eggs with every ONE HALF cup of coconut flour. You can also use various liquids. Either way, it needs to have the same consistency as it would if you used the almond flour, it should be thin like pancake. If not it will out very dense.
A diet high in phytic acid, which can be found in whole grains (it's in the bran) and beans like soy, is very detrimental for mineral absorption. Phytic acid strongly binds to minerals like calcium, iron, zinc and magnesium to form insoluble salts, phytates, which precipitate from the body and are not absorbed. Staffan Lindeberg has written a summary on phytic acid.
Tonight, I tried using this differently…I coated all natural hot dogs with it and made “corn dogs”. I was able to cover 7 easily with a full recipe, minus 1 egg so it would be stiffer dough, and laid them on a Silpat covered cookie sheet. I started at 400 degrees to make sure they browned, but I ended up turning it down to 350 for about 25 minutes. They were great. Thanks again for the recipe and hard work.
This is one of the best gluten-free bread recipes I’ve tried. I made mine in a 9 x 5 loaf pan. It’s a little vertically challenged, but it still tastes good and has a nice texture to it. I’m a recovering carb-junkie who realized the one thing I craved most was likely a factor in decades worth of digestive grief. As an experiment, I eliminated wheat products from my diet and my digestive health has shown significant improvement. But I have so missed my morning toast with peanut butter. This bread is a great replacement, one that’s both tasty and nutritious (unlike store bought GF bread). It’s delicious with peanut butter, jam, butter, or just on its own. Thank you for the wonderful recipe!
The Paleo diet has become more and more popular over the years, mimicking our ancient ancestors’ most basic diet of vegetables, meats, fruits, and nuts. The Paleo approach is to stay low in the mainstream processed foods that have filled our grocery store shelves and stick to natural food that’s free of additives. The hardest time to avoid these? Dessert! With these Paleo desserts, you get to avoid the added sugars, get full faster, and typically take in fewer carbohydrates.

Protein is a staple of the caveman diet- specifically options that are grass-fed, wild caught or organic, as these options are often from animals raised in environments that encourage natural behavior. And because our ancestors didn't just live off chicken and beef, they hunted a wide variety of meat, the more variety you can add to your proteins, the better!


I have tried so many paleo breads I can’t even count and I don’t normally post comments but I just made this bread and it is hands down the best paleo bread I have ever had and dare I say one of the best breads in general! Thank you Faith for sharing this incredible recipe! My husband and MY kids even love this bread! I followed your recipe perfectly as I had all the ingredients. I did however use the brown flax meal but I actually prefer it to look brown anyway. I also added some BRAG organic 24 herb and spice blend seasoning before baking and it tasted amazing! I took pictures even! Thanks again for sharing this recipe!
Since doing low carb the one thing I’ve really missed is bread. I used to eat it with almost every meal. My wife has been very negative about paleo bread recipes saying that it would be dry and crumbly. Well, I made some bean soup with ham and finally made your microwave bread. IT WAS FANTASTIC!!!!! I gave my wife a bite and she was amazed. It was moist, soft and delicious. Especially good knowing that it’s good for me, with no gluten or any other killers. Thank you so much for this recipe.
Once your yeast is proofed, add in the egg, egg whites, lightly cooled melted butter (you don't want to scramble the eggs or kill the yeast!) and vinegar. Mix with an electric mixer for a couple minutes until light and frothy. Add the flour mixture in two batches, alternating with the sour cream, and mixing until thoroughly incorporated. You want to mix thoroughly and quickly to activate the xanthan gum, though the dough will become thick as the flours absorb the moisture. 
Oh my GOSH!! It’s REAL bread! My poor little guys (okay, and me too) have really been struggling since going gluten free for the third time (this time we went Paleo and it has finally resolved their symptoms and as a side note resolved mine, though I didn’t realize in the beginning I had a gluten problem). My son and I are oohing and ahhing in my kitchen right now over this bread. I’d given up on the difficult task of making gluten free bread when the first several complicated recipes I tried were gross and gritty. I did not have high hopes for yet another bread recipe, nevertheless one that would fit into our Paleo diet, but this is seriously amazing and it was fast and easy to make in my Vitamix. Moist and delicious, we decided we had to make some quick strawberry jam to celebrate this delicious occasion. Thank you, thank you for giving my boys (and me!!) our bread back!!! 

Love, love, love! I make a double batch and freeze them with great results. I toast these rolls for all kinds of sandwiches including toasted with bacon, egg, avocado for breakfast. Recently I started sprinkling Trader Joe’s Everything but the Bagel Sesame Seasoning Blend on the tops before baking. Toasted with butter is a great substitute for bagels or hard rolls. Thank you Lexi for such a great recipe!

Thanks for reading this post. Of these recipes, pick one that sounds good to, and try it. These are all good recipes and fairly easy to make, I like to make the Cheesy Tapioca Flatbread, as its pretty quick and tastes great. I’ve got lots of paleo resources and recipes on here, so click around to find out more about paleo. Keep me posted on how things go and always feel free to share a story or ask a question.
This bread is, hands down, THE best GF/paleo bread I have ever had or made in my life. It is so simple, so easy, so perfect, and so delicious that I haven’t been able to stop staring at it, mouth agape. (Quite convenient since that makes it easier for me to continuously eat it.) With Kerry butter it is simply divine. I will never want for another quick/soda bread recipe ever again.
I tried this recipe today and I’m blown away. I haven’t started Keto yet but I am soon. I’ve been trying recipes out, and I truly didn’t expect this to come out right the first time because I’ve never whipped egg whites or folded them into anything. I’m a terrible baker. It was so easy! Even my toddler and husband loves this! I didn’t use the sweetener and love the way it tastes!
I found this recipe after buying Paleo Bread at Wholefoods. It was SO bad that it drove me to find a good recipe to make my own. When I read the review that it wasn’t too eggy, I was sold. I am not a huge fan of eggs (too bad for someone attempting a primal diet) so I was set to try this. I followed the directions exactly…even taking extra time to beat the eggs. I used the yoghurt instead of coconut cream. It came out perfect. Thank you for making something edible and still Paleo. I tried to give this recipe 5 stars but it’s having a glitch and won’t let me. 5 stars!!!
A more controversial argument for why legumes and common grains are avoided is because of their high phytic acid content, which is thought to reduce the absorption of certain nutrients like iron zinc and calcium (6). However, phytic acid is also found in many paleo approved foods (like almonds and hazelnuts), and is associated with some health benefits - like protective benefits against kidney stones, antioxidant properties and a suggested link to lower risk for colon cancer (7,8,9). Bottom line, there really isn't any evidenced based reason to avoid these foods because of phytic acid. 
I’m new to the paleo lifestyle, if I’m honest I’m new to healthy non fast food lifestyle as well. I have recently undergone gastric sleeve surgery and had thought I would never be able to eat a sandwich ever again. Then I found the Paleo food movement and in particular your site. I have tried a lot of your recipes and this bread is my favorite. I love how moist it is and that it remains fresh for a full week. It also freezes well too. Thank you so much for re-introducing me to the sandwich.

I just made this recipe and it was AMAZING! I used almond meal (because I just made almond milk a few days ago, so the “meal” was what I had left over). It came out so moist, light and fluffy….not dense at all! Do you think it would freeze well? What would happen if I only put 3 eggs in? Have you tried less eggs? Thanks for posting such a great recipe!
If all else fails, this simple rule of thumb may make it really easy to shop for paleo foods. The layout of most grocery stores is quite simple: in the inner aisles you will typically find packaged, processed foods. Things like bread, pasta, cereal, flour, sugar, etc. For the most part, many of the foods stocked in the inner aisles of a grocery store will probably be "non-paleo approved items." 

I love this recipe and I like to tweak things. I came up with a tweak to make banana bread. Since holiday baking is my weakness and I had an almost suicidal reaction to wheat (I really know I’m allergic now) I wanted some banana bread. I subbed 1 cup of almond flour to walnut flour, omitted the ACV, added sweetener to taste, 1 tsp vanilla, 1 tsp pumpkin pie spice (sugar free) and 1 mashed banana. I LOVE banana so I also added a little banana flavoring. Baked up to a heavenly bread that I can eat without bloating and severe mood reactions!! I LOVE this site for recipes!! My next attempt will be either pumpkin bread or orange cranberry. Makes a great “I NEED SWEET” snack or breakfast as I’m zooming out the door.


Arrowroot Starch: You may also see arrowroot starch labeled as arrowroot flour or arrowroot powder. It’s made from tubers traditionally from a plant called Maranta arundinacea, but commercially it’s often found as a mixture of various starches, including starch from the cassava root. Similar to tapioca starch, arrowroot starch is used in paleo baking to improve the texture of baked goods, lightening them up a bit, and help with browning.
Alyssa, one more thing. Both the bowl and the beaters need to be spotlessly clean. If there is one hint of oil anywhere the whites will not beat properly. Nicole is correct about not using a plastic bowl. Plastic will even absorb oil to say nothing of the microscopic amounts that get into the surface when it’s scratched. When baking it is always best to use a metal or glass bowl for all of your mixing.
×