Legumes are members of a large family of plants that have a seed or pod. This category includes all beans, peas, lentils, tofu and other soyfoods, and peanuts. Legumes are not allowed on paleo because of their high content of lectins and phytic acid. Similar to grains, this is a point of controversy in the scientific community. In fact, lots of research supports eating legumes as part of a healthy diet because they are low in fat and high in fiber, protein and iron.

I have made the new recipe many times and it is really delicious. By mistake I used regular almond flour and the bread came out just as tasty as if I had used blanched almond flour. Also, coconut flour is not available where I live, so I substituted the same amount of unsweetened shredded coconut, and 1/4 cup oil for the coconut oil, since my friends said the bread had too much of a coconut flavor. The substitutions worked just fine and the bread was delicious!!! Maybe it would be even more delicious if I followed your recipe exactly, but even my son, who usually does not like “healthy” food, told me it was really good, and keeps helping himself to more slices everythime I make it.
I have just found your website and it is fantastic! Sitting at my computer my mouth is watering. I’m very new to the Gluten-free scene and am seriously considering Paleo as well so your website is a godsend. One question though, you mentioned how to measure the flour for your recipes and gave a weight in grams (thank you) but I have tried American recipes before and I think our tablespoon measure might be different also. How many millilitres is there in one of your tablespoon’s?
As I type I have my first loaf of Paleo Bread in the oven. I live in South Africa where we apparently don’t have any flax meal…so I imported some from your side of the world and can’t wait to taste the results. My daughter, who suffers with severe juvenile arthritis and for whom we all made the conversion to Paleo, and I made it together and experimented with your silver dollar pancakes for fun at the same time. Those were delicious and enjoyed with blueberries and a bit of honey.

If you have more questions on specific foods, we’ve included a comprehensive list of paleo diet foods below. We’ve provided a list of the foods that are allowed on the paleo diet. We’ve also broken this list down into the specific food groups, so you can see which meats, vegetables, fruits, nuts, and fats are on the paleo diet. In addition to all of that, we’ve also included a comprehensive list of foods not allowed on the paleo diet.

I have a problem, Im hoping someone here can help me with! I have a wheat allergy, very lactose intolerant, allergic to chick peas, and also sensitive to most other grains (rice flour is one the safe ones). I really thought the paleo diet would be able to help me, but Ive bought a cookbook, and look on various sites and most of the recipes call for coconut flour, coconut oil, coconut aminos, coconut crystals, or coconut milk; and I have a bad intolerance to coconut! Its not an allergy, but it will make me very uncomfortable for at least a cpl hours! I saw one question that was brought up, that said that almond flour and coconut flour are used for different reasons and connot be interchanged, so is there anything out there that can be used in replace of coconut oil, coconut flour, coconut aminos, and coconut crystals that will still make the recipes come out good?


Lexi! I just made this recipe for the first time yesterday to eat alongside our burgers – and they were PERFECT. Great consistency, nice flavor and best of all – the rolls retained their shape and didn’t rip like most buns do while eating the burgers. My husband loved them! We plan on making these on the regular. Thanks so much for creating/sharing this!


We cannot time travel and join our Paleo ancestors by the campfire as they prepare to eat; likewise, shards of ancient pottery and fossilized teeth can tell us only so much. If we compare the diets of so-called modern hunter-gatherers, however, we see just how difficult it is to find meaningful commonalities and extract useful dietary guidelines from their disparate lives (see infographic). Which hunter–gatherer tribe are we supposed to mimic, exactly? How do we reconcile the Inuit diet—mostly the flesh of sea mammals—with the more varied plant and land animal diet of the Hadza or !Kung? Chucking the many different hunter–gather diets into a blender to come up with some kind of quintessential smoothie is a little ridiculous. "Too often modern health problems are portrayed as the result of eating 'bad' foods that are departures from the natural human diet…This is a fundamentally flawed approach to assessing human nutritional needs," Leonard wrote. "Our species was not designed to subsist on a single, optimal diet. What is remarkable about human beings is the extraordinary variety of what we eat. We have been able to thrive in almost every ecosystem on the Earth, consuming diets ranging from almost all animal foods among populations of the Arctic to primarily tubers and cereal grains among populations in the high Andes.”


I know that soy can cause inflammation and if you are not using soy free eggs, that could be part of the cause. It may not be the actual egg but the soy that is the problem. just a thought. Here is an article that has some interesting info on soy. http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/07/29/soy-effects-on-women.aspx?e_cid=20120729_SNL_Art_1

Whenever I come across a recipe and I want to convert it to grams I use the amount on say my bag of almond flour and calculate it out. My almond flour weighs out to be 112 grams per cup so for this recipe you would use 224 grams of almond flour (I use superfine Kirkland brand from Costco and I’ve also used Bob’s Red Mill superfine and they both work equally well). The 2 tablespoons of coconut flour is a small amount so I wouldn’t bother weighing that out. As for the flax seed, I buy mine whole and measure accordingly and grind in my coffee grinder.
My son can’t have eggs, so I did MAJOR substitutions, and it still turned out yummy. We usually use flax for eggs, but since this recipe already calls for flax, I used 5 different eggs substitutes: 1/4 coconut yogurt, 1/3 cup applesauce, 1/4 cup vegetable oil (I used olive), 2 heaping tbsp potato starch, 2 heaping tbsp arrowroot powder. Perhaps because we couldn’t use the eggs, there wasn’t a hard crust, but again, it was still yummy. We have to make do in a no egg diet ;). I also didn’t have the correct size loaf pan, so I used two mini loaf pans and baked them for about 25 minutes. Hope someone sees this who has to eat an egg-free diet :).

— HOW I WORK IT: I am 10 years into maintaining my 35 lb weight loss, and it continues to be a conscious effort. Right now the best way I am able to include Elana’s recipes into my post-weight-loss and weight-maintenance life is by following the gaps diet, which includes hearty soups as the basis for eating, filled in by some nut baked goods. Enjoy!
A friend made this bread with pecans or walnuts because she had no almonds. She sent me home a slice after church this last week. I did not think I missed bread…OH MY Goodness. It is SO light. I loved every bite.I am very strict paleo because of allergies and blood sugar issuses keeps me low carb Paleo. Thank you so much for the HARD work of your experimentation. Love you. Lynn
Sounds like your baking soda is old and/or spoiled. It explains the lack of rise, tingling tongue, chemical taste (washing soda [sodium carbonate, I think] is made by heating baking soda [sodium bicarbonate] in big ovens), and maybe the extra salty flavor, too. I’ve had bad baking soda spoil baked goods, and it’s a real bummer. Hope you try again, though.
Thanks for taking the time to post the Metric measures Pat. I’ve just made my first loaf, which is ok but I misread the ingredients and only put 1/2 tsp of baking powder in the mix ..duh! There’s another one baking right now with the correct amount in . Really looking forward to it. I’m going to slice it up and freeze it in portions so I can take out what I need and toast it. The only downside for me is the almond flour and coconut flour is very expensive in the uk.
Hi, I just made these this morning. I substituted gelatin eggs for real eggs. I baked them on a cookie sheet—but next time I will put them on parchment paper because they did stick some. I also forgot the baking powder. I baked them for 20 mins. They were crunchy on the outside and gooey in the middle, but still delicious!! I also put them in the toaster after they came out of the oven. I would really love to come up with AIP recipe for these, because they are so darn good!! I probably could have gotten away with just one gelatin egg as well. I will have to experiment—-but if you come up with anything AIP in the future, please let us know! I love your blog!!

These researchers point out that there are plenty of reasons to suggest that the low-fat-is-good-health hypothesis has now effectively failed the test of time. In particular, that we are in the midst of an obesity epidemic that started around the early 1980’s, and that this was coincident with the rise of the low-fat dogma. (Type 2 diabetes, the most common form of the disease, also rose significantly through this period.)
The NY Times had a blog article on Good News on Saturated Fat which is reporting on Gary Taubes's interpretation of the new report in The New England Journal of Medicine on a two-year diet experiment in Israel. A followup is the post The Fat Fight Goes On where Gary rebuts the arguments against the study. And here's a good interview with Taubes (and includes a good summary): Gary Taubes on Cold Fusion, Good Nutrition and What Makes Bad (and Good) Science.
Divya, I’m happy to hear the flavor was great, but sorry to hear the bread was flat! I’ll try to help you troubleshoot…first I would check to make sure that your baking powder is fresh. Also, did you use the full cup of egg whites? Did you use a 9 by 5-inch loaf pan? Did you cook it at 350F and is your oven properly calibrated? Did you bake it for the amount of time the recipe calls for?

This recipe is so simple but so tasty. I use almond flour I grind myself (use a coffee grinder–it’s so much cheaper than buying bags of almond flour at the grocery store or online). The first loaf I made as stated and felt it was a little too much on the coconut. The second loaf I exchanged the coconut oil for bacon grease, which worked well but was a little too strong on the bacon. The third loaf I used half coconut oil and half bacon grease and I really love the taste. A little smear of almond butter and a dollop of jam really makes this a great Paleo breakfast!
For the dry bits, I would use a flour sifter or a sieve depending on what you have in the kitchen. Adding in the wet would require a spoon. The food processor simply takes out the labor of mixing it by hand. I haven’t made this one yet (tomorrow I will) but I’ve made banana bread more times than I can remember and only once has it been done in a food processor.
We do the honeyville and get it from Amazon. My Holistic practitioner is fanatical about food and food that has been grown with contaminated water and thus she gets all her food tested. This is one of the only ones she says is clean from contaminates from pesticides to hidden mercury and arsenic from contaminated water, etc. Whether it’ll always be that way who knows.
In order to simulate a bread-like texture without using gluten, grain free and gluten free bread recipes often use a variety of different flours and binders. We’ve tried so many keto bread recipes that taste way too eggy or too much like almonds or coconut. The trick is to find a combination of ingredients that yields good flavor, as well as bready texture and a loaf that rises nicely.
Just took this bread out the oven….YUM! I didn’t have arrowroot powder or cornstarch, so I substituted that for gluten-free all-purpose flour, and it came out amazing. I also substituted a the whole flax-seed with rolled oats, added 2 tbs of chia seeds (I wanted a high protein bread) The only thing I would add: 1tbsp of honey to cut a bit of the overly savory-taste. I used a 9″x4″ loaf pan, so my bread unfortunately isn’t sandwich bread height, but what can I do to fix that?? Just use a smaller pan or make more to fill out the volume better? I know others have asked the same question, but the only solution I saw, and felt was reasonable, was to make 1.5x the amount of mix….has anyone tried this? I was wondering if anyone has tried to use 2 whole eggs and 2 whites instead of 4 whole eggs….any insight as to how this would change the bread?
I love this recipe and I like to tweak things. I came up with a tweak to make banana bread. Since holiday baking is my weakness and I had an almost suicidal reaction to wheat (I really know I’m allergic now) I wanted some banana bread. I subbed 1 cup of almond flour to walnut flour, omitted the ACV, added sweetener to taste, 1 tsp vanilla, 1 tsp pumpkin pie spice (sugar free) and 1 mashed banana. I LOVE banana so I also added a little banana flavoring. Baked up to a heavenly bread that I can eat without bloating and severe mood reactions!! I LOVE this site for recipes!! My next attempt will be either pumpkin bread or orange cranberry. Makes a great “I NEED SWEET” snack or breakfast as I’m zooming out the door.

“I think there are a lot of positives about it,” Holley says. “It cuts out a lot of processed foods just naturally, like processed grains or added sugar through soft drinks or juice.” And because the diet promotes eating anti-inflammatory foods — like fruits, vegetables, and unsaturated fats in nuts and certain oils — your health could benefit, Holley explains. Cutting out processed foods and sugar will also help lower your risk of certain diseases, like type 2 diabetes and certain cancers, she says. (6)

I was wondering if anyone has any advice for me. I have a nonverbal two-year-old son. We are trying to move him off of grains completely, but the only thing I can get him to eat is an almond butter and honey sandwich. Just about every type of grain free bread I’ve tried he has discarded. I’m worried that he is so addicted to bread that it is limiting his world, not only are there different types of foods that he’s missing out on, but also his consumption of gluten may be affecting his development.
Primal Body-Primal Mind: Beyond the Paleo Diet for Total Health and a Longer Life by Nora Gedgaudas advocates a diet that our paleo ancestors ate. Meat, lots of fat, and seasonal fruits and berries when available. Basically, sugar and starchy carbs are discouraged. You can download a chapter from the author's site. She has a Primal Body, Primal Mind Radio weekly show on Voice of America. It started May 20, 2009, so there are many shows you can listen to. Published June 30, 2011.
i have been following your web page and i have made soooooo many things that my family loves the best being kale chips my 2 year old takes the bowl and runs away so no one can eat them. I am very very alergic to coconut. do you have any gluten free paleo like bread ideas to make? I live to make as much as possible from scratch.. i cant have gluten and my daughter and husband cant have dairy. if you have any ideas let me know. thank you so much I am such a big fan!

To come back on the diet not being paleo….u can adjust a little…use coconut oil and the coconut cream and then it is paleo as she already wrote down. I follow the paleo diet via the dr terry wahls protocol because off my ms and not aloud butter neither so I made a couple of changes and btw! With the paleo u are aloud to eat for example Ghee butter,go and look it up!!!

Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human by Richard Wrangham. This book argues that the ease of digestion and the added nutritional value available in cooked food was the key behind the explosion of human intelligence. (Cooking gelatinizes starch, denatures protein, and softens all foods, permitting more complete digestion and energy extraction. As a result, the food processing apparatus shrinks, freeing energy to support a larger brain.) He then suggests that cooking led to what eventually became marriage and the sexual division of labor. The two most helpful reviews at Amazon get into great detail. The reviews average to 4+ stars.
This spring, Dr Cordain did an interview answering ten questions about the basics of The Paleo Diet®. To start your New Years out right, we wanted to share his answers with you. We hope you enjoy! - The Paleo Diet Team 1. The Paleo diet can be traced to a 1975 book by Walter Voegtlin, but, correct me if I’m wrong, you are responsible for bringing this diet to popularity in your 2002 book “The Paleo Diet.” Can you me about your...

A few days ago I was delighted to learn that Dr. Oz was going to again feature The Paleo Diet on his nationally syndicated television show along with one of my co-authors, Nell Stephenson, of The Paleo Diet Cookbook. I tuned into the Dr. Oz show and was happy about most of what I saw except for Chris Kresser, expounding upon the health virtues of a food group, beans and legumes, that definitely are not Paleo. Please read the following...
I am having trouble finding the pan you recommended, it appears to be sold out everywhere I’ve looked??? I can find the 5.5×3.0 and the 9×5. Have you tested different sizes and if so do you have a cooking recommendation? I have tried gluten free recipes in regular loaf pan before and they never turn out….I realize I need a proper pan! Thanks for the help.
I made this for the first time today. I’m guessing here, but you may have mixed it too well, meaning the gas produced by the baking soda/yogurt/vinegar mixture was spent by the time you got it into the pan. No reaction means no gas, no gas means no lift. (I gently folded mine together and the rise brought it up above the top of the pan, just in the middle, but still.)
So, it’s my LAST DAY of the Whole30 (and perhaps yours, too!) the last day of January, and it’s time to welcome some Paleo treats back into my life.  And yours, of course.   It’s almost Valentines Day, right?!  And – maybe it’s just me – but I can’t do Valentines Day without my fair share of chocolate.   Luckily there are so many easy, deliciously indulgent chocolate recipes that taste classically rich but are made without any unhealthy ingredients.
I really do hope you read this. It may make a difference to some people. I know it makes a huge difference to me. I tried your paleo bread recipe and several other bread recipes on other websites. I kept tasting a bitter undertone in the bread. Every time it would just make me gag. I finally figured it out that it’s the almond flour. It makes sense now, since almonds DO have a bitter aftertaste. But it usually doesn’t matter when using whole or chopped almonds. So I tried your paleo bread recipe by replacing it with cashew flour. I had to make the flour myself in the vitamix blender, but it worked real well. AT LAST, NO BITTER UNDERTONE! I recommend informing people that cashew flour is an alternative. The only problem I have now is that it still doesn’t have that wheat bread taste. I tried increasing the flax seed meal to 1/2 cup and reducing the cashew flour to 1 3/4 cups but the flax seed meal still didn’t shine through. I know flax seed meal has the potential to create the taste. I intend to increase it further in my next attempt. BTW, I’m not worried about the phytoestrogens in flax seed because my naturopathic doctor says it doesn’t act like real estrogen.
Cordain explains that high intake of fruits and vegetables is one of best ways to reduce chances of cancer and heart disease. He notes that protein has twice the calorie burning effect of fat and carbs and is more satiating than both. He explains that starch, fats, sugars, and salts together cause us to keep eating. So if we limit our diet to fruits and vegetables and/or meat, we’ll stop eating when we’re full. And if you stop eating when you’re full, you’ll lose weight and won’t get fat. And as you lose weight, your cholesterol will improve (regardless of what you eat). This all makes sense and can’t really be disputed. If you want to lose weight, the Paleo diet will get you there and probably quickly. But Cordain’s hypothesis applied to long-term health falls short.
I didn’t measure my pan but when I baked this bread it was a bit flat also, so I cut the loaf in half, and then sliced each half into bread sized pieces. It worked perfectly for full sized pieces that looked like ‘normal’ bread. I cannot get over how easy and delicious this bread is. My sweet son can have no grains, and no honey….so I left out the honey and added 1 tsp of xylitol. So so good. And this morning when I toasted a piece for him, he thought I made a mistake and gave him ‘real’ bread!
I made dressing/stuffing out of this bread! I cut the bread into slices, then cut the slices into cubes. I put them on a metal pan and into my toaster oven on low temperature and let them crisp up. It takes a good while, but they DO get crisp! Then I have my croutons for the dressing. The dressing I made was delicious. I think the next time I make the bread to use for croutons I’m going to add onion powder and sage to the mixture before baking so the croutons will be seasoned some before I begin making the dressing! Love this bread! It is the most like wheat flour bread that I have tried! Thanks Maya!
Hi Sally, thanks for your comment and kind words. I mostly bake with almond flour and coconut flour because they are much lower carb than other gluten-free flours. Unfortunately, I don’t think they are elastic enough to make pita bread. When we have falafel and other foods that are typically served with some type of bread product, I serve in a lettuce wrap which takes next to no time to prepare, is low carb, and very healthy. Sorry I can’t be of more help!
The Paleo diet cuts out all grains, legumes, dairy and added sugar with the intent to get your body feeling good and your gut healthy. While a dessert that’s Paleo doesn’t justify indulging in a sweet treat every day, it does cut out any processed refined ingredients that are killing your waistline. Using natural ingredients like coconut sugar, coconut oil, and maple syrup (instead of white sugar) can have a major impact on your blood sugar spikes and reduce those continuous cravings that come along with them. Instead of going for those mysterious desserts, go back to a human diet and get your nutrition on with real food! 

thanks for the reply, but im still confused. the arrowroot you have pictured at the bottom of the recipe is the “flour” not the powder. I used the powder. however, it was hard to find and the only bottle of it that I could find was short of the 1/2 cup required in the recipe. I see you can buy larger quantities of the powder on-line. I added a TBSP of regular baking powder to make up for the short arrowroot powder. It came out pretty good!


What did I do wrong? This came out VERY moist… like a banana bread. Nothing like loaf/sandwich bread. I did end up cooking it nearly 31 minutes because pick still wasn’t coming out clean. Mine seems much darker too. I didn’t use the flax seeds (daughter has a sensory issue with nuts/seeds in breads) (You’ll notice I put sesame seeds on half for me…would that make it that much different? I used the proper size – but glass pan (all I have in loaf style) Flavor is good… but far too dense to consider using for a sandwich and not sure how Biikeweaver got 18 servings (!?) from this size loaf pan? But THANK YOU for posting. This was my FIRST attempt, so I’ll try again!

So, just as I was about to put these in the oven, my 20 year old oven caught fire. After having the fire department visit, I used coconut oil spray on a glass square dish and cooked it in the microwave. Total time was about 8 minutes because I kept stopping and starting it. The recipe was delicious! Thank you to our fire department and to you for this wonderful bread alternative!
I’ve been looking for a great gf, low carb, yeasted bread recipe and this one is perfect! I didn’t have enough flaxseed meal so subbed chia seeds and didn’t grind them but it turned out fine. Didn’t have whey protein isolate so used collagen powder. I like a lot of texture so added 1/4 rounded cup of pumpkin seeds and same amount of sunflower seeds. My loaf rose to only about 2 1/2″ high but it has a nice crumb and wonderful flavor. Definitely my bread of choice now!!
this looks amazing! i am low carb, so this will work for me as opposed to some of your other gluten free breads! i cant have arrowroot powder and other similar ingredients. that being said, i love ALL your recipes and even if they contain ingredients i cant have, they are usually easy to substitute or ‘play’ around with until i get it low carb friendly;) thankfully, you have done the work for me here;)thanks!!!!!

The following links tend towards news reports of scientific studies that point out some positive aspect of the paleo diet. If you are looking for current news reports, I suggest signing up for Google Alerts for the Type: News. I have three set up, for: "caveman diet," "paleo diet," and "paleolithic diet." You can also set them up for blogs and/or websites.
I just used a 9 x 5 pan and did not change the recipe proportions at all. Since this is the only loaf pan I have, instead, I pushed the dough against one side of the pan and formed a small loaf that is closer to the 7.5 x 3.5 pan size that Elana says to use. The dough was sticky enough to hold together fine and did not collapse or spread out during baking. It’s not the most beautiful creation, but it’s proportioned OK and tastes fine. I say – make it work with what you have and you’ll be alright.

Paleo desserts are some of my favorite things to make because they’re often filled with nutrient-dense ingredients and they don’t make you feel like garbage after eating them. Of course, balance and moderation with all things. But I love when you can make paleo desserts healthy and your friends and family have no idea that what they’re eating is actually fairly good for them 🙂
I am BLOWN away by this bread! I added up the protein and net carbs … umm … WOW. A huge bonus is that both kids – one of whom is crazy picky – AND my husband both love it!!!! They devoured the first loaf within a few hours. This will obviously be a huge staple in our house. It’s really a God-send. Our son, who is the picky eater, is mostly picky about proteins. He won’t eat any meat except for chicken, no eggs or dairy. We’ve gone gluten/casein free to see if it helps with his autism and as much as I totally wanted to eliminate bread, I finally just had to accept that he HAD to eat a peanut butter and honey sandwich at lunch. My cracker/veggie/peanut butter dip thing just wasn’t working. Not only will he EAT this bread – he wouldn’t eat the other gluten-free breads I was making – it is actually giving him the ONE thing he needs most – PROTEIN. Seriously, thank you, thank you, thank you!!!!!!!!!!!!!
By far my favorite bread recipe! It turned out golden brown with a great flavor! Super easy and basic ingredients so you don’t have to run to the supermarket before making it. I asked my husband (not paleo or gluten free) to taste it and he thought it was good. That’s quite a compliment because he dislikes most gluten free/paleo things. Just a note, I’m at 9300 feet above sea level and it still raised and turned out delicious!

Research into the weight loss effects of the paleolithic diet has generally been of poor quality.[10] One trial of obese postmenopausal women found improvements in weight and fat loss after six months, but the benefits had ceased by 24 months; side effects among participants included "weakness, diarrhea, and headaches".[10] In general, any weight loss caused by the diet is merely the result of calorie restriction, rather than a special feature of the diet itself.[10]

Jan Engvald has studied food and health thoroughly in the literature. In Unexpected facts on... food he shows that today's health advice (more or less unchanged for more than 30 years) is a direct cause to the increase in national diseases like coronary heart disease, stroke, cancer, obesity, adult-onset diabetes, allergy, eye diseases, etc. His findings are low-carb and high-fat, close to paleo, though he allows high fat dairy.

With a very simple shift we not only remove the foods that are at odds with our health (grains, legumes, and dairy) but we also increase our intake of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. Here is a great paper from Professor Loren Cordain exploring how to build a modern Paleo diet: The nutritional characteristics of a contemporary diet based upon Paleolithic food groups. This paper also offers significant insight as to the amounts and ratios of protein, carbohydrate and fat in the ancestral diet.


Oils are trickier. Loren Cordain, Ph.D., founder of The Paleo Diet Movement, breaks down which oils are healthy on the paleo diet: olive, walnut, flaxseed, macadamia, avocado and coconut oils are all allowed because they were gathered directly from the plant. While our hunter-gatherer ancestors probably did not consume flaxseed oil, it is allowed because of its content of high alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), a type of heart-healthy, anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty acid.
I wish I had taken a photo because this bread is gorgeous! My husband (who is anti-healthy food) said “I see bread like that and I want to eat it…but since you told me it was made with almonds I won’t, out of spite”…and then 10 minutes later…”that would taste really good toasted with butter” (and a big chunk was missing from the loaf). So easy to make with ingredients I always have on hand. Bravo! I will be making this weekly!
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