Advocates of the diet argue that the increase in diseases of affluence after the dawn of agriculture was caused by changes in diet, but others have countered that it may be that pre-agricultural hunter-gatherers did not suffer from the diseases of affluence because they did not live long enough to develop them.[30] Based on the data from hunter-gatherer populations still in existence, it is estimated that at age 15, life expectancy was an additional 39 years, for a total age of 54.[31] At age 45, it is estimated that average life expectancy was an additional 19 years, for a total age of 64 years.[32][33] That is to say, in such societies, most deaths occurred in childhood or young adulthood; thus, the population of elderly – and the prevalence of diseases of affluence – was much reduced. Excessive food energy intake relative to energy expended, rather than the consumption of specific foods, is more likely to underlie the diseases of affluence. "The health concerns of the industrial world, where calorie-packed foods are readily available, stem not from deviations from a specific diet but from an imbalance between the energy humans consume and the energy humans spend."[34]
According to the model from the evolutionary discordance hypothesis, "[M]any chronic diseases and degenerative conditions evident in modern Western populations have arisen because of a mismatch between Stone Age genes and modern lifestyles."[26] Advocates of the modern Paleo diet have formed their dietary recommendations based on this hypothesis. They argue that modern humans should follow a diet that is nutritionally closer to that of their Paleolithic ancestors.
I wish I had taken a photo because this bread is gorgeous! My husband (who is anti-healthy food) said “I see bread like that and I want to eat it…but since you told me it was made with almonds I won’t, out of spite”…and then 10 minutes later…”that would taste really good toasted with butter” (and a big chunk was missing from the loaf). So easy to make with ingredients I always have on hand. Bravo! I will be making this weekly!
Success! My very first attempt at baking “paleo”. This is very tasty and so very easy. I used the recipe with honey and coconut oil. I recently shifted my diet to low carb and no sugar, and really needed a bread that fit the new diet. This is perfect. THANK YOU for sharing the years of experience and knowledge you have with cooking Paleo. I think the size of the pan is very important to get a rise out of the mixture, so folks just follow this fool proof recipe and enjoy. I bought your recent book, Paleo Cooking, on iTunes so it is easy to have the recipe at my fingertip on my phone right there in the kitchen.
This is amazingly similar to real bread. I made a few changes, but I’m so happy with how it turned out! I can’t wait to make this for my Mom. Next time I will double the recipe to get normal sized bread. The changes I made were that I used 3 eggs and 1 chia egg. I also baked 10 extra minutes because of all the complaints about a doughy center, but ended up overbaking. Next time I will stick to the original baking time. Thank you so much Elana! I love your vegan herb crackers as well; I eat vegan 4 times a week and they are life savers! Definitely a staple. I can tell that they are one of the things I will be taking to college with me once I graduate in 2 years :)
Hi Faith, I make a similar bread almost every day (from the Plant Paradox Cookbook), and it calls for full fat coconut milk…it works great as well. I will try your apple cider vinegar today, as the recipe I’ve been using calls for red wine vinegar. Thanks so much for posting, and thank you for the Arrowroot substitution…sometimes it can be a challenge to find! :-D
Nourishing Traditions: The Cookbook that Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and the Diet Dictocrat by Mary G. Enig, Ph.D. and Sally Fallon. The premise is the culinary traditions of our ancestors, and the food choices and preparation techniques of healthy nonindustrialized peoples, should serve as the model for contemporary eating habits. However, they push whole grains and dairy, which aren't Paleolithic.
Eat WELL Feel GOOD: Practical Paleo Living by Diane Frampton has over 200 recipes that makes paleo eating simple, delicious, and ultimately, intuitive. So they claim. There are only a few reviews at Amazon. They all like the book, but their lack of details makes it appear that they are not truly independent reviews. The recipes have a Crossfit appeal to them. Chef Rachel Albert has made some of the recipes and posted here [archive.org].

First things first. And this is of utmost importance. Woot Woot is STILL cool. Says me. Because I say it all the time, so it just HAS to be cool, right?! Wait, since I’m the most uncool person on the planet, you probably should stop saying woot woot immediately. 😉 Second, I had ZERO clue you used to be an almond butter-making maniac! Oh I wish I was your bestie during THAT fun phase of your life! Now you are just a no-bake brainiac! (<– see what I did there?). These bars are FAB, just like all the rest of your no-bake bars! They look super creamy and uber dreamy… and most dangerous, because who in the world could eat just one (or 5) of these babies?! SO GOOD! Pinned of course! Cheers, sweets! And haaaaappy Galentine's Day!! XOXOXOX 
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