Even if eating only foods available to hunter–gatherers in the Paleolithic made sense, it would be impossible. As Christina Warinner of the University of Zurich emphasizes in her 2012 TED talk, just about every single species commonly consumed today—whether a fruit, vegetable or animal—is drastically different from its Paleolithic predecessor. In most cases, we have transformed the species we eat through artificial selection: we have bred cows, chickens and goats to provide as much meat, milk and eggs as possible and have sown seeds only from plants with the most desirable traits—with the biggest fruits, plumpest kernels, sweetest flesh and fewest natural toxins. Cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts and kale are all different cultivars of a single species, Brassica oleracea; generation by generation, we reshaped this one plant's leaves, stems and flowers into wildly different arrangements, the same way we bred Welsh corgis, pugs, dachshunds, Saint Bernards and greyhounds out of a single wolf species. Corn was once a straggly grass known as teosinte and tomatoes were once much smaller berries. And the wild ancestors of bananas were rife with seeds.
Made this for the first time and after reading all the reviews about dense and not rising, decided to separate egg whites and yolks and whisk first the whites and then the yolks to increase volume, as one would for a sponge cake. Must confess to adding a pinch of cream of tartar to the whites, ( this is one of the ingredients in baking powder so shouldn’t upset the purists). I also only had almond meal ( trader joes) unblanched, and substituted fresh lime juice for the vinegar and used 1tbsp olive oil, didn’t have coconut oil. Once all three bowls were mixed thoroughly (1.whites, 2.yolks plus honey, oil and lime juice, and 3. dry ingredients whizzed tog. In processor,) gently fold all together, yolk mix into whites, then dry mix into egg mix . Put into oiled loaf pan and bake as directed……….it turned out just perfect and delicious……..looks like the picture only much darker because of the almond meal…..more like a whole wheat loaf would look…I am so pleased, the added step is worth the trouble, it rose to the top of the pan and very light and easy to slice.

These are the best rolls I have ever had I have been gluten-free and Paleo for at least eight years and this is by far the best thank you so much for the recipe will make all the time have tried many many recipes just didn’t like him this is absolutely perfect. Also made them in a muffin tin pan just perfect for sandwiches or hamburgers or sloppy Joe’s.


It’s easy to find more guidance online, but a book also makes a handy reference. "The Paleo Diet," for example, outlines basic Paleo principles and offers three “levels” that allow for different degrees of cheating – three “open meals” per week on the “entry level” plan, two on “maintenance” and just one on “maximal.” Depending on the level, you might also get “transitional” condiments (low-fat dressing and salsa) and drinks (coffee, beer or wine in moderation) to wash down the meat and plants. You can use the levels as you like. Start with the first and move gradually to the more restrictive – or just stay put. For more dramatic changes, head right to the third.
A strict paleo diet does not allow dairy products because hunter-gatherers did not milk cows. Some paleo dieters say dairy is OK, especially if it is grass-fed because grass-fed butter, for example, has more omega-3s. Fermented dairy products are also OK for some paleo eaters because they have a lower content of lactose and casein, the two concerns paleo dieters have with dairy.
I made the amended version of this yesterday (in the Parrish pan) and it turned out great. I have an oven thermometer that confirmed the 350-degree oven temperature, but the bread took another ten minutes (40 altogether) in the oven before it toothpick-tested done. Testing for doneness this way is nothing more than I would expect of any kind of baking. The bread tastes wonderful.
These are AMAZING! I have celiac and was diagnosed about 4 months ago. It’s been very difficult and bread is what I miss most. Unfortunately, GF bread is not very tasty-i’ve tried a number of brands and have tried making my own. I love the simplicity of the recipe as well. Thank you for creating amazing clean recipes, your cookie bars are also fabulous!

Wonderful recipe; made it today and will make it again. Two changes I had to make: having no golden milled flax, I had brown flax seeds which I ground in my food processor, (didn’t get as fine as milled). Also had no arrowroot, so used tapioca flour. Delighted with the results. It rose beautifully, had to bake it a few more minutes; the top was a bit less smooth than yours, and the texture is probably a bit different due to fax seed not being as fine as milled. It is still a keeper as it holds together well after slicing. My husband (not paleo) made disparaging remarks when I told him I was making paleo bread, but he ate two thick slices with butter before I snatched it away. He says it won’t hold together for sandwich, but I will make him eat his words tomorrow. Thanks for the wonderful recipe! When this is gone, I am going to make the multi-seed and nut bread.

You’ve gotta love the folks over at TGIPaleo, they really know their stuff and it seems they’re always tinkering around in the caveman kitchens trying to whip up palatable Paleo food that keeps you within the Paleo guidelines. Here they’re doing their best to perfect the art of Paleo bread making, and they seem to have gotten it right on this one. Just to be sure they’ve gone and replicated their efforts in second version, covered below. They’ve used a combination of coconut flour, ground flax for heartiness, fiber and omega-3s, and arrowroot flour for added texture and taste.
I made the dinner rolls today and the recipe worked great. I lightly greased a muffin pan, used a scant half cup of batter for each roll, baked for 15-18 minutes and they are perfect for holiday dinners. My yeild was 13 rolls. Good thing there was extra, because I ate one hot from the oven. I also used coconut vinegar and coconut nectar instead of apple cider vinegar and honey. Yum, Yum, Yum

For the dry bits, I would use a flour sifter or a sieve depending on what you have in the kitchen. Adding in the wet would require a spoon. The food processor simply takes out the labor of mixing it by hand. I haven’t made this one yet (tomorrow I will) but I’ve made banana bread more times than I can remember and only once has it been done in a food processor.

Thank you for so much for experimenting until you developed this delicious recipe! We (me, husband, 12yo daughter, 10yo son) just finished Paleo restart, 30 days. My son has been so desperate to have bread, now he can have nut butter & homemade jelly sandwiches! He’s ecstatic…me too! ???? ???? ???? Thanks for sharing…it’s because of people like you that are making this journey not so overwhelming!
Paleo Comfort Foods: Homestyle Cooking in a Gluten-Free Kitchen by Julie Sullivan Mayfield and Charles Mayfield. Implementing paleo guidelines and principles in this book (no grains, no gluten, no legumes, no dairy), the Mayfields give you 100+ recipes and full color photos with entertaining stories throughout. The recipes in Paleo Comfort Foods can help individuals and families alike lose weight, eat healthy and achieve optimum fitness, making this way of eating sustainable, tasty and fun. The many reviews at Amazon are basically flawless. The sole complaint is over the lack of nutritional information. But there is no counting on the paleo diet and its inclusion would have been inappropriate. Published September 10, 2011.
As for the mixing…I mixed the dry ingredients in one bowl, then separated the egg yolks and whites, in bowls. I whipped the whites until they were thick. I added the yolks to the whites, and added the honey and oil. I mixed that up. I added the wet to the dry and mixed. It was really thick. Then I combined the baking soda and vinegar, mixing them. I added them to the whole mix and slightly stirred.

I made this bread recipe today using the ingredients shown in the recipe. Since I don’t own small sized bread pans I cooked this in my enamelled cast iron LeCreuset Pate Terrine with a parchment paper liner. It made a long low loaf, perfect for smaller sandwiches or for hors d’oeuvres with a gorgeous crust. I was a little worried about the coconut oil taste being dominant in the bread but thankfully, it wasn’t. I sprinkled raw sunflower seeds all the way down the top of the loaf. I poured some apple cider vinegar into my tablespoon but finished off the amount with boiled cider to add to the apple flavor.
Thank you Elena! I Used a 500g William Sonoma non-stick loaf pan (a tad larger than suggested) and ground whole brown flax seeds in my spice grinder because I had them on hand in the freezer. Also, mixed in a small amount of unblanched almond flour with the blancheds because I had some to use up and used my grandmother’s old manual hand mixer rather than a food processor (don’t own one). My apartment smelled absolutely delicious when this was baking… nutty, earthy, eggy… I suspect the addition of the unblanched flour and regular flax deepened the color and flavor of the final product. It doesn’t look at all like your bread but rather has a deep brown multigrain look and cracked top. Even took some pictures. Very happy with this one. Easy, tasty, and so much better looking and tasting than most gf bread I’ve had. Texture is consistent all the way through and slices beautifully. I’ve sworn off the stuff but this wholesome paleo-friendly loaf has me sold. Can’t wait to try it on a sandwich tomorrow. So sick of salads for lunch. BTW tried the rosemary crackers last week and they were fantastic as well.
Trick And Treat - how 'healthy eating' is making us ill by Barry Groves. The author is one of the world's most outspoken proponents of a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet. This book is an account of how and why the health-care establishment has got the concept of 'healthy eating' so wrong. Whereas Taubes work (see above) is a fairly straight forward review of the existing science, Groves expands into the politics of medical research and treatment to a much greater extent. "Trick and Treat" is divided into two parts. Part One describes the corruption in the health industry, points out the problems inherent in a high-carb, low-fat diet, and then prescribes a diet that leads to good health. The prescribed diet is high in fat - specifically animal fat, not polyunsaturated vegetable fat - and low in carbohydrates, with 60-70% of calories from fat, 15-25% of calories from protein, and a mere 10-15% of calories from carbohydrates. Part Two describes numerous diseases the author claims are the result of high carbohydrate consumption. These range from life-threatening disorders such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer to less serious problems such as acne, near-sightedness and dental problems. The Amazon reviews average to 4+ stars.
Paleonutrition by Mark Q. Sutton, Kristin D. Sobolik, and Jill K. Gardner is the analysis of prehistoric human diets and the interpretation of dietary intake in relation to health and nutrition. This is a substantial text that combines background to paleonutrition, an extensive bibliography, a discussion on methods, and case studies. Published February 23, 2010.
So since you are making your own sunflower seed flour, I would recommend you sift it to remove any large chunks. Then when you mix the wet and dry, add a small amount of the dry mixture to the wet and mix, then add the rest of the dry mixture to the wet, and mix to combine everything. I don’t think over mixing will be an issue here, except if you whipped your eggs, which in that case you may want to mix the eggs in the batter last.
After microwaving for 90 seconds, let it cool for a minute or two before popping it out of the container (it should come out easily if you’ve greased it). Then slice and eat. As, Tammy Credicott suggested in her version of this recipe in Paleo Indulgences, toasting the slices also works well (I use the broiler on 550F for 2 minutes, but a toaster oven or oven would work too).
Drop Grok into the Hiwi's midst—or indeed among any modern or ancient hunter–gather society—and he would be a complete aberration. Grok cannot teach us how to live or eat; he never existed. Living off the land or restricting oneself to foods available before agriculture and industry does not guarantee good health. The human body is not simply a collection of adaptations to life in the Paleolithic—its legacy is far greater. Each of us is a dynamic assemblage of inherited traits that have been tweaked, transformed, lost and regained since the beginning of life itself. Such changes have not ceased in the past 10,000 years.
Knowing what to eat is part of it, but following this fairly restrictive lifestyle in a modern environment surrounded by cookies and candy and bagels and pasta is really difficult! Factor in the “carb flu” you might go through in the first few weeks (as your body gets weaned off of carbohydrate fuel and habits), and most people give up on the Paleo diet long before it creates lasting change!

I tried this today. I used flax instead of chia bc I had it in my pantry. I sliced and toasted it, and served it with a roasted butternut squash soup on a freezing cold day. I was very impressed! Right out of the microwave it seems disturbingly eggy. But after toasting it, the texture was so bread-like. I can’t wait to make this for my husband who just jumped on the paleo wagon. Thanks for a great, simple recipe.
My loaf came out beautifully, just like a regular loaf. The toothpick came out clean – twice! – but when I got past the third slice, the middle was hollow and the edges of the hollow area was raw.I cut it out and ate the rest, but I’m puzzled why the toothpick came out dry when it wasn’t cooked through. It is, however, the best gf bread I’ve ever had, and I will make it again. I did have to convert the temperature to Celsius, and I have a fan oven, so I will check that out.
These photos look amazing so I’m making these right now. I want to warn everyone, not all coconut cream is really coconut cream! I purchased two cans of “Sprouts” brand coconut cream from Spouts supermarket. After I drained the liquid, I did not get even one cup of cream out of one can so I opened another. After adding the honey and mixing, the “cream” remained lumpy and watery. I put the whole mess in my Blendtec to whip it and it turned into milk!

So.. let’s talk about the needed part. Quick, what’s the one thing you can’t live without, food wise? That you NEED!! Here’s what I hear a lot when I explain the Paleo or grain free style of eating. “Oh my Goodness, how can I live without bread or a good sandwich bread?” Well ya, bread is so delicious and I don’t always make paleo bread, but when I do, it’s usually for a good reason.
Palm nuts and heart (Mauritia flexuosa)Brazilian Teal (Amazonetta brasiliensis)Wild root "Yatsiro" (Canna edulis)Red Brocket deer (Mazama americana)Wild root "No'o" (Dioscorea)Wild root "Oyo" (Banisteriopsis)Armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus)Guava (Psidium guava)Yellow-spotted river turtle (Podocnemis unifilis)Wild root "Hewyna" (Calathea allouia)Mata Mata turtle (Chelus fimbriatus)Capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris)Silver Mylosomma (Mylossoma duriventre)Iguana (Iguana iguana)Iguana (Iguana iguana)Orange (Citrus x sinensis)Roseate Spoonbill (Ajaja ajaja)Roseate Spoonbill (Ajaja ajaja)Collared peccary (Pecari tajacu)Wild rabbit (Sylvilagus varynaensis)Piranha (Serrasalmus)Trahira (Hoplias malabaricus)Collared anteater (Tamandua tetradactyla)Gold Tegu (Tupinambis teguixin)Mangoes (Mangifera)Wild legume "Chiga" (Campsiandra comosa)South American catfish (Pseudoplatystoma)Charichuelo (Garcinia madruno)Yellow-footed tortoise (Chelonoidis denticulata)Caiman (Caiman crocodilus)

I’ve put together a roundup of 45 (that’s a lot!) recipes for Paleo-friendly / Paleo desserts. These will definitely come in handy for special occasions, birthdays, holidays, or for Wednesday night emergencies. I’m sorry Whole30 hasn’t completely changed my way of thinking yet… Let’s be real. I’m just being a realist and planning ahead, I know there will be days with chocolate in the forecast.
If you’ve been laying off the magic 7 layer magic cookie bars this holiday season because of their layers of processed sugars and fats, I have some good news for you.  We can make these magical bars of goodness PALEO, VEGAN and CLEAN so you can treat yourself and still maintain your healthy eating goals!  How do we do it? To make my 7 layer bar recipe…

If you’re an English muffin lover it won’t be long before you’re hit with a craving and won’t know what to do to stay on track with your Paleo diet. This English muffin recipe does away with the grains and delivers true muffin taste nonetheless. These have all the little holes and crevices you’d expect from any respectable English muffin, and you can feel free to spread organic grass-fed butter over this, or some nice organic ghee for an out of this world totally Paleo experience.
Oh my goodness. I’m new to your site and this is the first recipe I have tried. It really is SUCH a tasty, flavorful bread. I did make some changes. I followed a comment on your pinterest pin for this recipe, and the person who tried it recommended 1/2 tsp xanthem gum in place of 1/2 cup arrowroot powder. I did this to lower the carb count and because arrowroot was the only ingredient I was lacking. It reminds me of a somewhat sweet, but still savory wheat flavored corn muffin. I’m sorry if that’s confusing. It’s a bit more tender/crumbly than sandwich bread though, and I do think that has to do with my substitution. For this reason it might be too delicate to support a sandwich. Regardless, it’s delicious as a side in a dish. I actually prefer it that way. Thank you again for sharing. So thankful.
Thank you for this amazing recipe! I didn’t have rings so I used 3 of my 4″ pyrex glass dishes to make 3 buns. I love the texture and the taste is mild. I initially made them for burger buns but now I see they can be so versatile – egg sammies, toast with jam, eggs benedict, mini pizzas, burgers, and so on. Can’t wait to make them again – this is going to be a staple in my house! Thank you!!
I just made this recipe and it was AMAZING! I used almond meal (because I just made almond milk a few days ago, so the “meal” was what I had left over). It came out so moist, light and fluffy….not dense at all! Do you think it would freeze well? What would happen if I only put 3 eggs in? Have you tried less eggs? Thanks for posting such a great recipe!
I think red meat from grain fed cattle and sheep IS bad for us . These animals were designed to eat grass. We were designed to eat meat, fat, vegetables , a few seeds and a little seasonal fruit. But never any kind of grain. ! When Man began farming and grain consumption , so began disease and illness. Today our food supply is being contaminated by Factory farming and GMOs.
This is a complete list of foods not allowed on the paleo diet. It’s a sad day when you first have to say goodbye to these foods but, once you start, it’s much easier and you find there are even better paleo substitutes for these foods. The first few weeks might be tough, but if you stick with it over time, it’ll be worth it. We promise. Here’s the ultimate list of foods not allowed on the paleo diet.
I pinned your first roll recipe, but when I tried to go back to it – had disappeared. So because I make it often, repinned it. I noticed this time palm oil had been removed. I always used coconut oil instead. Anyway – just wondered why and if there is a difference in texture? I went ahead and added coconut oil because I’ve been so happy with the way I’ve been making them. (They slide out of pan which I like, with oil) One of my favorite and go to recipes – the only bread I eat. Thanks.
Hi I made the Easy paleo keto bread 5 ingredients. It was moist, texture was good but it didn’t turn out completely white, more like a pale yellow and the crust was overdone. I opted for honey as my sweetner because this bread is for my nephew who has autism and we want to keep it as natural as possible. I baked the bread exactly at 325 for 40mins uncovered and then another 40mins covered (tent). What could I do next time to achieve a white bread with golden crust?
When you are separating the eggs if you use the method of pouring the egg from one half of the shell to the other you have to be extremely careful because the sharp shell can easily break the yolk. There are tools that you can purchase that will cradle the yolk and let the white run into a separate bowl. Or, you can use your hands. You need to make sure that your hands are extremely clean and fresh from being washed. Break the egg into one hand and let the white slip between your slightly separate fingers. The yolk will settle into your hand and the white will slip off into the bowl.
Hi Jen, It sounds like it needed to bake for longer – this is why it sunk and was still moist. The timing varies by ovens and even different pans. I hope you’ll try it again and just keep it in there for longer. You can cover the top if it starts to brown too much. For the one you made, depending on how moist it was in the middle, you may be able to salvage it somewhat by pan frying the slices.

I used greek yogurt instead of sour cream and it worked well. Same as many of the other comments, I did not get as much rise as I was hoping for (after 90 minutes), but the bread is very tasty with a nice crumb. I cut into 16 slices. One thing I was wondering, your recipe for cinnamon buns has 2 packets of yeast, this has only one. Would adding more yeast help rise better?
While this sounds good in theory, scientists have a problem with its accuracy. “Anthropologists familiar with our Paleolithic ancestors’ behavior agree that these early humans did not follow any one style of eating. Basically, they ate whatever and whenever they could," said Neal Malik, an assistant professor at the School of Natural Health Arts and Sciences of Bastyr University. "They didn’t purposely follow a ‘clean’ diet — they just ate whatever was available to ensure survival. In fact, some scientists have gone so far as to say that early humans had a diet similar to pigs."
Some Paleo dieters emphasize that they never believed in one true caveman lifestyle or diet and that—in the fashion of Sisson's Blueprint—they use our evolutionary past to form guidelines, not scripture. That strategy seems reasonably solid at first, but quickly disintegrates. Even though researchers know enough to make some generalizations about human diets in the Paleolithic with reasonable certainty, the details remain murky. Exactly what proportions of meat and vegetables did different hominid species eat in the Paleolithic? It's not clear. Just how far back were our ancestors eating grains and dairy? Perhaps far earlier than we initially thought. What we can say for certain is that in the Paleolithic, the human diet varied immensely by geography, season and opportunity. "We now know that humans have evolved not to subsist on a single, Paleolithic diet but to be flexible eaters, an insight that has important implications for the current debate over what people today should eat in order to be healthy," anthropologist William Leonard of Northwestern University wrote in Scientific American in 2002.
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