Overall, the diet is high in protein, moderate in fat (mainly from unsaturated fats), low-moderate in carbohydrate (specifically restricting high glycemic index carbohydrates), high in fiber, and low in sodium and refined sugars. [2] The monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats (including the omega-3 fats EPA and DHA) come from marine fish, avocado, olive oil, and nuts and seeds.
When it comes to Paleo desserts, this one is top notch; your taste buds will go wild for this pie-turned-ice-cream that’s also dairy-free! You’ll use coconut cream and almond milk to make a velvety smooth consistency with a perfect crunch from the pecans. Nuts like pecans are said to help aid weight loss since they enhance satiety and boost your metabolism!
I made this tonight and used 1.5 cups almond flour, 1/2 cup tapioca starch, subbed chia meal for flax meal, subbed avocado oil for coconut oil, and added 1.5 T caraway seeds to give it a bit of a “rye bread taste”. We had it with corned beef tonight and it was very good. I did two mini loafs which took the same amount of cooking time. My husband and older son are usually very picky about paleo breads and they both gave it a thumbs up… I think because they both like the taste of caraway. Thanks for the recipe!
Elizabeth, This recipe is a bit heavy on the eggs because they add structure here; without them, it would be difficult to get the same height without doing quite a bit of experimentation to find a suitable substitute. If you’re looking for a paleo-friendly bread-type of recipe, my Paleo Flatbread may be more useful. It’s more of a wrap or can be made thinner into a crepe, rather than a loaf of bread, but it is delicious. That recipe uses one egg, but I’ve successfully made it using a flax “egg” instead of a regular egg. Sorry I’m not able to be more help, but I hope you like the flatbread if you give it a try!
Buried in the middle of The Revised Metabolic Oncolytic Regimen for Effecting Lysis in Solid Tumors one can find their diet recommendations for tumor control. It has a paleo diet orientation. Protein is 35%, preferably Omega 3 rich. Carbohydrates (also 35%) are only vegetables and fruit, no beans, bread, potatoes, or any grain. Then dietary and supplemental forms of fat should provide 20-30% of (daily) calories.

For most people the fact the Paleo diet delivers the best results is all they need. Improved blood lipids, weight loss, and reduced pain from autoimmunity is proof enough.  Many people however are not satisfied with blindly following any recommendations, be they nutrition or exercise related. Some folks like to know WHY they are doing something. Fortunately, the Paleo diet has stood not only the test of time, but also the rigors of scientific scrutiny.
Experts estimate that our ancestors consumed a one-to-one ratio of calories from meats to produce. Since you have to eat a lot of salad to consume the same amount of calories in a steak, the paleo diet should ideally include mostly fruits and vegetables, Katz says. However, many people don't realize that and eat too much meat. Consuming excess protein and not enough carbs can cause kidney damage and also increase your risk of osteoporosis, Dr. Ochner says. Plus, since most of today's meats are higher in saturated fat than those of yesteryear, it can increase the risk of heart disease, Dr. Katz says.
Using sweet potatoes as your base ingredients serves a few purposes. First, it makes it so you don’t have to use a wheat or grain source as the main ingredient. Second, it provides plenty of antioxidants and vitamin support from the sweet potatoes, as well as additional fiber. You’ll still want to get a serving of vegetables in with your meal, as this doesn’t really cut it if you’re having a nice portion of meat with it. Think green leafy vegetables in a salad and you’ve got a nice balanced Paleo meal.
Richard Nikoley has the blog Free The Animal. He loves meat eating. His diet is near paleo, with the addition of some gray-area foods that he likes. These days most of his posts are on food. One recent trend in the paleo community is trying to optimize the proportions of the foods eaten. If you've read my definition you'll know that I simply define the diet as foods in and out. One of Richard's posts: Optimality: A Fool's Errand? has produced a long discussion of this trend.
The Stone Age Diet: Based on in-depth studies of human ecology and the diet of man by Walter L. Voegtlin. This was self-published back in 1975. Only a couple hundred copies were printed and distributed to friends and relatives. No one knew the book existed until some years later. In no way is he the father of the paleo diet. It is impossible to purchase. Apparently his descendents are planning a reprint, though the book is poorly written and not based upon factual anthropological information that even was available then. We have put up his Functional and Structural Comparison of Man's Digestive Tract with that of a Dog and Sheep. And a PDF can be found here.

The Primal Blueprint: Reprogram your genes for effortless weight loss, vibrant health, and boundless energy by Mark Sisson is a journey through human evolution, comparing the life and robust health of our hunter-gatherer ancestors with a day in the life of a modern family. The author offers a solution in 10 empowering Blueprint Lifestyle Laws: eat lots of plants and animals, avoid poisonous things, move frequently at a slow pace, lift heavy things, sprint once in a while, get adequate sleep, play, get adequate sunlight, avoid stupid mistakes, and use your brain. The reader learns how the right high-fat diet can actually help one lose weight and how popular low-fat, grain-based diets might trigger illness, disease, and lifelong weight gain. The author presents a comprehensive, well thought out paleo style eating plan in a humorous and organized manner. He backs up all his work with research, natural wisdom, and historical timelines. He disputes the role of dietary saturated fat in causation of arteriosclerosis, the role of cholesterol in promotion of heart disease, and the costly over-promotion of expensive, potentially toxic statin drugs. He criticizes our massive overeating of refined carbohydrates and urges avoidance of grains, cereals, bread and sugar. There is specific recommendation for "primal" food including more natural healthy fats and meats, fruits, veggies, and nuts. Some reviewers consider this to be the best of the various paleo books. The many Amazon reviews average to 5 stars. The author's popular and worthwhile web site: Mark's Daily Apple. The 2nd Edition was published January 14, 2012.


mix the wet ingredients beating til well mixed. combine and pur into a mug sprayed with pam or greased with coconut oil. bake in the microwave for 1-2 minutes til a toothpick comes out clean. This recipe is very similar to a one minute muffin but has salt, applesauce and coconut oil added for moistness. if you want it firmer, leave out the coconut oil since the apple sauce is meant to be a draw for you son. or cut back on the apple sauce. as created the recipe will be a moist muffin which can be sliced cross wise into rounds and topped with your choice of toppings. to make a sandwich you might have to make it firmer or cool it in the fridge to make the slices thinner. this recipe will also make about three 4 inch pancakes. if fried in coconut oil.
— HOW I WORK IT: I am 10 years into maintaining my 35 lb weight loss, and it continues to be a conscious effort. Right now the best way I am able to include Elana’s recipes into my post-weight-loss and weight-maintenance life is by following the gaps diet, which includes hearty soups as the basis for eating, filled in by some nut baked goods. Enjoy!
Following the paleo diet can be pricey. Inexpensive and healthy non-meat protein sources like soy and beans are off-limits, and a recent BMJ Open study shows that healthy meats like lean ground beef and boneless, skinless chicken breasts cost an average of 29 cents more per serving compared to less-healthy ones, such as high-fat ground beef and chicken drumsticks. Even switching from peanut butter to paleo-approved almond butter will cost you—it goes for up to $13 a jar.
I know there is some conflict between whether sweet potatoes are Paleo or not but, since I am a personal training and exercise daily, I still eat them. In the Paleo Bread recipe I substituted 1/2 cup of the almond flour with 1/2 cup of sweet potato flour. I also baked them in 1.5 x 3 inch mini loaf pans for 20 mins instead of 30mins. They turned out really great. Adds a little bit extra nutritional value.

This was my first attempt at GF baking…and it turned out okay as in it’s not burnt and definately edible. I think I had glass pan issues…and I didn’t realize you had to melt the coconut oil since the recipe didn’t specify in liquid form vs soft solid…but my main comments is that it’s just too eggy. Like French toast eggy. Definately not what I’m looking for as a GF bread option to eat in the morning WITH EGGS. On to the next recipe.
Hi, I just made these this morning. I substituted gelatin eggs for real eggs. I baked them on a cookie sheet—but next time I will put them on parchment paper because they did stick some. I also forgot the baking powder. I baked them for 20 mins. They were crunchy on the outside and gooey in the middle, but still delicious!! I also put them in the toaster after they came out of the oven. I would really love to come up with AIP recipe for these, because they are so darn good!! I probably could have gotten away with just one gelatin egg as well. I will have to experiment—-but if you come up with anything AIP in the future, please let us know! I love your blog!!
I just used a 9 x 5 pan and did not change the recipe proportions at all. Since this is the only loaf pan I have, instead, I pushed the dough against one side of the pan and formed a small loaf that is closer to the 7.5 x 3.5 pan size that Elana says to use. The dough was sticky enough to hold together fine and did not collapse or spread out during baking. It’s not the most beautiful creation, but it’s proportioned OK and tastes fine. I say – make it work with what you have and you’ll be alright.
The Soft Science of Dietary Fat is a summary of an article in Science Magazine reporting that mainstream nutritional science has demonized dietary fat, yet 50 years and hundreds of millions of dollars of research have failed to prove that eating a low-fat diet will help you live longer. In fact, there are good reasons to believe high-carbohydrate diets may be even worse than high-fat diets. Here is the text from the original article by Gary Taubes.
Whether you follow a paleo diet or not, these recipes are the perfect bites of indulgence for your sweet tooth. I included a mix of cookies, muffins and bars packed with better-for-you ingredients (and plenty of dark chocolate) that you can look forward to after a long day. Why? Because I think you should treat yo’ self every day – however that may be. For me it’s usually something topped with my favorite nut butter and/or a drizzle of chocolate, and for you it might be a fluffy slice of banana bread. Take a scroll, pick your favorite, and treat yourself to something delicious today!
I’ve made this in my bread machine several times, and it comes out beautifully. I double the recipe, choose the quick bread setting and it produces a nice 1 kilo loaf (2.2 pounds). I’m using a Kenwood model BM450 as I’m in the UK, but I think the same machine is marketed in the US by DeLonghi, if anyone wants to compare specifications. I just dump all the ingredients in the pan in order, and give a couple of stirs around the edges of the pan with a spatula while its on the mix cycle (though I’m not sure if its even necessary), and that’s it.
We Want to Live: The Primal Diet (2005 Expanded Edition) is a book by Aajonus Vonderplanitz. His basic philosophy is that (a) food is to be eaten in a live, raw condition; and (b) a diet rich in raw fats and raw meats from natural sources is essential to health. However his diet includes massive amounts of raw dairy. From the Planets is a book review by Ralph W. Moss. The Live-Food Mailing List discusses the concepts of this book.
I love this bread, and so do my German, bread-loving children! Hearty, rich German bread is the best in the world so that’s no small praise. I have a regular glass loaf pan, and adapt the recipe to make a full-size loaf. I add 1 extra egg (very large) and increase other ingredients 25%. Baking time is usually 5-10 minutes longer, although I reduce the temperature to 325 after it begins to brown to compensate for the glass pan. Topped with butter or pumpkin seed butter, this is my 3-year-old son’s favorite “treat” ever!
I’ve made the Paleo Almond Bread recipe twice now and it was delicous, but I was wondering how to make it rise more. I changed the 1-1/2 tsps. baking soda to 1 tsp. baking soda and 1/2 tsp. baking powder. Instead of adding the 5 eggs at once I added 4 plus the egg yolk of the fifth egg. I beat the leftover egg white until frothy and folded it in at the end. It worked for me! Turned out delicious!
These cookies are not only absolutely adorable, but with spicy seasonings like cloves, cinnamon, nutmeg, and ginger, they also scream, “It’s holiday season!” (Note: We fully support making these year-round while singing carols at the top of your lungs.) And don’t stress if you don’t have cookie cutters to make gingerbread people; just drop spoonfuls on the tray and bake.
Our family LOVES your paleo bread recipe (among others–like the muffins, cupcakes, cookies…) I’m wondering if have any plans to work on a Paleo Tortilla?? Mark’s Daily Apple posted one–I’ve made it a couple of times–changing the recipe a bit–but have not figured out a way to keep the tortilla from falling apart once you fill it. Any suggestions or tips would be GREATLY appreciated.
For those who were considering ordering Paleo bread from the Julian Bakery online, just a word of caution: beware! The bad reviews are really true, and I’m not one who usually does any online reviews. I have ordered both the almond and the coconut breads for awhile. I am not sure what to make of the taste of them, but the almond is definitely a no-go for me. The coconut was palatable, if you chug down some liquid with it and pretend you’re not about to choke! It’s gagging, tasteless, and soggy-at-times bread, but I guess I was desperate for a slice, truly desperate to think it was edible.
The Soft Science of Dietary Fat is a summary of an article in Science Magazine reporting that mainstream nutritional science has demonized dietary fat, yet 50 years and hundreds of millions of dollars of research have failed to prove that eating a low-fat diet will help you live longer. In fact, there are good reasons to believe high-carbohydrate diets may be even worse than high-fat diets. Here is the text from the original article by Gary Taubes.
Hi V. Not all my recipes need nuts or almond flour, but most my baked goods do. This is because almond flour gives the best texture. If your son is allergic to nuts I would suggest substituting the nuts for seeds, and the almond flour for pumpkin or sunflower seed flour. You can also try using a gluten-free oats flours. I haven’t made this substitution in many of my recipes, but it’s worth a try. Please let me know how it goes.
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