The line of VivoBarefoot shoes have a design based on the simple principle that being barefoot is the healthiest way for you and your feet to be. An ultra thin (3mm) puncture resistant sole allows your feet to be as millions of years of evolutionary design intended Barefoot! There are many styles with each in many colors. Plus many more styles that are not available through Amazon.com. Many of them are conventionally styled and can be worn to work. For the current models see Amazon.com. One style is discussed below.

Is there any place to get organic almond flour–and please don’t talk about Bob’s Red Mills. Most of their products are NOT organic and that includes their almond flour. I am pretty disciplined about not using chemically grown food. Also, since most American almonds come from California there is the added concern about whether they are watered with waste water from oil companies.
Eat WELL Feel GOOD: Practical Paleo Living by Diane Frampton has over 200 recipes that makes paleo eating simple, delicious, and ultimately, intuitive. So they claim. There are only a few reviews at Amazon. They all like the book, but their lack of details makes it appear that they are not truly independent reviews. The recipes have a Crossfit appeal to them. Chef Rachel Albert has made some of the recipes and posted here [archive.org].
Hi Michelle, some people left comments above and they made it with coconut oil and also flax as an egg replacer. They said these work well, but personally I haven’t tried it. If your daughter can have the yolk , you can separate it and just use that to make the bread. Also find out if she can have ghee because although it’s made from butter, it doesn’t contain the casein that most people react to in dairy.
I made this bread twice. The first time I followed your recipe exactly, but it came out dry and sort of tasteless. I think it’s because of my elevation and how dry the climate is here, so I added about a 1/4 c maple syrup the second time I made it and it’s perfect! I really like this recipe, and I hope others at high and dry climates don’t give up on it if they have the same problem.

Thank you for taking care of us who need your recipes! I recently found out that tapioca comes from the cassava plant and that is where they get cyanide from, so I know longer eat it and found out that I was allergic to it. If its not refined enough, it is a problem for many people who eat it and don’t know why they don’t feel good. You might want to consider not using it or xanthan gum or guar gum in any of your recipes either. They come from Pakistan and India and cause stomach distress in many people as they are a bean. Guar gum is used in oil fracking so it’s really not a great ingredient to be putting into food either!
I’m not a believer in vegan or Paleo diets. I believe in a healthy diet that leans somewhat in the vegetarian direction and I just became convinced of the need to eliminate wheat from my diet. I applaud this website and the author for providing me with the bread alternatives I was looking for. I also appreciated the open eclectic attitude of the author in including some items recommended by vegans. Still, I believe red meat should be avoided . Thank You.
Carol: For anyone gluten intolerant, or worse, that’s a given. What quickly becomes apparent to anyone providing for this aspect of diet and reads labels, is that commercially available i.e. highly processed versions of bread etc are ridiculously loaded with poor quality fats, sugars and yet other refined flours etc to ‘compensate’ for wheat comfort. No, gluten free food, as in what is usually available to mimic where flour is widely used ‘n’ enjoyed in bought ready-to-eat products, is far from healthy…. why we’re here!
Thank you Elana for posting such a delishious bread recipe. I followed the recipe as originally posted, but I didn’t feel there was enough batter, so I made another batch and added it to the first. The only change was I added aprox. 1 tsp. of cream of tartar. I used unpasturized dark honey, but next time I will only use 1 TBS. instead of the 2 for when I double the recipe. I think 1 TBS. will be plenty enough. I also baked the loaf a little longer until it was browned because of it’s thickness. Out of the grain free breads I have experimented with in baking, this one is definately the best. The taste and texture completed my ham and cucumber sandwich.
I made this but didn’t have baking powder, so I subbed a little baking soda and greek yogurt instead. I also added some italian herb blend. I froze it overnight to take to camp. Now it’s perfect for a lunch or snack. I’m topping a slice with a little goat chesee, fresh basil, couple pieces of spring mix and a few cherry tomatoes on the side! It’s delicious!

I just stumbled upon your website today..perfect timing! I have been struggling with my first month of switching to the Paleo lifestyle. I love to cook, love to eat, and hate being restricted. Even though I very rarely crave pasta, grains, or dairy I was going a bit nutty because I’m now “not allowed” to have them. Your website has been a blessing. Already today I have made the silver dollar pancakes for breakfast, the Paleo bread for the rest of the week and have so many other recipes I can’t wait to try!
[…] I don't like the word "diet", so I'll say that this is more a way of changing what you eat long-term. It's all based around what our ancestor hunter-gatherers would have eaten, and what we've evolved to be able to process and absorb. The very basic level of it, is that you don't eat carbohydrates, processed meats or sugars, and cut out dairy products. You instead eat plenty of fresh meat, fish, vegetables, fruits and nuts. You can still have oil, provided it's natural – so coconut, peanut & olive oil are all good. The good thing is that you're also allowed to take this to your own level – so if you want a couple of days off a week – say, weekends, you can do it & it will still be a lot healthier for you. This is a really helpful site I've used to make a note on my shopping list of what's allowed: The Ultimate Paleo Diet Food List | Ultimate Paleo Guide […]
Alina Bradford is a contributing writer for Live Science. Over the past 16 years, Alina has covered everything from Ebola to androids while writing health, science and tech articles for major publications. She has multiple health, safety and lifesaving certifications from Oklahoma State University. Alina's goal in life is to try as many experiences as possible. To date, she has been a volunteer firefighter, a dispatcher, substitute teacher, artist, janitor, children's book author, pizza maker, event coordinator and much more.

Jan Engvald has studied food and health thoroughly in the literature. In Unexpected facts on... food he shows that today's health advice (more or less unchanged for more than 30 years) is a direct cause to the increase in national diseases like coronary heart disease, stroke, cancer, obesity, adult-onset diabetes, allergy, eye diseases, etc. His findings are low-carb and high-fat, close to paleo, though he allows high fat dairy.


Evolution of the Human Diet: The Known, the Unknown, and the Unknowable by Peter S. Ungar. Diet is key to understanding the ecology and evolution of our distant ancestors and their kin, the early hominins. A study of the range of foods eaten by our progenitors underscores just how unhealthy many of our diets are today. This volume brings together authorities from disparate fields to offer new insights into the diets of our ancestors. Paleontologists, archaeologists, primatologists, nutritionists and other researchers all contribute pieces to the puzzle. The book has four sections: Reconstructed diets based on hominin fossils--tooth size, shape, structure, wear, and chemistry, mandibular biomechanics. Archaeological evidence of subsistence--stone tools and modified bones. Models of early hominin diets based on the diets of living primates--both human and non-human, paleoecology, and energetics. Nutritional analyses and their implications for evolutionary medicine.
I’ve been following your blog for a long time, I eat since seven years organic and gluten free (brown rice, millet, buckwheat). I have fibromyalgia and have no sugar, cereals and milk. For a year, I do still suffer from a fungus in my gut, so I want to try the paleo diet, so no more grain! I have some of your recepies tried and what are they delicious, never thought that the bread would be so nice! Even better than brown rice and buckwheat! My English is not so good, but wanted to let you know that I love your recipes and I occasionally make a link on my blog for you!
Hi Adriana, thank you for this recipe. My youngest son has to eat gluten free and I’m trying to find a recipe for bread that he really likes (none so far). It’s just in the oven and I hope it turns out okay, because the batter wasn’t a batter, it was more of a dough… I followed your recipe to the letter: same ingredients, no overmixing… Do you have any idea what could have happened?
Christina, I haven’t tried with cassava flour in this recipe, and it’s actually one flour I haven’t worked much with, so I’m not sure if it would yield a similar result without making other adjustments to the recipe (for example, certain flours absorb liquid differently). If you decide to experiment with the recipe using cassava flour, please let me know how it turns out!
Hey Adriana! I did it! Came out beautifully. Much better than the paleo bread that you can purchase at Julian Bakery online. It is flavorful and light. What i did was the egg white trick from an earlier post. I used Honeyville products only. I also did 2/3 cups of coconut flour and 3/4 cup of almond flour. I was hoping for a little bit more of a rise, but I’ll mess with it again next time. Thank you for your expertise! All the best! Gabriel
I’m new to the whole GF thing – I don’t have a physical need/condition for eating grain free, but the whole concept of this healthy way of eating intrigues me, so I’m just “testing the waters.” It is very generous that Elana shares her recipes for free so that I can give it a try before jumping in with both feet – and when/if I do, I’ll be buying her recipe books. Great blog.
There were some recipes I tried that were decent enough and definitely passable as bread-like concoctions, but nothing was stellar. Or even good enough to warrant making a second time (IMHO). And there were also a few loaves that were actually pretty bad in different ways – either the flavor and/or the texture was just off – that ended up only being fit for the garbage (definitely a sad thing). But that’s how we learn, right?

NeanderThin: Eat Like a Caveman to Achieve a Lean, Strong, Healthy Body (Hardcover) by Ray Audette, with Troy Gilchrist, was one of the early paleo diet authors. His home page NeanderThin [now restored from archive.org] has a diet based on the ideas of paleolithic nutrition. The diet can be followed as a low-carb, moderate or high carb diet, depending upon whether and how much fruit is used. You can read up through page 19 of the book at Google Books. The original press release from 1999. [The webmaster has an extra copy with the author's signature for sale. It has the original lime-purple cover. Pristine new condition. $60 (shipping included). Paypal only. Use e-mail link at page bottom.]
For the dry bits, I would use a flour sifter or a sieve depending on what you have in the kitchen. Adding in the wet would require a spoon. The food processor simply takes out the labor of mixing it by hand. I haven’t made this one yet (tomorrow I will) but I’ve made banana bread more times than I can remember and only once has it been done in a food processor.
Have to laugh with me — I mixed it all up in my cuisinart, popped it in the perfect sized, non stick bread pan and put it in the oven for 5 minutes before I realized I’d forgotten the Apple Cider Vinegar! (Which helps the baking soda do its work, right?) I grabbed it out, poured the vinegar on top and stirred it up and shoved it back in. It came out fine, believe it or not! I’m having earth balance margarine on it, with some honey, Yum.
A decade ago, when I was on the low-fat craze, I’d make fluffy cakes using no butter/fat, replacing it with apple sauce, which gives moisture and a soft texture. These days, I’m a low-carb girl, but a 1/4 cup of apple sauce divided by 4 = only 1 tablespoon (per roll/per 2nd day). I’m okay with that, especially because I substitute half the tapioca flour (high-carb) for whey protein powder to cut a few carbs that way. 🙂

The Paleo diet is promoted as a way of improving health.[2] There is some evidence that following this diet may lead to improvements in terms of body composition and metabolic effects compared with the typical Western diet[6] or compared with diets recommended by national nutritional guidelines.[9] There is no good evidence, however, that the diet helps with weight loss, other than through the normal mechanisms of calorie restriction.[10] Following the Paleo diet can lead to an inadequate calcium intake, and side effects can include weakness, diarrhea, and headaches.[3][10]


This is such an excellent versatile recipe and definitely my favorite gluten-free bread recipe. I find that I’m perfectly satisfied using almond meal that of almond flour. And it has adapted well to any other kind of nut or seed meal I have tried so far. Last week I used all pecan meal is my favorite today taste wise. I also often mix half of another nut meal with half almond meal. Second favorite was half almond meal with half sunflower seed meal the taste was delicious. However the sunflower seed meal did turn green like I did read. . . Morning I may Kallof with all walnut meal and I’m sure it will turn out cause of all the work you did in creating this recipe. Also I never use a food processor I mix it all by hand and it still turns out.
Advocates of the diet argue that the increase in diseases of affluence after the dawn of agriculture was caused by changes in diet, but others have countered that it may be that pre-agricultural hunter-gatherers did not suffer from the diseases of affluence because they did not live long enough to develop them.[30] Based on the data from hunter-gatherer populations still in existence, it is estimated that at age 15, life expectancy was an additional 39 years, for a total age of 54.[31] At age 45, it is estimated that average life expectancy was an additional 19 years, for a total age of 64 years.[32][33] That is to say, in such societies, most deaths occurred in childhood or young adulthood; thus, the population of elderly – and the prevalence of diseases of affluence – was much reduced. Excessive food energy intake relative to energy expended, rather than the consumption of specific foods, is more likely to underlie the diseases of affluence. "The health concerns of the industrial world, where calorie-packed foods are readily available, stem not from deviations from a specific diet but from an imbalance between the energy humans consume and the energy humans spend."[34]
Thank you so much for this! I have always LOVED bread and made my own before going Paleo earlier this year. Now my husband asked me to bake him Zucchini Blueberry Bread, my absolute favorite, more of a cake than bread. I knew it would be irresistible for me. The day I made his bread, I found your post (again). You said we could add fruit, so I added shredded zucchini and blueberries. AWSOME! Although it appeared to be done after 90 secs., there was a raw section inside. I put it all on a plate and microwaved a bit longer. What a great make over for an old-time favorite. Thanks again.
This bread is, hands down, THE best GF/paleo bread I have ever had or made in my life. It is so simple, so easy, so perfect, and so delicious that I haven’t been able to stop staring at it, mouth agape. (Quite convenient since that makes it easier for me to continuously eat it.) With Kerry butter it is simply divine. I will never want for another quick/soda bread recipe ever again.
The following links tend towards news reports of scientific studies that point out some positive aspect of the paleo diet. If you are looking for current news reports, I suggest signing up for Google Alerts for the Type: News. I have three set up, for: "caveman diet," "paleo diet," and "paleolithic diet." You can also set them up for blogs and/or websites.
Hi, I just made these this morning. I substituted gelatin eggs for real eggs. I baked them on a cookie sheet—but next time I will put them on parchment paper because they did stick some. I also forgot the baking powder. I baked them for 20 mins. They were crunchy on the outside and gooey in the middle, but still delicious!! I also put them in the toaster after they came out of the oven. I would really love to come up with AIP recipe for these, because they are so darn good!! I probably could have gotten away with just one gelatin egg as well. I will have to experiment—-but if you come up with anything AIP in the future, please let us know! I love your blog!!
When I tried this yesterday, it didn’t bake all the way, specifically most of the center was still raw. So after eating what was edible and tossing the rest (how do you do that btw, I always feel so bad throwing away the unfavorable outcomes…) I tweaked it as follows, went back today and now it’s great! I substituted 1 tsp baking powder and 1/2 tsp baking soda for the baking soda and baked it in the preheated oven at 325° for about 55 min. Thanks Elana for your hard work! Keep it up, it’s highly appreciated!
I love this recipe! This last time I made it, I split the dough into 6 rounds and baked it in my bun pan, making 6 “hamburger buns”. I like this size better than the loaf slices because I can get a more substantial sandwich. It held up great to a BBQ chicken sandwich as well as a simple almond butter and jelly sandwich… I think this will be my preferred way of baking the bread. Thanks for such a great recipe, Elana, I love it!
Protein is a staple of the caveman diet- specifically options that are grass-fed, wild caught or organic, as these options are often from animals raised in environments that encourage natural behavior. And because our ancestors didn't just live off chicken and beef, they hunted a wide variety of meat, the more variety you can add to your proteins, the better!
Thank you for another amazing recipe, Elana! I am thrilled to find delicious recipes that support a healthy lifestyle, and that I can share with family and friends. Your cookbooks are a staple in our house and your blog is a gift to me. I am looking forward to trying some of your great breakfast ideas to start to school year off right. Thanks for sharing the fruit of your efforts. :)

^ Hall H (2014). "Food myths: what science knows (and does not know) about diet and nutrition". Skeptic. 19 (4). p. 10. Fad diets and "miracle" diet supplements promise to help us lose weight effortlessly. Different diet gurus offer a bewildering array of diets that promise to keep us healthy and make us live longer: vegan, Paleo, Mediterranean, low fat, low carb, raw food, gluten-free ... the list goes on. (subscription required)
Trick And Treat - how 'healthy eating' is making us ill by Barry Groves. The author is one of the world's most outspoken proponents of a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet. This book is an account of how and why the health-care establishment has got the concept of 'healthy eating' so wrong. Whereas Taubes work (see above) is a fairly straight forward review of the existing science, Groves expands into the politics of medical research and treatment to a much greater extent. "Trick and Treat" is divided into two parts. Part One describes the corruption in the health industry, points out the problems inherent in a high-carb, low-fat diet, and then prescribes a diet that leads to good health. The prescribed diet is high in fat - specifically animal fat, not polyunsaturated vegetable fat - and low in carbohydrates, with 60-70% of calories from fat, 15-25% of calories from protein, and a mere 10-15% of calories from carbohydrates. Part Two describes numerous diseases the author claims are the result of high carbohydrate consumption. These range from life-threatening disorders such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer to less serious problems such as acne, near-sightedness and dental problems. The Amazon reviews average to 4+ stars.
Thank you thank you thank you! 🙂 My kids and my husband do paleo but they do miss sandwiches on occasion and I hate buying gluten free bread. Never tastes right, has weird texture, very expensive, and they still have funky ingredients! I’m always on the hunt for good paleo bread recipes and have found few but I’m always excited when I see one that looks to be very promising! Will be trying this tonight for lunches this week.
Hi Keith, hope I can help a little. Coconut flour is very dry and absorbs a LOT of moisture so it is most difficult to replace in recipes. I have had success increasing other flours and/or reducing liquid. Coconut oil can be replaced with ghee or olive oil, but the taste will change a bit. I use date sugar or honey (again, adjust liquid) in some recipes. It might just be easier for you to do a web search for coconut-free recipes!
Hi I’m just trying this recipe for the first time. I’m currently proving my dough, but was a little confused at one point in the instructions. As I’m not much of a baker I really wasn’t sure what to do, after mixing the wet ingredients with an electric mixer. Was I meant to continue to put flour and sour cream in with the electric mixer, or switch to manual mixing? Or should I have used a dough hook? That seems to be a gap in the instructions, perhaps assuming that the reader will know what to do, but I really didn’t!
Mine came out perfect following the directions exactly (and for the first time, one of my recipes looks exactly like the picture!). I was having problems baking gluten free foods in my new house, I had to extend cooking times and then they were unevenly cooked often. I finally had the temperature checked on my oven and it turns out my temp was running quite a bit lower, the repairman said it was a common issue. Once adjusted my GF recipes are coming out perfect. (It seems gluten free baked goods are a little more tempermental.) Just a thought, the trouble may be your oven.
Thank you for so much for experimenting until you developed this delicious recipe! We (me, husband, 12yo daughter, 10yo son) just finished Paleo restart, 30 days. My son has been so desperate to have bread, now he can have nut butter & homemade jelly sandwiches! He’s ecstatic…me too! ???? ???? ???? Thanks for sharing…it’s because of people like you that are making this journey not so overwhelming!
For many years Arthur De Vany Ph.D. has been writing a book called Evolutionary Fitness on "What Evolution Teaches Us About How to Live and Stay Healthy." The diet he follows fits into my core diet definition. He may have been the first one to use the paleo diet to maximize fitness. His current site is Art's Blog on Fitness, Health, Aging, Nutrition and Exercise [archive.org].
Hi, I just made this bread for the first time & my fiancé & I absolutely LOVE it! I did not use the flour you recommended my first time around as I am knew to “gluten free” & just picked a bag of almond flower off the shelf without realizing the specifics but I still loved it & will try the blanched almond flower next time around! I have been a bread lover my whole life so trying to implement the Paleo, Gluten free life style is a bit challenging for me! I must say you “saved” the day today! I do want to say that the bread came out closer to a more corn bread type then a traditional sandwich bread consistency. Do you have any tips I can use to make it as close to a traditional white bread for sandwiches? I would love to hear from you as I am a complete novace at this lol…thanks again! I’m so glad I found your sight so early in the game for me 🙂
I am so addicted to this bread I’ve gone through several loaves since i discovered the recipe a couple of weeks ago. Even got the approval from my boyfriend who eats everything, and I’m not sure he knew how healthy it was. I experimented with using Chia Seed instead of flax because I had some soaking that needed to be used. Follow the recipe the but instead of flax liquefy about 1/4 cup chia seeds (soaked, they doubled in volume) in vitamix and add them to the food processor at the end, it will seem like a lot because they fluff up in the vitamix. Loaf turned out so delicious and moist, with no tunnel action like i had in my previous loaves. Chia has a slightly bitter taste in comparison to nutty flax seeds, so if you don’t like the bitterness you can add more sweetener.
I know that soy can cause inflammation and if you are not using soy free eggs, that could be part of the cause. It may not be the actual egg but the soy that is the problem. just a thought. Here is an article that has some interesting info on soy. http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/07/29/soy-effects-on-women.aspx?e_cid=20120729_SNL_Art_1
Hahaha. That’s why we’re besties. We staunchly refuse to follow the times. ???? Now what’s this all about floral curtains? Do you have a set picked out for me? Lolol. I’ve never tried Justin’s vanilla AB. But now I’m super intrigued! Yes on the overheating–AB takes a lot longer than you would think. I will label at least 100 of these cookies for you. 😉 Love ya more! <3 <3

Lexi! I just made this recipe for the first time yesterday to eat alongside our burgers – and they were PERFECT. Great consistency, nice flavor and best of all – the rolls retained their shape and didn’t rip like most buns do while eating the burgers. My husband loved them! We plan on making these on the regular. Thanks so much for creating/sharing this!
Paleo baked goods are free of gluten, refined sugars, and dairy. If you’ve perfected regular baking and now you’ve gone paleo, you might be surprised at just how different this way of baking is. I find that in order to get the closest simulation of regular bread (i.e., bread that has gluten), it’s often useful to use a combination of a few different paleo-friendly flours.
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