New here, but loving your recipees so far (totally game changer for my diet and life)! I’ve tried this bread a few times now, but am struggling with it a little bit and was hoping that you could help me try to figure out what to try next. The taste is fantastic, but I’m having trouble with the rise. My yeast is bubbling and I’ve had it proving on my oven (which is pretty hot! –too hot?). The structure inside looks like there were air bubbles, but they got knocked out or something (sort of squished), but your picture looks incredible so I’m hoping that I can change something. The taste seems a little dense and chewy so far. I’m very new to baking, so it might also be a bake problem. I’m in Chicago.
Thanks for reading this post. Of these recipes, pick one that sounds good to, and try it. These are all good recipes and fairly easy to make, I like to make the Cheesy Tapioca Flatbread, as its pretty quick and tastes great. I’ve got lots of paleo resources and recipes on here, so click around to find out more about paleo. Keep me posted on how things go and always feel free to share a story or ask a question.
This looks awesome! Just wanted to say thank you. I’m a bomber cook, but when it comes to baking, I’m so grateful people like you are willing to play around in the kitchen and make all the mistakes for me. :) Also, I made your chocolate cream pie from your cookbook for a party and I swear, no one ever knows your desserts are GF and Primal-friendly. It’s gotten to where I always bring dessert so I know I can enjoy something, but then everyone ends up eating it too!
Finally found the recommended loaf size and could hardly wait to make this paleo bread. After 45 minutes and the toothpick coming out clean, removed it from the oven. After it cooled, cut it to serve and had two inches on either end and about a half an inch on the top and bottom that were edible. The middle consisted of what I would call an empty tunnel about the size of a silver dollar and surrounded by uncooked batter. Yuck. What’s so interesting is I made your Scrumptious Sandwich bread out of your book, and it turned out perfectly. I’ve been baking a LONG time, and I can’t even speculate as to what happened to this loaf. Did I have a massive air bubble in the middle, and, if so, why? Did using the food processor affect it? Any light you can shed on this will be greatly appreciated. I’ve been experimenting with the recipes in this cookbook and loving it. Please help me understand what happened to this paleo bread.
Paleo bread fantastic, I truly believe this is the best I’ve ever made, I used Tupelo honey and Braggs raw unfiltered vinegar and it really masked the over egginess that sometimes comes with paleo bread, it toasted up great, thanks for all your hard work you give such great alternatives for a grain free diet, love the date nut bar it’s always a hit at work.
This is the best grain-free bread recipe I have ever tried. I didn’t have the loaf pan so I used one of my small casserole dishes and it came out square and a little darker around the edges. I used 1 1/2oz. of coconut oil and mixed it with 1/2oz. of melted butter and it came out really moist. It also came out dark like whole wheat bread, so I am assuming that I used just a little too much flax meal. I love you for taking the time to perfect this!!! I’m thinking of making a spice bread next time. Let you know if it works!!
I’ve been following a gluten-free diet for two years now. I don’t adhere to a strictly Paleo diet but I use a lot of Paleo recipes I find on Pinterest. This is the first time I’ve ever left a comment or feedback. After enduring many labor-intensive, gluten-free and Paleo bread recipes, I have found my go-to! This is SO simple with a WONDERFUL taste and texture! I don’t keep flax on hand so I use sweet sorghum flour (I realize that’s not Paleo but it works for me.) I also add a packet of quick rise yeast simply because I like yeast flavor. I turn my oven on the lowest temp and set the batter on top of the stove for an hour and it does rise nicely. There’s no need to wait if you’re not looking for it to rise. The hands on time is just as the recipe indicates-minutes! I also just realized that the Paleo casserole dish I had intended to make for dinner tonight (and have already made several times) is from the same source and is DELICIOUS and healthy, comfort food! Thank you Kaylie for the simple, fantastic recipes!
Hi Sara! Hmmm, I’m not sure- I haven’t tried anything else. I don’t think there would be a good sub for almond flour. I do have another sandwich bread recipe that is nut free and paleo- it’s in my ebook. It only takes 1/2 cup cassava flour! You can find it here if you are interested. https://paleoglutenfree.com/shop/quick-easy-paleo-breads/ Sorry I don’t have a good sub for the almond!
Worried, before I made this recipe I calculated the calories. Because just because something is healthy doesn’t mean you can eat as much as you want! I have an 8×4 inch loaf pan that it is baking in. 1/2 inch slices for an 8 inch pan are 134 calories per slice. Can’t wait to taste it when it’s done. I hope those slices are filling because I have a feeling they will be small.

This recipe is so simple but so tasty. I use almond flour I grind myself (use a coffee grinder–it’s so much cheaper than buying bags of almond flour at the grocery store or online). The first loaf I made as stated and felt it was a little too much on the coconut. The second loaf I exchanged the coconut oil for bacon grease, which worked well but was a little too strong on the bacon. The third loaf I used half coconut oil and half bacon grease and I really love the taste. A little smear of almond butter and a dollop of jam really makes this a great Paleo breakfast!

Some randomized controlled trials have shown the Paleo diet to produce greater short-term benefits than diets based on national nutrition guidelines, including greater weight loss, reduced waist circumference, decreased blood pressure, increased insulin sensitivity, and improved cholesterol. However these studies were of short duration (6 months or less) with a small number of participants (less than 40). [4-6]


Drop Grok into the Hiwi's midst—or indeed among any modern or ancient hunter–gather society—and he would be a complete aberration. Grok cannot teach us how to live or eat; he never existed. Living off the land or restricting oneself to foods available before agriculture and industry does not guarantee good health. The human body is not simply a collection of adaptations to life in the Paleolithic—its legacy is far greater. Each of us is a dynamic assemblage of inherited traits that have been tweaked, transformed, lost and regained since the beginning of life itself. Such changes have not ceased in the past 10,000 years.


Hi, Elana. Just wanted to let you know that I love this bread recipe. I make it all the time. Not long ago, I had an epic fail because I forgot to let my ingredients come to room temperature. I had quite an issue with tunneling. The bread was unusable for slicing, but I decided to cube it and dry it in the oven so I’d have some gluten-free bread for stuffing. I used it to convert my treasured cornbread stuffing recipe to a gluten-free version, and it turned out great. My recipe will be featured on my blog(www.gardenforestfield.com), with a link to your bread recipe, on Monday, Nov. 18th. Thanks for all you do.
Just made this, thank you for the recipe! My loaf pans were too wide so I used 6 Texas size muffin tins and they came out great. I used maple syrup instead of honey because, well, I live in Vermont and my husband sugars. I am fairly new to Paleo and I’ve been an avid baker for decades-I miss baking! I will experiment with this recipe for sure, using it as a base. The first thing I am imagining is lemon poppy seed and baking them in mini muffin tins. Or baking in a cast iron skillet in the oven like corn bread. And maybe a morning glory version. Oooh my world just opened up.
Jazzmin, you are correct and the active cultures in the yogurt will not survive during baking. However, the reason why I mentioned those facts about yogurt on my post is because a lot of people following a paleo diet simply won’t eat dairy because at one point dairy was classified as “not paleo”. There are so many amazing health benefits from eating fermented foods and raw, organic dairy from pasture raised animals that I feel it is important to educate people.

My loaf came out beautifully, just like a regular loaf. The toothpick came out clean – twice! – but when I got past the third slice, the middle was hollow and the edges of the hollow area was raw.I cut it out and ate the rest, but I’m puzzled why the toothpick came out dry when it wasn’t cooked through. It is, however, the best gf bread I’ve ever had, and I will make it again. I did have to convert the temperature to Celsius, and I have a fan oven, so I will check that out.


While I haven’t made this recipe, I’ve used flaxmeal in a lot of muffin recipes, and on a occasion I’ve noticed those same gossamer-type strings after a few days. My best guess is it has something to do with flax, although I’m not sure what causes them to develop. Some recipes I use flaxmeal in never develop the strings, and some do, but it definitely only happens in breads where I use flaxmeal. I think the food is still safe to eat though! I wish I knew exactly what causes it too…

Argh! I’ve literally made 4 different recipes today for yeast free/gluten free breads, and every last one has been a fail. This one is in the oven as I write (please let it be good!). I had to sub a flour because hubby can’t have almond products so I will keep that in mind if it’s not perfect, but seems to at least have potential. I also only had duck eggs, which are large, so used 3 instead of 4 (can’t have chicken eggs either). I will let you know how it turned out! Thanks for the recipe!
A 2015 study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology found that 76 people who followed the Paleo diet for 60 days (as well as those who followed vegan, Mediterranean and DASH plans for the same length of time) lost an average of 9 pounds and showed improvement in their blood pressure levels. The effects were greatest and most sustained among people who also attended regular diet support group meetings.
^ Ramsden, C.; Faurot, K.; Carrera-Bastos, P.; Cordain, L.; De Lorgeril, M.; Sperling, L. (2009). "Dietary Fat Quality and Coronary Heart Disease Prevention: A Unified Theory Based on Evolutionary, Historical, Global, and Modern Perspectives". Current Treatment Options in Cardiovascular Medicine. 11 (4): 289–301. doi:10.1007/s11936-009-0030-8. PMID 19627662.
Scott, Thanks so much for trying the bread, I’m sorry to hear the inside isn’t fully cooked for you. I wouldn’t cover the loaf while cooking, I would just leave the loaf in longer until fully cooked. Was the middle still uncooked, but the outside starting to burn? If that’s the case you might want to have your oven calibrated to make sure it’s accurate. Another thing you could try is reducing the temperature slightly (maybe by 25 degrees) and letting the loaf finish cooking at a lower temp so the outside doesn’t get too dark. I hope this helps!
Cheryl, We use beef gelatin in this recipe to act as a binder and add a bit more chewiness to help simulate regular bread. (If you’re interested, we talk more about using beef gelatin in keto baking in this post: https://theketoqueens.com/crispy-low-carb-indian-flatbread-recipe/.) We haven’t experimented with this recipe to omit the beef gelatin, but you might be able to get a similar result using a bit more psyllium husk powder, flaxseed meal, ground chia seeds, xanthan gum, or guar gum. If you decide to play around with the recipe, please let us know how it goes!
×