Thank you so much for this recipe. I’ve made this recipe and your simple bread recipe and both came out perfect right from the start. I did follow the recipes EXACTLY, except for the fact that I don’t have a food processor so I had to “pulse” by hand which led me to believe that I had to stir in ingredients in large minimal swoops being careful not to over mix. Wondering if that is what other people had done when they’ve made this recipe without a food processor? As I said, it came out perfectly. just wondering if I was just lucky.
Several examples of recent and relatively speedy human evolution underscore that our anatomy and genetics have not been set in stone since the stone age. Within a span of 7,000 years, for instance, people adapted to eating dairy by developing lactose tolerance. Usually, the gene encoding an enzyme named lactase—which breaks down lactose sugars in milk—shuts down after infancy; when dairy became prevalent, many people evolved a mutation that kept the gene turned on throughout life. Likewise, the genetic mutation responsible for blue eyes likely arose between 6,000 and 10,000 years ago. And in regions where malaria is common, natural selection has modified people's immune systems and red blood cells in ways that help them resist the mosquito-borne disease; some of these genetic mutations appeared within the last 10,000 or even 5,000 years. The organisms with which we share our bodies have evolved even faster, particularly the billions of bacteria living in our intestines. Our gut bacteria interact with our food in many ways, helping us break down tough plant fibers, but also competing for calories. We do not have direct evidence of which bacterial species thrived in Paleolithic intestines, but we can be sure that their microbial communities do not exactly match our own.

On Wednesday, April 26, 2017 my daughter and I drove to Julian Bakery in Oceanside. It is in a business park and easy to locate. They have a small storefront bakery where they have a few items out to purchase, the bread is actually in the back, and I assume so is most of their other items. They bake on Monday and Tuesday, which is why I chose to go on Wednesday. I wanted freshly made bread and all the bread at the other stores must be kept in the freezer because they are moist and would spoil too quickly otherwise. March 24 I was diagnosed with stage three breast cancer and found out from David Getoff’s website that Paleo bread was the only bread that he would recommend if you HAD to have bread. There are no grains used in Paleo bread and they use Stevia if a sweetener is needed. The bread is more like a banana nut or zucchini bread, moist. It does well in the toaster, but I like the moistness of the bread and sometimes it in plain. (Grains, including all rice, potatoes, etc. turn rapidly into sugar which is BAD for people with cancer. Cancer cells have 9500 receptor sites, while normal cells only have four. Sugar keeps the body in an acid state, which is how cancer can expand so rapidly. ALL microwaved foods turn acidic. Anything fried has a pH level of 4 and below (BAD). Cancer LOVES sugar and fat. So my diet has changed. You can store the bread in the frig for up to 4 weeks. It freezes for about twelve months. The bread is organic and non-gmo. I have been eating mostly organic for quite awhile now and now that I REALLY need to change my diet . . . I will be coming to the Julian Bakery MUCH more in the future!! Elizabeth is a wonderful help, very informative! (She is NOT the person that you speak to on the phone – that person is in another building, in customer service.) This is a little out of the way for me (35 minute drive) but well worth it!! Thank you Julian Bakery!! They also have things for Pegan and something else, but I did not really pay attention because I have to go Paleo . . . 🙂
Nourishing Traditions: The Cookbook that Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and the Diet Dictocrat by Mary G. Enig, Ph.D. and Sally Fallon. The premise is the culinary traditions of our ancestors, and the food choices and preparation techniques of healthy nonindustrialized peoples, should serve as the model for contemporary eating habits. However, they push whole grains and dairy, which aren't Paleolithic.
I just found this recipe and I notice that the recipes are very similar: this one has the addition of a little coconut flour, half the salt and half the vinegar, but maintains the baking soda quantity. How does the the texture of this bread compare to your low carb corn bread? I’m very curious about what went into the decisions that differentiate the two breads.
I love this bread!!! Because of this bread, I can eat a sandwich now and then and not be in pain from gluten and additives. I’ve also made it into French toast and it came out great. Dairy is a problem food for me, so I substitute the butter for coconut oil and use coconut cream in place of yogurt. I freeze this bread in half loaves so I always have some on hand. Delicious!!
This bread is, hands down, THE best GF/paleo bread I have ever had or made in my life. It is so simple, so easy, so perfect, and so delicious that I haven’t been able to stop staring at it, mouth agape. (Quite convenient since that makes it easier for me to continuously eat it.) With Kerry butter it is simply divine. I will never want for another quick/soda bread recipe ever again.
Five roots, both bitter and sweet, are staples in the Hiwi diet, as are palm nuts and palm hearts, several different fruits, a wild legume named Campsiandra comosa, and honey produced by several bee species and sometimes by wasps. A few Hiwi families tend small, scattered and largely unproductive fields of plantains, corn and squash. At neighboring cattle ranches in a town about 30 kilometers away, some Hiwi buy rice, noodles, corn flour and sugar. Anthropologists and tourists have also given the Hiwi similar processed foods as gifts (see illustration at top).
This was my first attempt at GF baking…and it turned out okay as in it’s not burnt and definately edible. I think I had glass pan issues…and I didn’t realize you had to melt the coconut oil since the recipe didn’t specify in liquid form vs soft solid…but my main comments is that it’s just too eggy. Like French toast eggy. Definately not what I’m looking for as a GF bread option to eat in the morning WITH EGGS. On to the next recipe.
Fattening cattle with corn changes the lipid balance and is clearly not the natural diet for a grass eating cow. In Simple change in cattle diets could cut E. coli infection researchers have found that when cattle were fed hay or grass for just five days before slaughter, much less E. Coli cells were present in the animal's feces and virtually all surviving E. coli bacteria were not acid-resistant and were killed by human stomach acid.
I don’t want to give negative criticism, but (uh oh here we go) active bacterial cultures such as ACV and yogurt (I make my own homemade both) will not survive baking, frying, microwaving nor any other heating or freezing. Both bacteria carriers function as a leavening agent, but in terms of health benefits, you can use any good tasting, naturally sourced vinegar, and the yogurt will raise the dough but after being baked neither does anything for your gut. I also should point out to the folks determined to cook with coconut oil, that a MTC oil like coconut becomes almost the same as any other vegetable oil once it hits smoking temp. So baking it you might as well have saved your money and used butter or an oil. For MtC benefits and bacterial cultures, keep everything out of the microwave, have the coconut oil as a topping and yogurt as a smoothie on the side.
I have made these so many times in the last few weeks and have shared the recipe with many friends. They are delicious and so easy! I don’t really like the taste of Palm shortening, so I used coconut oil, softening it in the microwave, not melting. But don’t put it in wet ingredients because the coldness from the eggs will harden it again. Mix with dry ingredients, working out all the lumps with hands and distributing it evenly. I double the recipe and then separate it. I have added rosemary or dill or jalapenos/bacon/cheese to batter. So delicious. I am going to try more variations and add other herbs as I go. Thank you so much for such a great recipe. I was missing bread and these are perfect for chicken salad, tuna salad, turkey burgers, etc. And…. I save so much money because the gluten free breads in the grocery store are so expensive.

This has been happening to me too! I make it exactly how the recipe is written. I tried baking it longer and its still hollow in the middle and mushy. It used to come out perfect for me but the last 4 times it has been this way. I just recently moved and made the first loaf in the new oven and same thing!! So frustrating. Maybe cover it with foil and cook it even longer than 35 min? What rack should it be on? Please help!! I can’t live without my paleo bread!!
This was awesome. This is my second attempt at a no wheat bread. I did one before with coconut flour and it tasted like a salty cake. This is perfect. And I had to make few substitutions. Can’t wait to try the original recipe as I know it will taste even better. I had to substitute the flax meal and seeds with ground sesame and sesame seeds (no background on this, I made it up because I didn’t have flax seeds) and used olive oil instead of butter because I was too anxious to get it done and didn’t want to wait the melted butter to cool off. Even with this changes it browned perfectly, and it’s so fluffy!!! I’ll try toasting it to get a harder texture to be able to use it with toppings. Thank you very much for this recipe. 5 stars!!!
The Paleo Answer: 7 Days to Lose Weight, Feel Great, Stay Young by Loren Cordain. The author shows you how to supercharge the Paleo diet for optimal lifelong health and weight loss. Featuring a new prescriptive 7-day plan and surprising revelations from the author's original research, it's the most powerful Paleo guide yet. Published December 20, 2011.

I haven’t tried to make many low carb breads so I don’t have much of a basis for comparison. This bread is good if you don’t expect it to be like normal bread. It takes a bit of getting used to. It’s very dense and heavy, not light like my store-bought lower carb bread. My advice is to slice it as thinly as you can – I got 20 slices about 0.5 thick but thinner would be better. I’ve tried it with peanut butter and with homemade sugar-free strawberry jam, but I think it was best sliced thinly, toasted and used as crackers with ham, cheese, tomato etc.
I’ve been experimenting with your low carb corn bread recipe this week, not necessarily trying to emulate cornbread specifically but just to make a keto-friendly bread-like food, and that recipe was the first candidate I found browsing your site. I started off with a half recipe (fudging the fractional egg) because I only had around 2 tbsp of flaxmeal (brown, not golden) on hand. I quite enjoyed it, so I bought more flaxmeal and tried the recipe substituting hazelnut flour for almond, and again brown flaxmeal for golden and it was delicious (I gotta lay off! I can’t stop eating it, as I basically haven’t had bread in 3 years!) (brief note: I needed to bake quite a bit longer than you instructed both times.)
WOW! This bread is amazing! I have Gestational Diabetes, and have been struggling with bread since it has been spiking my sugars. Normally I don’t each much of it, but I was just craving it today. So I made a loaf and it is delicious! I went through the comments because I only have a full size loaf pan, and did as someone else mentioned, increased the recipe by .5 (for the eggs did 8 eggs rather than 7), and it came out the perfect size and absolutely delicious. Looking forward to enjoying it the rest of the week. I used a glass full size loaf and cooked for 40 minutes at 350 degrees. I topped it with extra flax seeds because I too love the nutty flavor of flax.

Made this tonight, and it came out delicious!! I subbed in grapeseed oil for the coconut oil, and used ground chia seed instead of the flax, because they are what I had on hand, and it is wonderful. Nice “whole grain” texture and nutty taste, so yummy just spread with good butter. Will definitely be making this again! I’m mostly Paleo, and LOVE your almond flour and coconut flour recipes, delicious and grain free. Thank you so much.
"Every fad diet thinks it has discovered the root of all evil," says Dr. Ochner. But nutrients in legumes, whole grains, and dairy—all of which are forbidden on the paleo diet—can help to lower the risk of osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease, reduce blood pressure, and promote a healthy weight, he says. Cutting dairy, the primary source of calcium and vitamin D in modern diets, is especially worrisome for women who want to avoid osteoporosis.
Deepika, It’s hard to tell exactly where the discrepancy occurred without being in the kitchen with you, but I can try to help. There is (surprisingly) quite a bit of variance between different brands, so if you used a different brand for almond flour, coconut flour, etc. that could have been a contributing factor. Also, was your ghee or coconut oil melted like the recipe says? Out of curiosity, how did the recipe turn out?
Thanks for the reply Adriana. What I meant by a quick mix in the Vitamix was that I “Vitamixed” it one more time to be positive it was as fine as could be. I keep almonds frozen and I use them up over time to make milk, then dehydrate the pulp and then turn it into flour. I will have to think about buying the flour already made again…seems like I’d be going backwards in my slow but steady journey of making the most of my whole ingredients. I wonder if blanched flour would work better…I’ve read that the the only difference with the skins is the little brown specks that don’t bother me. I may try again at some point.
Combining higher protein intake and fresh vegetables leads to another major benefit: blood sugar stabilization. Between 35 and 45 percent of the average Paleo diet is comprised of non-starchy fresh fruits and vegetables that won’t spike blood sugar levels, making it an optimal diet for diabetes prevention. This is because nearly all of these foods have low glycemic indices that are slowly digested and absorbed by the body.
As you might expect from the previous paragraph, eating plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables naturally leads to higher fiber intake. Dietary fiber is essential for good health, and despite what you’ve probably heard, whole grains aren’t the place to find it. Non-starchy vegetables contain eight times more fiber than whole grains and 31 times more fiber than refined grains. Even fruits contain twice as much fiber as whole grains and seven times more fiber than refined grains!
Five roots, both bitter and sweet, are staples in the Hiwi diet, as are palm nuts and palm hearts, several different fruits, a wild legume named Campsiandra comosa, and honey produced by several bee species and sometimes by wasps. A few Hiwi families tend small, scattered and largely unproductive fields of plantains, corn and squash. At neighboring cattle ranches in a town about 30 kilometers away, some Hiwi buy rice, noodles, corn flour and sugar. Anthropologists and tourists have also given the Hiwi similar processed foods as gifts (see illustration at top).

I cut the bread into thin slices and it is great toasted. I made a sandwich for my husband with bacon, lettuce and tomato and when I handed it to him he looked at me funny and after he took his first bite he asked me: “where did you buy this bread, can we eat bread now?” lol…. I told him I had made the bread with almond flour instead of wheat and he was thrilled.
Paleo Thin Bread® – Almond ( Paleo Bread ) (1 Net Carb) (3 Pack w/Free Shipping), is a great way to enjoy a healthy meal or snack with added flavor and health benefits. Paleo Bread – Almond is Gluten Free, Grain Free, Yeast Free, Soy Free, GMO Free, (7g Of Protein Per Slice), Low Carb and best of all delicious. Paleo Bread -Almond loaf contains six simple ingredients! *Nutritional Information Provided By Medallion Labs For Nutritional Accuracy **Freezes great for 12 Months** / Stay In Ketosis**”Paleo Breads Are Soft & Fluffy & Does NOT Crumble”

Oils are trickier. Loren Cordain, Ph.D., founder of The Paleo Diet Movement, breaks down which oils are healthy on the paleo diet: olive, walnut, flaxseed, macadamia, avocado and coconut oils are all allowed because they were gathered directly from the plant. While our hunter-gatherer ancestors probably did not consume flaxseed oil, it is allowed because of its content of high alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), a type of heart-healthy, anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty acid.

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The Primal Blueprint Cookbook: Primal, Low Carb, Paleo, Grain-Free, Dairy-Free and Gluten-Free by Mark Sisson and Jennifer Meier. Recipes include: Roasted Leg of Lamb with Herbs and Garlic, Salmon Chowder with Coconut Milk, Tomatoes Stuffed with Ground Bison and Eggs, and Baked Chocolate Custard. Recipes are simple and have limited ingredients. Complaints are the book is stuffed with unnecessary photos and proofreading could have been better, e.g. oven temperatures were left out. And recipes are not truly paleo. Despite what is on the cover dairy is used in some recipes. The Amazon reviews average to 4+ stars.
Food in Antiquity: A Survey of the Diet of Early Peoples (Expanded Edition) by Don R. Brothwell and Patricia Brothwell is a survey of what is known archaeologically about food and drink in pre-modern times. The chapter on insects includes their food value. In beverages it covers what happens to a neglected jar of fruit juice. Under cannibalism it shows evidence of this being done in paleo times, thought most of the work focuses on the classical and near-eastern civilizations, but occasional mention is made of the mesoamerican cultures as well. There is taxonomic and anatomical information.
I haven’t tried to make many low carb breads so I don’t have much of a basis for comparison. This bread is good if you don’t expect it to be like normal bread. It takes a bit of getting used to. It’s very dense and heavy, not light like my store-bought lower carb bread. My advice is to slice it as thinly as you can – I got 20 slices about 0.5 thick but thinner would be better. I’ve tried it with peanut butter and with homemade sugar-free strawberry jam, but I think it was best sliced thinly, toasted and used as crackers with ham, cheese, tomato etc.

Uhhh, YUM!!! I have been stalking this recipe for a couple weeks.. Finally decided to make it. Didn’t change anything except I used 3 whole eggs and 2 whites (not sure why. Thought I read in here somewhere that egg whites only will make the loaf lighter)… Anyway it’s AWESOME! So very tasty… It turned out better than even any wheat based bread I’ve tried to make in the past. This is a keeper… Especially great with Vermont cultured butter. I cut my loaf into 16 pieces. Easy to cut, way too easy to eat…. Could I add a few ripe bananas, walnuts, and Some spices and make banana bread??? I’m gonna try it!
Hi~ I tried to read all of the reviews to find this answer before asking, but there are a LOT of them! Instead, I’ll just ask 🙂 My husband cannot have anything almond related at the moment. Are there any other flours that would work instead of almond flour? I’ve made soooo many loaves of bread, and every single one of them was pretty terrible, and that’s even w/ very lowered standards! I also swore I’d not make another bread, but here I am…. Also, I’d have to sub in duck eggs for chicken eggs, which could throw another wrench into the plans.
This bread does have quite a few ingredients, but you’ll find that most are staple paleo and keto pantry ingredients. In the list below you’ll find details on several ingredients and possible subs. But if possible, please do try and make this recipe without any subs. As out of the 18 permutations we tried, this one really was terrific and the absolute best.
We have four of these separated, but I don’t know if they are oven safe. They have a little rubber, maybe silicone nobs on the end of the handles, but I’ve no idea if they can be used in the oven as they didn’t come in a package, they were bought separately and I am trying to find recipes for bread/buns that I can do that are quite easy and don’t require anything more than what I’ve already got.
I just tried this for the first time tonight and followed the recipe exactly. I bought all of your recommended brands of ingredients, including the right sized pan. The texture is great (though the bread is still hot out of the oven!) and the taste is pretty good. Let’s face it, it’s not yeasted/gluten bread. But it’s definitely a very acceptable substitute. I really appreciate the nutritional content of this bread. Most of the commercial gluten-free products make me crazy with their nutritional emptiness. Looking forward to trying more of your recipes.
Hi Paola, just tried your bread recipe yesterday. I proofed my dough in a Brod & Taylor proofing box at 88F for one hour. My dough rose, but not by much, not by 100%. I used Bob’s Redmill Fine Almond flour but might change to Anthony’s or King Arthur Flour super fine almond flour because my bread came out similar to a brick. Should I let my dough rise for more than one hour? Thank you Paola….love your site and recipes and think you are a genius!!
Weigh your ingredients. This will forever be a staple recommendation for any sort of gluten free baking here at gnom-gnom. As aside from leading to less dirty dishes, it will ensure consistent results time and time again. Remember that gluten free (and particularly keto) baking is notoriously finicky, and measuring by cups is anything but accurate. And if you don’t own a baking scale, measure with cups by dropping the ingredients onto them rather than scooping them out (which often leads to overpacking).

WOW! This bread is amazing! I have Gestational Diabetes, and have been struggling with bread since it has been spiking my sugars. Normally I don’t each much of it, but I was just craving it today. So I made a loaf and it is delicious! I went through the comments because I only have a full size loaf pan, and did as someone else mentioned, increased the recipe by .5 (for the eggs did 8 eggs rather than 7), and it came out the perfect size and absolutely delicious. Looking forward to enjoying it the rest of the week. I used a glass full size loaf and cooked for 40 minutes at 350 degrees. I topped it with extra flax seeds because I too love the nutty flavor of flax.
Hi John, You could possible try a hand mixer in a bowl instead of the food processor, but I haven’t tried it, so can’t vouch for the results. Most likely the bread would not be as tall because the mixer would completely deflate the first half of the egg whites when you add them to the batter. The second half should be folded so that part will be find. If you try with a bowl and hand mixer, let me know how that goes.
Since doing low carb the one thing I’ve really missed is bread. I used to eat it with almost every meal. My wife has been very negative about paleo bread recipes saying that it would be dry and crumbly. Well, I made some bean soup with ham and finally made your microwave bread. IT WAS FANTASTIC!!!!! I gave my wife a bite and she was amazed. It was moist, soft and delicious. Especially good knowing that it’s good for me, with no gluten or any other killers. Thank you so much for this recipe.
Michele, this bread is amazing! I made it without the golden flax meal because I didn’t have any. I made a loaf with eggs, according to your menu and one without for me since I’m allergic to them. I used Egg Replacement for them. It was the BEST paleo bread. I ordered the Golden Flax Meal on Amazon yesterday and plan to make this again. Thanks so much for sharing! Blessings to you!
i have been following your web page and i have made soooooo many things that my family loves the best being kale chips my 2 year old takes the bowl and runs away so no one can eat them. I am very very alergic to coconut. do you have any gluten free paleo like bread ideas to make? I live to make as much as possible from scratch.. i cant have gluten and my daughter and husband cant have dairy. if you have any ideas let me know. thank you so much I am such a big fan!

Combining higher protein intake and fresh vegetables leads to another major benefit: blood sugar stabilization. Between 35 and 45 percent of the average Paleo diet is comprised of non-starchy fresh fruits and vegetables that won’t spike blood sugar levels, making it an optimal diet for diabetes prevention. This is because nearly all of these foods have low glycemic indices that are slowly digested and absorbed by the body. 

I’ve been thinking about bringing paleo-friendly bread and rolls to LCK for some time now. But I knew before I did that I needed to make sure they fit specific criteria. They need the right flavor and fluffy, soft, air-y, bread-like texture. You see, I’ve never bothered buying gluten-free breads in the store. I never thought it was worth it because I always felt they were dense, not the right flavor, etc.

Advocates of the diet argue that the increase in diseases of affluence after the dawn of agriculture was caused by changes in diet, but others have countered that it may be that pre-agricultural hunter-gatherers did not suffer from the diseases of affluence because they did not live long enough to develop them.[30] Based on the data from hunter-gatherer populations still in existence, it is estimated that at age 15, life expectancy was an additional 39 years, for a total age of 54.[31] At age 45, it is estimated that average life expectancy was an additional 19 years, for a total age of 64 years.[32][33] That is to say, in such societies, most deaths occurred in childhood or young adulthood; thus, the population of elderly – and the prevalence of diseases of affluence – was much reduced. Excessive food energy intake relative to energy expended, rather than the consumption of specific foods, is more likely to underlie the diseases of affluence. "The health concerns of the industrial world, where calorie-packed foods are readily available, stem not from deviations from a specific diet but from an imbalance between the energy humans consume and the energy humans spend."[34]
Sometimes you don’t need a loaf of bread, and you just need enough for yourself to make a sandwich or to serve as a side to a hearty Paleo chili. This single serve recipe can easily be multiplied if needed, but it’s best when used as a one-serving bread when you don’t have the time, desire, or need for more than just enough for yourself. The way they’ve figure out how to make this Paleo friendly and ready to go in just a few minutes is impressive. It makes the perfect companion to all sorts of soups and stews, as the bookends to a sandwich, or as an accompaniment to eggs and bacon.
Bread was phenomenal!! I followed the recipe exactly, I had a bread pan that was about an inch wider than yours but bread still rose. Looks great, looks just like a loaf of banana bread! The bread is very buttery in flavor, I can’t have more than one slice it’s pretty rich. It’s a dense bread like banana bread. I was SO excited when I pulled it out of the oven and it looked and tasted good I did a little “I made BREAD!” dance. Alas, bread, I have missed you…
I too think it’s funny how many people basically ask permission to do substitutions, as if the recipe police will come down on them or something, or like you eluded to that maybe you can predict the exact outcome of every possible substitution. Victim of your own success!! : ) You are pretty good Elana so we won’t be surprised if you develop baking clairvoyance. Thank you for this recipe, after going Paleo this year I’ve really wanted to find some baking recipes I could feel good about eating. Excited to try this!!!
Thank you so much for this recipe! I have tried so many paleo bread recipes and this is the best one yet. My husband devoured half of it and he’s a very picky eater. I’m going to double the recipe next time so I can use my larger bread pan. I do have one question though. Do you think this recipe would work if I added bananas, or blueberries? I was thinking of doing that but wasn’t sure if that would effect the consistency.
And again, there’s no concrete scientific proof that the paleo diet wards off disease, Sandon says. Any evidence of its benefits is anecdotal. Although some studies seem to support the benefits of the paleo diet, many scientists still believe we don’t yet have enough evidence to know whether the eating approach is totally healthy and without risk. “Nobody knows the long-term effects of this diet because no one has researched it to any degree,” Sandon says. It’s not really a new concept; instead it’s one that’s been recycled through the years, she adds.
Chances are, if you're following the paleo diet, you're reallllly missing bread. We don't blame you! Bread is a huge part of our routines, from avocado toast at breakfast to tomato soup and grilled cheese for dinner. There's just too many good things to eat on bread! This recipe will help curb your carb-y cravings, and is sturdy enough to recreate all your favorite sandwiches and toasts. Curious? Continue reading for answers to our most frequently asked questions.
Hi. I purchased the fox run pan just to be able to make this bread. Although I like the taste, both times I’ve made this the bread has a large uncooked section in the middle. The second time I made sure to cook for the longer time and inserted a knife to check, which came out clean. Although the uncooked section is smaller, it is still there. I followed the recipe and do not know what went wrong. Any suggestions?
In making the case for meat, Cordain presents anecdotal evidence of Eskimos who lived their full life without a heart attack. The Eskimo diet consists of 97% meat, which he concedes causes all Eskimos to develop atherosclerosis—a common precursor to heart disease. But Cordain says Eskimos never die of heart disease. He discusses one Eskimo who lived 45 years and another who lived 53 years, both without heart disease! He then jumps to the conclusion that because these Eskimos didn’t get heart attacks, even with severe atherosclerosis, meat must have protected them from heart disease. So Cordain’s best case for lots of meat is that you can live to the ripe age of 45 or even 53 without a heart attack. But do people—even unhealthy smokers or the obese—generally get heart attacks before age 53?

Hi Jen, It sounds like it needed to bake for longer – this is why it sunk and was still moist. The timing varies by ovens and even different pans. I hope you’ll try it again and just keep it in there for longer. You can cover the top if it starts to brown too much. For the one you made, depending on how moist it was in the middle, you may be able to salvage it somewhat by pan frying the slices.
The Paleo diet is promoted as a way of improving health.[2] There is some evidence that following this diet may lead to improvements in terms of body composition and metabolic effects compared with the typical Western diet[6] or compared with diets recommended by national nutritional guidelines.[9] There is no good evidence, however, that the diet helps with weight loss, other than through the normal mechanisms of calorie restriction.[10] Following the Paleo diet can lead to an inadequate calcium intake, and side effects can include weakness, diarrhea, and headaches.[3][10]
The Lazy Paleo Enthusiast's Cookbook: A Collection of Practical Recipes and Advice on How to Eat Healthy, Tasty Food While Spending as Little Time in the Kitchen as Possible by Sean Robertson. The author is a recovering vegan and in the first half of the book recounts his dietary experiences using some paleo foods to restore his health. You learn that the author's main strategy is to make food in large batches which can be reheated to provide dinners for several days running. The second half of the book contains 28 recipes. Some borderline or nonpaleo ingredients do appear, but most of the recipes are more paleo than not. Published November 15, 2011.

This is the best gluten free bread recipe I’ve tried! So glad I found this. It’s not crumbly, very bread-like, just a bit dense. I loosely followed the recipe and changed a few things. I omitted the maple syrup to make it whole30. I didn’t have arrowroot so I subbed tapioca starch per some of the comments and added some chia seeds as well. Since there was so much coconut oil in it, I plan on experimenting and using olive oil so it doesn’t have too much of a coconut taste. My husband didn’t really notice it though. He is the gluten free one and he’s very picky about his bread, but this got his approval! I added some almonds on top and garlic and Italian herb seasoning to give it a flavor boost. I had trouble with this in the blender, maybe because I don’t have a very good one, so I will just use a mixing bowl next time. Thank you for sharing! I will be telling my friends about this!

Thank you so much for this recipe. I haven t had bread since starting Paleo about 3 1/2 months ago. Then my husband asked me to make him Zucchini Blueberry Bread, which I find irresistible. I made his bread last night then found this recipe. I made it today. I added some shredded zucchini and a handful of blueberries to it. It appeared done after 90 seconds but had a raw section inside. So I simply microwaved it a little more. It was absolutely delicious. Thanks again.
Hi Connie, I don’t recommend using whole eggs in this recipe. The two recipes are very different. The egg whites in this recipe are beaten to stiff peaks to create the fluffiness. You could fold the yolks in later, but you’d need to modify the other ingredients, and besides, the bread would turn out very egg-y. The other recipe has fewer eggs than this one, and they are added differently.
I made this recipe tonight – definitely the best tasting paleo bread I’ve had. The bread didn’t rise very much, so maybe I’d do a double recipe and cook longer to get bigger slices. It also turned out a little on the crumbly side – I think mine needed more liquid because the batter was fairly dry when I put it in the pan. As someone mentioned above, I also like that it’s not super eggy tasting! I gave slices to my roommates and a friend (they’re not paleo) and they both thought it was really good – which is sayin’ something! Next time I will try a few tweaks to make is sandwich suitable, but this recipe is really tasty.

I have recently discovered your website and I’m so pleased that I did. There is so much content there. It’s the bread I’m particularly interested in at this point since I have not had any bread for about two and a half years so I went straight there. I tried your world famous paleo bread and I must say it was very nice. However it does not look like your bread in that mine was much darker and much denser. I tried to find a comment where you addressed this issue but I only got as far as some comments regarding the height of the bread. You stated that the tin size was most likely incorrect. I’m sure my tin as a bit on the big side but when I look at the pic of your bread I can see yours is a much lighter bread than mine and also much lighter in colour.


The paleo diet runs on the same foods our hunter-gather ancestors supposedly ate: fruits, vegetables, meats, seafood, and nuts. "By following these nutritional guidelines, we put our diet more in line with the evolutionary pressures that shaped our current genetics, which in turn positively influences health and well being," says Loren Cordain, PhD, professor of health and exercise science at Colorado State University and author of The Paleo Diet. He says the diet lessens the body's glycemic load, has a healthy ratio of saturated-to-unsaturated fatty acids, increases vitamin and nutrient consumption, and contains an optimal balance of protein, fat, and carbohydrates.
The NY Times had a blog article on Good News on Saturated Fat which is reporting on Gary Taubes's interpretation of the new report in The New England Journal of Medicine on a two-year diet experiment in Israel. A followup is the post The Fat Fight Goes On where Gary rebuts the arguments against the study. And here's a good interview with Taubes (and includes a good summary): Gary Taubes on Cold Fusion, Good Nutrition and What Makes Bad (and Good) Science.
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