Early man didn’t have microwaves, but if they did they surely could have whipped up some of this Paleo bread. Sometimes you need or want bread in a hurry, like if you forgot to make it, or if you realize that a meal would be perfectly complete if it just had some bread to go with it. While there may not be any ancestral connection to our love of bread, it’s hard to argue that it’s become a staple of many diets, and really helps to satiate an appetite. But since it represents a part of the Neolithic time, bread isn’t truly Paleo even if it’s made with Paleo friendly ingredients.
This 5 minute bread literally blew my mind! Wanna know why? Well for starters, it is super easy to make! Only a few ingredients. Throw it in a blender (or food processor). Then bake in the oven. And after it comes out??? Well, that’s when the really good stuff starts happening! Like devouring slice after slice:) This bread is so incredibly soft on the inside and has a moist texture like a loaf of homemade sandwich bread.
I made dressing/stuffing out of this bread! I cut the bread into slices, then cut the slices into cubes. I put them on a metal pan and into my toaster oven on low temperature and let them crisp up. It takes a good while, but they DO get crisp! Then I have my croutons for the dressing. The dressing I made was delicious. I think the next time I make the bread to use for croutons I’m going to add onion powder and sage to the mixture before baking so the croutons will be seasoned some before I begin making the dressing! Love this bread! It is the most like wheat flour bread that I have tried! Thanks Maya!
ok my bread did not quite look like this.it had ammonia scents. serious…. seriously working recipes….open to suggestion…my husband’s mum was a a baker…..I fail at every attempt to provide. Your assistance is helpful.thx I am the ever so lucky lin..plan to stay lucky….(ps do this b/c my bs is borderline.fasting bs +90……..and though, my spouse refuses to acknowledge it he has issues as wel).180 after a mango whatever…I love this man, and plan to keep him with me. forever….pls assist..so tired of numbers that are compromised….bull ..we are a unique community because we care…many others are impacted, they just do not connect… We are the only people who appear to care about what elevated glucose does to people….I care for my mum…….she is blind…..confused……multiple strokes..pls, keep helping…Mom was a pilot, a photograhpher, an independent woman from the age of 15. Now, she lves in a bedroom, vision gone, and momory deplleted…….life does not have to end this way. She loves your recipes……I prep them……you have made her happy…love, lucky lin………..
Hi Lina, the secret to baking perfectly with almond flour is by using the “right” kind almond flour. This means your almond flour should be ground into fine powder and have the skin removed. There are only a few brands I recommend. Both Honeyville and Welbee’s blanched almond flour work well for baking. Bob’s Red Mill brand will not works, it creates oily, dense baked goods that also sink in the middle.
I’m so sorry your bread crumbles, that’s so disappointing. That your dough didn’t become a firm ball indicates that a measurement might have been off. My best recommendations for baking grain-free include having all ingredients at room temperature, have the oven preheated, to measure everything accurately and to notice if things are happening the way they are supposed to, ie.: your dough is not firm. A soft dough would need you to add more flour to it, although if the dough is too soft because too much milk or fat was added, it will throw off the balance of everything else. Baking is very precise in this way, try it again and keep me posted on the outcome.
The Stone Age Diet: Based on in-depth studies of human ecology and the diet of man by Walter L. Voegtlin. This was self-published back in 1975. Only a couple hundred copies were printed and distributed to friends and relatives. No one knew the book existed until some years later. In no way is he the father of the paleo diet. It is impossible to purchase. Apparently his descendents are planning a reprint, though the book is poorly written and not based upon factual anthropological information that even was available then. We have put up his Functional and Structural Comparison of Man's Digestive Tract with that of a Dog and Sheep. And a PDF can be found here.
As I type I have my first loaf of Paleo Bread in the oven. I live in South Africa where we apparently don’t have any flax meal…so I imported some from your side of the world and can’t wait to taste the results. My daughter, who suffers with severe juvenile arthritis and for whom we all made the conversion to Paleo, and I made it together and experimented with your silver dollar pancakes for fun at the same time. Those were delicious and enjoyed with blueberries and a bit of honey.
Get rid of the temptation – if you’re gonna go at this thing with a full head of steam, remove all the junk food from your house.  It’s going to take a few weeks for your body to adjust to burning fat instead of glucose, and you might want to eat poorly here and there. If there’s no food in your house to tempt you, it will be much easier to stay on target.
This came out better than I expected it to actually. I did not have coconut flour so I added an extra 1/4c of almond meal. It was a tad bland but other than that a nice bread. I think the coconut flour would add to its flavor and sweetness. I will try again and add a banana just to give it a little more flavor. the pan I used was a regular loaf pan and it was a bit thin but otherwise a nice bread. My daughter enjoyed with peanutbutter and banana mashed together and I had it with her egg salad.
Fast forward 15 years later and I live in my own house with air conditioning and I make the rules. 🙂 But even though I still turn the oven on to bake in the summer (I just have to some days! Hello, it’s my job.) I still have the notion that summertime = no ovens. So I’m always looking for healthy treats to make that don’t require the oven or much effort.
Alright. So I saw this recipe yesterday, and knew I had to make it- even on a weeknight. Blender bread = so so easy (thank you!) Long story short, we’ve already eaten the whole loaf. My husband made awesome BLT’s for dinner, my toddler helped himself to a couple after dinner pieces. 😀 THEN. This morning my husband used the remaining slices to make open face breakfast sammies… runny egg and all. I did bake the loaf for quite a bit longer than you posted… but I’m pretty sure that is a reflection of our sad oven more than anything else. The bread has an awesome rustic texture… I’m going to try bruschetta with it next!! We did give each slice a quick fry in bacon grease to “toast” right before serving. Sidenote, I’m 6mo pregnant… so 2 full BLT’s is totally the norm for me right now 😀 Anyway, THANK YOU! This is my first time landing at your site… and I can’t wait to explore more of your recipes!!

Hi Ginger, I personally haven’t tried making this bread into buns. I think the texture is a bit different, but it may work also. You could bake the batter into an english muffin pan like this one http://amzn.to/1TbU31n or this one http://amzn.to/23RkXeu. Please let me know how it goes if you try it and post a photo here so I can see how they turn out.


Love, love, love! I make a double batch and freeze them with great results. I toast these rolls for all kinds of sandwiches including toasted with bacon, egg, avocado for breakfast. Recently I started sprinkling Trader Joe’s Everything but the Bagel Sesame Seasoning Blend on the tops before baking. Toasted with butter is a great substitute for bagels or hard rolls. Thank you Lexi for such a great recipe!


I have made 4 loaves so far. First one was the best, I used olive oil. The remaining 3 did rise but only in the center of the loaf. I did add sunflower and pumpkin seeds plus a few goji berries in the 3 loves and wondering if it’s making is heavy. I also increased the cooking time to 45 mins.. the bread tastes amazing!!!!!! Even my moody teenager was beaming with pleasure while she went through half a loaf! Any thoughts why it’s rising only in the center? Thanks for the recipe ☺️
This is the best grain-free bread recipe I have ever tried. I didn’t have the loaf pan so I used one of my small casserole dishes and it came out square and a little darker around the edges. I used 1 1/2oz. of coconut oil and mixed it with 1/2oz. of melted butter and it came out really moist. It also came out dark like whole wheat bread, so I am assuming that I used just a little too much flax meal. I love you for taking the time to perfect this!!! I’m thinking of making a spice bread next time. Let you know if it works!!
I finally made this recipe BUT as I was about to add the water, I had a choking fit. When I finally recovered I finished adding the ingredients. The mixture looked really dry but I added it to the pan baked it. With 10 minutes left baking, I found the water on the window sill. Hmmmm, I finished baking it and tasted the biscuit like mound. I must say, it tastes delicious still. 🤗
OMG…Could your FABULOUS coconut palm syrup/recipe be used/considered as the ultra-expensive COCONUT NECTAR?..If so…this is sheer BRILLIANCE as it has provided a needed “Eureka” moment for me in my quest for a low glycemic substitute for agave or honey..Is the resulting syrup suitable for use in this fashion in baking?…Thank you so much for contributing your wonderful idea.
Hi John, You could possible try a hand mixer in a bowl instead of the food processor, but I haven’t tried it, so can’t vouch for the results. Most likely the bread would not be as tall because the mixer would completely deflate the first half of the egg whites when you add them to the batter. The second half should be folded so that part will be find. If you try with a bowl and hand mixer, let me know how that goes.
Jazzmin, you are correct and the active cultures in the yogurt will not survive during baking. However, the reason why I mentioned those facts about yogurt on my post is because a lot of people following a paleo diet simply won’t eat dairy because at one point dairy was classified as “not paleo”. There are so many amazing health benefits from eating fermented foods and raw, organic dairy from pasture raised animals that I feel it is important to educate people.

Thank you for sharing this recipe, I made them in a 8 inch square baking dish and cut into 4, which worked great! I just bought a muffin top pan today and will be using that to make a double batch this weekend! Taste and texture of these are amazing! Just what I needed for sandwiches to take to work! NOW, I’m intrigued and will be trying your other recipes! Thanks again 🙂


We do the honeyville and get it from Amazon. My Holistic practitioner is fanatical about food and food that has been grown with contaminated water and thus she gets all her food tested. This is one of the only ones she says is clean from contaminates from pesticides to hidden mercury and arsenic from contaminated water, etc. Whether it’ll always be that way who knows.
This was awesome. This is my second attempt at a no wheat bread. I did one before with coconut flour and it tasted like a salty cake. This is perfect. And I had to make few substitutions. Can’t wait to try the original recipe as I know it will taste even better. I had to substitute the flax meal and seeds with ground sesame and sesame seeds (no background on this, I made it up because I didn’t have flax seeds) and used olive oil instead of butter because I was too anxious to get it done and didn’t want to wait the melted butter to cool off. Even with this changes it browned perfectly, and it’s so fluffy!!! I’ll try toasting it to get a harder texture to be able to use it with toppings. Thank you very much for this recipe. 5 stars!!!
I really wanted to keep this nut and seed paleo bread more on the seed side. Haha, you get my point. The only nut that is really involved is almond in the almond flour. The rest are seeds such as pumpkin seeds, chia seed, and poppyseed, which you can interchange with flax or sunflower seeds. Either way, it truly gives the bread a nutty flavor that’s not too heavy. Cool?
This is a lovely, easy to make, dense bread. I really enjoyed it. I do not own a magic line pan but I purchased a “medium” sized bread pan and it seemed to work well. The bread may have come out a bit short though… I made this to use as sandwich bread in my son’s lunches. It is a bit denser than I was anticipating but it really tastes good. I just had a slice with jam and it’s filling too. This would be great as a sweet bread :). Thank you!
Diana Schwarzbein is another M.D. that has come to realize that low carb is what works. See reviews at The Schwarzbein Principle. The book is based on her work with insulin-resistant patients with Type II diabetes. She concludes that low-fat diets cause heart attacks, eating fat makes you lose body fat, and it's important to eat high-cholesterol foods every day.
New here, but loving your recipees so far (totally game changer for my diet and life)! I’ve tried this bread a few times now, but am struggling with it a little bit and was hoping that you could help me try to figure out what to try next. The taste is fantastic, but I’m having trouble with the rise. My yeast is bubbling and I’ve had it proving on my oven (which is pretty hot! –too hot?). The structure inside looks like there were air bubbles, but they got knocked out or something (sort of squished), but your picture looks incredible so I’m hoping that I can change something. The taste seems a little dense and chewy so far. I’m very new to baking, so it might also be a bake problem. I’m in Chicago.
NeanderThin: Eat Like a Caveman to Achieve a Lean, Strong, Healthy Body (Hardcover) by Ray Audette, with Troy Gilchrist, was one of the early paleo diet authors. His home page NeanderThin [now restored from archive.org] has a diet based on the ideas of paleolithic nutrition. The diet can be followed as a low-carb, moderate or high carb diet, depending upon whether and how much fruit is used. You can read up through page 19 of the book at Google Books. The original press release from 1999. [The webmaster has an extra copy with the author's signature for sale. It has the original lime-purple cover. Pristine new condition. $60 (shipping included). Paypal only. Use e-mail link at page bottom.]
Evolution of the Human Diet: The Known, the Unknown, and the Unknowable by Peter S. Ungar. Diet is key to understanding the ecology and evolution of our distant ancestors and their kin, the early hominins. A study of the range of foods eaten by our progenitors underscores just how unhealthy many of our diets are today. This volume brings together authorities from disparate fields to offer new insights into the diets of our ancestors. Paleontologists, archaeologists, primatologists, nutritionists and other researchers all contribute pieces to the puzzle. The book has four sections: Reconstructed diets based on hominin fossils--tooth size, shape, structure, wear, and chemistry, mandibular biomechanics. Archaeological evidence of subsistence--stone tools and modified bones. Models of early hominin diets based on the diets of living primates--both human and non-human, paleoecology, and energetics. Nutritional analyses and their implications for evolutionary medicine.
Some Paleo dieters emphasize that they never believed in one true caveman lifestyle or diet and that—in the fashion of Sisson's Blueprint—they use our evolutionary past to form guidelines, not scripture. That strategy seems reasonably solid at first, but quickly disintegrates. Even though researchers know enough to make some generalizations about human diets in the Paleolithic with reasonable certainty, the details remain murky. Exactly what proportions of meat and vegetables did different hominid species eat in the Paleolithic? It's not clear. Just how far back were our ancestors eating grains and dairy? Perhaps far earlier than we initially thought. What we can say for certain is that in the Paleolithic, the human diet varied immensely by geography, season and opportunity. "We now know that humans have evolved not to subsist on a single, Paleolithic diet but to be flexible eaters, an insight that has important implications for the current debate over what people today should eat in order to be healthy," anthropologist William Leonard of Northwestern University wrote in Scientific American in 2002.
I just made this today, and my husband, toddler, and I all loved it! We used ours for cheese and tomato sandwiches, and my husband managed to eat about half of the loaf before it even cooled. Like another person mentioned, I had to bake mine longer, but for me it was nearly twice as long (I’m at a relatively high altitude, maybe that’s why?). As yet another person said, it will now be a staple in our home too!
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