When it comes to Paleo desserts, this one is top notch; your taste buds will go wild for this pie-turned-ice-cream that’s also dairy-free! You’ll use coconut cream and almond milk to make a velvety smooth consistency with a perfect crunch from the pecans. Nuts like pecans are said to help aid weight loss since they enhance satiety and boost your metabolism!
So, it’s my LAST DAY of the Whole30 (and perhaps yours, too!) the last day of January, and it’s time to welcome some Paleo treats back into my life.  And yours, of course.   It’s almost Valentines Day, right?!  And – maybe it’s just me – but I can’t do Valentines Day without my fair share of chocolate.   Luckily there are so many easy, deliciously indulgent chocolate recipes that taste classically rich but are made without any unhealthy ingredients.
Hi Maya, I have made this twice and the first was actually closer than the second! The second one was raised really well when I put the foil on for the last 10-15 mins of cook time and when I took it out 12 mins later it had completely fallen! Now it is almost wet in the center though there are air pockets in it, it’s very odd. The first loaf was pretty flat the whole time and I am pretty sure that was because I didn’t have my egg whites whipped enough but they were spot on for the second loaf. I am also thinking it might be my baking powder after reading some of the comments. I plan to try again and just use a baking soda/cream of tartar mix rather than the baking powder. Any other suggestions? Anyone? LOL!

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Hi there, it’s Lacey! I’m the editor and main writer for A Sweet Pea Chef. I'm a food blogger, photographer, videographer, clean eating expert, and mommy of four. I also run the awesome free Take Back Your Health Community, am the healthy and clean weekly meal planner behind No-Fail Meals, and a little bit in love with Clean Eating. Be sure to check out my free beginner’s guide to eating clean and follow me on YouTube and Instagram to get my latest recipes and healthy eating inspiration.
I am a little confused about beating the egg whites with a hand mixer. I used 12 large egg whites as the recipe says. However, I did not add cream of tartar as I have none. I have been beating these egg whites for almost 40 minutes with an electric hand mixer and I still have not yet come to the consistency as your photo shows for stiff egg whites. So my questions are, is this amount of time normal for beating the egg whites? And what amount of time would you recommend if this is not the normal amount of time?
I just tried this for the first time tonight and followed the recipe exactly. I bought all of your recommended brands of ingredients, including the right sized pan. The texture is great (though the bread is still hot out of the oven!) and the taste is pretty good. Let’s face it, it’s not yeasted/gluten bread. But it’s definitely a very acceptable substitute. I really appreciate the nutritional content of this bread. Most of the commercial gluten-free products make me crazy with their nutritional emptiness. Looking forward to trying more of your recipes.
I just found this recipe and I notice that the recipes are very similar: this one has the addition of a little coconut flour, half the salt and half the vinegar, but maintains the baking soda quantity. How does the the texture of this bread compare to your low carb corn bread? I’m very curious about what went into the decisions that differentiate the two breads.
I made this yesterday. I made 1.5 times the recipe for a larger loaf pan and used apple butter (no sugar, just reduced apple) instead of yogurt or coconut butter. I had the same issue with the center being uncooked. Lesson learned that it needs to stay in longer but the pieces we cut off from around the center were very good. I was very impressed with this recipe. Thank you!
Oh me… oh my. Back then, I would have pulled out the food processor, opened up my bulk bag of almonds and blended for a good 5-15 minutes ’til I got just the perfect smooth consistency of creamy almond butter. Then, carefully transfer that mess-prone goop (scientific name for nut butter consistency) into a large Tupperware, spend like 15 good minutes wiping off flecks of almond butter goop that had flown all over the kitchen, then wash all the dishes (you know how long this takes when you have almond butter grease staunchly refusing to let go of its dish territory), then dry all the dishes (because: counter space, ‘nuff said), then make these bars.
For the dry bits, I would use a flour sifter or a sieve depending on what you have in the kitchen. Adding in the wet would require a spoon. The food processor simply takes out the labor of mixing it by hand. I haven’t made this one yet (tomorrow I will) but I’ve made banana bread more times than I can remember and only once has it been done in a food processor.
I’ve made this bread several times now in a traditional loaf pan and it came out great. A little short, but fully cooked and tasty and since i wasn’t using it to make a sandwich I was ok with the short, squatty loaf. The other day i decided to add the magic line loaf pan to my amazon order just to see what was so great about using this kind of pan. I made the recipe (the first one) just as I always have, same ingredients, same proportions, no subs and my bread came out barely cooked. The whole inside was raw. I continued to bake it and continued to bake it…..for another 45 min! and still raw. I pulled off the cooked “sides” and put the raw goopy mess back in the pan for another 30 min. Still raw in the middle. Not sure what’s so “magic” about this pan….???
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I have to say I am not paleo but am very gluten sensitive. I do not enjoy the texture of many GF breads. I have been trying and looking for bread recipes that were good and grainy and would taste good untoasted for sandwiches. I really enjoy this bread! No toasting necessary! I enjoy playing with recipes so I did grind in some oatmeal for part of the flour. Or ground quinoa. Also have replaced some of the almond flour wth 1/2 cup of cassava flour (from yucca root). Thank you for this great recipe! 

For example, although white potatoes were recorded as being available during the Paleolithic era, they are usually avoided on the Paleo diet because of their high glycemic index. Processed foods are also technically off limits due to an emphasis on fresh foods, but some Paleo diets allow frozen fruits and vegetables because the freezing process preserves most nutrients.
Made this divine loaf for the very first time this morning, following the recipe exactly. It’s already half gone! I’ve tried multiple paleo sandwich bread recipes and none of them have turned out great…except this one. It’s simply delicious. Thank you so much for sharing this recipe. It’s obvious that a lot of trial and error went into perfecting it. It’s so so good!
I’ve made this in my bread machine several times, and it comes out beautifully. I double the recipe, choose the quick bread setting and it produces a nice 1 kilo loaf (2.2 pounds). I’m using a Kenwood model BM450 as I’m in the UK, but I think the same machine is marketed in the US by DeLonghi, if anyone wants to compare specifications. I just dump all the ingredients in the pan in order, and give a couple of stirs around the edges of the pan with a spatula while its on the mix cycle (though I’m not sure if its even necessary), and that’s it.
I have a processor but I use my big girl lifting weights mixer. I use the whip not the paddle to mix first the eggs getting in lots of air and and fold in 2 cups of thick yogurt cheese.(Regular non fat plain yogurt filtered though a coffee filter in the refrig.) I use the paddle and add the dry ingredients. I mix them on slow and just for a brief make sure that the dough it is all the same all the way through. I am seeing now whether I can replace the coconut oil with extra virgin elixir of the olives as sweet is not great with horseradish on roast beef. I’m also thinking that although it doesn’t rise much if at all that if I patted it into a loaf shape in some way and oiled the crust heavily it might have a smooth crust. and then plop it in the pan. I toast it like for egg in the hole by browning it in a heavy frying pan. Okay it is not bread bread but it better than no b read at all. And best of all I like it just fine and that’s what counts in the long run. Food should not be such a big deal. It should get your from point A to Point B with style and class not slathering butter on just cooked doughy yeasty hard on the digestion bread for me any more. I’m going to try going all almond flour as the coconut flour has so moisture and sweet ness that contributes to the heavy texture I think Of course the moisture is what makes it stick together too, Everything is a work in progress remember to use your processor to make crumbs out of the not so hot loaves. Breaded lemon dill tilapia anyone?
I’ve gone around the web finding the best fast easy, and absolutely delicious easy paleo desserts. Because eating paleo is hard enough without having to spend two hours making a complicated dessert only to have it come out badly because paleo baking is so darn finicky. All of the recipes in this roundup are tried, tested, and true, take 45 minutes or less to prepare, and should satisfy all your cravings for easy paleo desserts. So let’s get started!
Hi again Adriana. I tried again yesterday, with the same flour. I added a little extra yoghurt (2/3 cup) and I also added some almond milk (I think about 1/4 cup), to make more of a batter. The bread turned out great. It’s a little moist, a bit like cake, but it tastes amazing! So I actually think that the flour reacts a bit like coconut flour and soaks up a lot of moisture.
I ran out of coconut oil last week and my replacement doesn’t arrive until tomorrow. Desperate to try this I used canolia oil instead. I acknowledge that it’s properties are very different than coconut oil. That said, the bread is fantastic, a bit oily (but I bet that is the fault of my decision), and the taste is really eggy almost like french toast. I also lack a food processor so I mixed it all by hand after sifting the flours together.
Well something is wrong it keeps telling me a problem has occurred with the website and realoading. I didn’t use any wheat flour only the sunflower seed flour I made. I whipped the egg whites with some cream of tarter. I will try your blender idea. I did not take a picture but it came out heavy and dense but it did rise pretty good considering I toasted the sunflower flour after I made the flour because I did t know I was supposed to do it before. It made it a little freaky. I will cut back on the butter next time. I can’t tell you how much better the tast was from toasting the flour. Ok I better stop my computer does not want to cooperate. Thank you so much I will be in touch again thanks for the great recipes.
Cheryl, We use beef gelatin in this recipe to act as a binder and add a bit more chewiness to help simulate regular bread. (If you’re interested, we talk more about using beef gelatin in keto baking in this post: https://theketoqueens.com/crispy-low-carb-indian-flatbread-recipe/.) We haven’t experimented with this recipe to omit the beef gelatin, but you might be able to get a similar result using a bit more psyllium husk powder, flaxseed meal, ground chia seeds, xanthan gum, or guar gum. If you decide to play around with the recipe, please let us know how it goes! 
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