Hi Louise. Thank you SO much for this recipe. I’ve done low carb before but am a newbie with the Paleo thing. I’ve never been one to eat bread or pasta very often anyway, but I do get a craving every now and then. I was skeptical that this would turn out terrible like the first time I made blueberry whole wheat muffins for my daughter (which she wouldn’t eat, and she’s not a picky eater), but I decided to try it anyway since it was such a small portion and it wouldn’t feel wasteful if I hated it. I was still skeptical after I took this bread out of the microwave because it looked really “eggy” from the outside. Once I let it cool and sliced it, however, it looked more “normal” so I was relieved. Once I ate it, it was wonderful! Great texture, buttery flavor (I used the flax meal because I already had it on hand; only change I made was that I put 3 tablespoons of butter instead of 2-1/2)… I didn’t even need any toppings (butter, syrup, nothing!). I literally ate it all by itself and pushed my soup to the side. So thank you very much! You have eased some of my worries about whether or not I will be able to stick with this way of living. I can’t wait to have my daughter try it. I know she will love it just as much as I do.
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Our family LOVES your paleo bread recipe (among others–like the muffins, cupcakes, cookies…) I’m wondering if have any plans to work on a Paleo Tortilla?? Mark’s Daily Apple posted one–I’ve made it a couple of times–changing the recipe a bit–but have not figured out a way to keep the tortilla from falling apart once you fill it. Any suggestions or tips would be GREATLY appreciated.
Of course Wikipedia has a page on the Paleolithic Diet. It is quite thorough. It also isn't clear about the lean/fatty meat debate between the followers of Loren Cordain and a slew of others, and pushes lean meat. It is weak on the variations of the diet. Then it restricts fermented beverages. Even butterflies eat fermented fruit. Why wouldn't our paleo ancestors also?
If you’ve ever considered (or tried) the Paleo diet, your first thought was probably, “ugh, another one with no bread?!” We feel you, it’s a tough moment when you hear your beloved carbs must go. ICYMI, the Paleo diet cuts out grains and legumes in favor of a protein- and veggie-rich diet. Sure, Wonder Bread wasn’t part of a caveman’s diet, but that doesn’t mean modern-day humans haven’t found a way around the rules.

Advocates of the diet argue that the increase in diseases of affluence after the dawn of agriculture was caused by changes in diet, but others have countered that it may be that pre-agricultural hunter-gatherers did not suffer from the diseases of affluence because they did not live long enough to develop them.[30] Based on the data from hunter-gatherer populations still in existence, it is estimated that at age 15, life expectancy was an additional 39 years, for a total age of 54.[31] At age 45, it is estimated that average life expectancy was an additional 19 years, for a total age of 64 years.[32][33] That is to say, in such societies, most deaths occurred in childhood or young adulthood; thus, the population of elderly – and the prevalence of diseases of affluence – was much reduced. Excessive food energy intake relative to energy expended, rather than the consumption of specific foods, is more likely to underlie the diseases of affluence. "The health concerns of the industrial world, where calorie-packed foods are readily available, stem not from deviations from a specific diet but from an imbalance between the energy humans consume and the energy humans spend."[34]
Hi Gabriel, thank you! I think using bananas in this recipe will not work in place of the arrowroot. Although the bananas are also a starch, it will add moisture and affect the overall texture and taste. You could maybe substitute the yogurt for the bananas, but again the taste of your bread will be different. I have a few banana bread recipes on this blog. Do a search for banana bread to find them.
It’s easy to find more guidance online, but a book also makes a handy reference. "The Paleo Diet," for example, outlines basic Paleo principles and offers three “levels” that allow for different degrees of cheating – three “open meals” per week on the “entry level” plan, two on “maintenance” and just one on “maximal.” Depending on the level, you might also get “transitional” condiments (low-fat dressing and salsa) and drinks (coffee, beer or wine in moderation) to wash down the meat and plants. You can use the levels as you like. Start with the first and move gradually to the more restrictive – or just stay put. For more dramatic changes, head right to the third.
Hi Mindy – same here. But I did read in a comment about 1 or 2 years ago the same thing. From what I remember from those comments, others said the type of food we make from Elana’s baked recipes are just not designed to sit for more than 2 – 3 days. Other commenters chimed in and said their family eats up everything they bake, so nothing sits long enough to get the 3-day-old smell.
Well… it turned out beautifully. It rose evenly, it was light, fluffy and baked through. It tasted very good, both plain and toasted with butter. I truthfully do not know if I would add the butter the next time I make a loaf because I was so pleased with this version. I will likely reduce the erythritol to 1 tablespoon or less for a more subtle sweetness in the future. This recipe has so many flavour possibilities and I look forward to trying out all of my ideas using this excellent base. It is also good to know that it can be made without the additional fat component. Don’t get me wrong, I am keto and a committed high fat enthusiast but slathering some fat on top of the bread… butter, pâté, nut butter… will work just fine for me.

While this sounds good in theory, scientists have a problem with its accuracy. “Anthropologists familiar with our Paleolithic ancestors’ behavior agree that these early humans did not follow any one style of eating. Basically, they ate whatever and whenever they could," said Neal Malik, an assistant professor at the School of Natural Health Arts and Sciences of Bastyr University. "They didn’t purposely follow a ‘clean’ diet — they just ate whatever was available to ensure survival. In fact, some scientists have gone so far as to say that early humans had a diet similar to pigs."
Even if eating only foods available to hunter–gatherers in the Paleolithic made sense, it would be impossible. As Christina Warinner of the University of Zurich emphasizes in her 2012 TED talk, just about every single species commonly consumed today—whether a fruit, vegetable or animal—is drastically different from its Paleolithic predecessor. In most cases, we have transformed the species we eat through artificial selection: we have bred cows, chickens and goats to provide as much meat, milk and eggs as possible and have sown seeds only from plants with the most desirable traits—with the biggest fruits, plumpest kernels, sweetest flesh and fewest natural toxins. Cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts and kale are all different cultivars of a single species, Brassica oleracea; generation by generation, we reshaped this one plant's leaves, stems and flowers into wildly different arrangements, the same way we bred Welsh corgis, pugs, dachshunds, Saint Bernards and greyhounds out of a single wolf species. Corn was once a straggly grass known as teosinte and tomatoes were once much smaller berries. And the wild ancestors of bananas were rife with seeds.

Thank you so much for what you are doing! I’m making my second loaf now and my family enjoyed the first one immensely. I finally was able to enjoy a poached egg on toast again. Your recipes are so easy to follow, and even substitute with. For instance I just finished baking up a ton of your “thin mints”, and was low on Almond Flour, so I just threw in what I had, about a cup, and then added a half a cup of raw Pecans to the food processor and continued as directed on the recipe. It was perfect. So since I love to experiment, I’m making my second loaf with walnuts instead of pecans. It’s rising and looking beautiful. I can’t wait to try it.


I am BLOWN away by this bread! I added up the protein and net carbs … umm … WOW. A huge bonus is that both kids – one of whom is crazy picky – AND my husband both love it!!!! They devoured the first loaf within a few hours. This will obviously be a huge staple in our house. It’s really a God-send. Our son, who is the picky eater, is mostly picky about proteins. He won’t eat any meat except for chicken, no eggs or dairy. We’ve gone gluten/casein free to see if it helps with his autism and as much as I totally wanted to eliminate bread, I finally just had to accept that he HAD to eat a peanut butter and honey sandwich at lunch. My cracker/veggie/peanut butter dip thing just wasn’t working. Not only will he EAT this bread – he wouldn’t eat the other gluten-free breads I was making – it is actually giving him the ONE thing he needs most – PROTEIN. Seriously, thank you, thank you, thank you!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Ok, I did mine a little different. I can’t eat the almond flour so I substituted non glutton Oat flour and I also added chia seeds. I wasn’t able to get the right sized pan, mine is the larger one, so I noticed that the bread wasn’t going to be very high, so …. I made another batch of bread, added it to the lower layer and cooked. Oh wow!! So good!! But I can’t eat it all at once. Poo! Anyway, don’t be afraid to use the bigger pan, just double the recipe.
Cancer: Disease of Civilization? An anthropological and historical study by Vilhjalmur Stefansson. This classic shows what happens before and after tribes were "civilized." Covers day-to-day experience of Eskimo life. Published in 1960. Used copies are available at a steep price. To read it get it on inter-library loan. Another of his many books My Life with the Eskimo (New Edition) is available.
The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living: An Expert Guide to Making the Life-Saving Benefits of Carbohydrate Restriction Sustainable and Enjoyable by Stephen D. Phinney and Jeff S. Volek synthesizes the science into one readable source. The book is excellent for general low-carb high-fat moderate protein diets. While they begin with the idea that we should eat like a caveman, they do not follow the conclusion to its logical end and have us avoid the classes of foods our ancestors would have found unrecognizable. They avoid the metobolic syndrome, but not the autoimmune diseases. They mention that monosaturates should be favored, though they are not emphasized in the menu example. The book's daily menu examples also all include dairy in one form or another. No tips are given tips for those who do not do dairy. Published May 19, 2011. The Amazon reviews average to 4+.
I know that soy can cause inflammation and if you are not using soy free eggs, that could be part of the cause. It may not be the actual egg but the soy that is the problem. just a thought. Here is an article that has some interesting info on soy. http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/07/29/soy-effects-on-women.aspx?e_cid=20120729_SNL_Art_1
This is my second time making this bread! First time I didn’t use golden flaxseed meal so the color was little darker ( and I didn’t like the one I got from Trader Joe’s ) . Second time I used Bob’s golden flaxseed meal and color and flavor was much better!!! But both time it didn’t rise like your bread. My yeast was nice and bubbly. Only thing I can think of is my Psyllium Husk was whole not power. Does that make a difference? I did grind it up but it wasn’t powder like. Another thing I read in the other comments was the kitchen not being warm enough. I don’t think my kitchen wasn’t warm enough so next time I’ll try it on top of my oven!
Fruits are not only delicious, but they’re also great for you. That said, fruits (even paleo-approved ones) contain large amounts of fructose which, while much better than HFCS (high-fructose corn syrup), is still sugar. If you’re looking to lose weight on the paleo diet, you’ll want to cut back on your fruit intake and focus more on the vegetables allowed on the paleo diet. However, feel free to have one to three servings of fruit a day. Check out this list of paleo diet fruits and see if you’re not hungry by the end! (We’ll admit, we’re partial to blackberries!)
Hey Maya!! This is the 2nd recipe I’ve tried off your website and again I love it!! Turned out really well. I can have sandwiches again or a quick piece Of toast when I’m in a hurry to get out the door. I was skeptical about the xanthan gum since I tried a recipe using psyllium husk powder. I did not like it. I can’t taste the xanthan gum so I have no problem using it going forward. Thanks again for the recipe!!!

Alyssa, one more thing. Both the bowl and the beaters need to be spotlessly clean. If there is one hint of oil anywhere the whites will not beat properly. Nicole is correct about not using a plastic bowl. Plastic will even absorb oil to say nothing of the microscopic amounts that get into the surface when it’s scratched. When baking it is always best to use a metal or glass bowl for all of your mixing.
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