We love nuts and they are decidedly paleo diet friendly. Be careful though, as cashews are high in fat and, for some reason, it’s incredibly easy to eat an entire jar of them in one sitting (that’s not just us, is it?). If you’re trying to lose weight, limit the amount of nuts you’re consuming. Otherwise, have at it. I mean, you can’t beat a good almond/pecan/walnut mix, can you?
Ok, I did mine a little different. I can’t eat the almond flour so I substituted non glutton Oat flour and I also added chia seeds. I wasn’t able to get the right sized pan, mine is the larger one, so I noticed that the bread wasn’t going to be very high, so …. I made another batch of bread, added it to the lower layer and cooked. Oh wow!! So good!! But I can’t eat it all at once. Poo! Anyway, don’t be afraid to use the bigger pan, just double the recipe.
I would like to try this Paleo recipe as it really does look like a healthy one! We appreciate all your hard work “tweaking” these recipes to get them just right! However, I would like to comment that some of your recipe “supporters” live in Canada and we can’t get some of the brand named items you mention at times. Perhaps for this reason some have asked re substitutions. As an example, I made your Chocolate Prune Bars the other day but wasn’t sure about the NuNaturals Stevia. I didn’t know whether it was a powder or a liquid, and since we don’t have that brand here I took a “leap in the dark” and used SweetLeaf Vanilla Creme since there was vanilla in the recipe anyway. I’m sure yours turned out better than mine but I’m going to try again. Also, wasn’t sure whether the chocolate chips were semi-sweet or unsweetened, but just used what I had, which was bittersweet. I guess that item is pretty well a personal choice. Just thought I would let you know that we do have some different brand names in Canada which can sometimes confuse the issue.
Hi Jodi, I haven’t tried that, but don’t think it would work well for this recipe. First, yeast needs sugar (for it to consume – it’s not typically in the end result), so you’d need to add that. But also, just with how we are making the bread fluffy with beaten egg whites, I don’t think yeast would work. If you want to try adding yeast to a low carb bread, I would do it with this low carb bread recipe instead.
But critics argue that the unlimited amount of red meat the paleo diet allows may have an adverse effect on heart health in people with diabetes, as research links eating red meat in excess to poor heart health. (11)  If you have diabetes and don’t moderate your red-meat intake, this could be a big problem, as people with diabetes are 2 times as likely to die of heart disease as people who do not have diabetes. (12)
Thank you Elena! I Used a 500g William Sonoma non-stick loaf pan (a tad larger than suggested) and ground whole brown flax seeds in my spice grinder because I had them on hand in the freezer. Also, mixed in a small amount of unblanched almond flour with the blancheds because I had some to use up and used my grandmother’s old manual hand mixer rather than a food processor (don’t own one). My apartment smelled absolutely delicious when this was baking… nutty, earthy, eggy… I suspect the addition of the unblanched flour and regular flax deepened the color and flavor of the final product. It doesn’t look at all like your bread but rather has a deep brown multigrain look and cracked top. Even took some pictures. Very happy with this one. Easy, tasty, and so much better looking and tasting than most gf bread I’ve had. Texture is consistent all the way through and slices beautifully. I’ve sworn off the stuff but this wholesome paleo-friendly loaf has me sold. Can’t wait to try it on a sandwich tomorrow. So sick of salads for lunch. BTW tried the rosemary crackers last week and they were fantastic as well.
Sounds like your baking soda is old and/or spoiled. It explains the lack of rise, tingling tongue, chemical taste (washing soda [sodium carbonate, I think] is made by heating baking soda [sodium bicarbonate] in big ovens), and maybe the extra salty flavor, too. I’ve had bad baking soda spoil baked goods, and it’s a real bummer. Hope you try again, though.
Elana – I would love it if you would share more of your cooking notes with your readers. I think it would really help those of us who need or want to experiment with ingredients and/or quantities. For instance, I made this bread and find it too “eggy” so I might try it again with one fewer egg. If I knew more about your process it could help mine. Thanks for all of your hard work! I get frustrated with one bad cooking experiment — you do it for a living!

Thank you for another amazing recipe, Elana! I am thrilled to find delicious recipes that support a healthy lifestyle, and that I can share with family and friends. Your cookbooks are a staple in our house and your blog is a gift to me. I am looking forward to trying some of your great breakfast ideas to start to school year off right. Thanks for sharing the fruit of your efforts. :)
I was told by someone.I offered these to that they remknded her of a “sweet hawaiin roll”(i made them in square brownie compartment pans) so i played with recipe and used a coarser fround almond meal and added aome ground flax seed for.a heartier, “grainier”texture. I also replaced the tapioca with arrowroot for less.sweetness and used avocado oil in place of coconut oil. The result? An amazing “multigrain” knockoff!

My substitutions were coconut flour instead of arrowroot and honey for maple syrup AND regular gluten free flour instead of almond flour….some almond flour but not all. I also used 3 large eggs instead of 4 medium ones. With saying all of that I had to put more liquid in..it was too dense. Coconut flour needs more liquid. The bread tastes great but it’s too dense and didn’the rIse enough. Did the maple syrup vs honey or lack of one egg have anything to do with that density? I also don’the like the sweet taste in bread. Don’t eat any sugar so I am probably super sensitive to that taste. Your thoughts on the density, not rising enough and 3 large eggs vs 4 medium ones, in terms of making the bread rise more? Also would like a harder seeded bread. Do u have a recipe for that? I like hard breads. The taste is very good but not for breakfast or sandwiches. Not for me at any rate. Any suggestions? Thanks for ur help!
No background science here or lengthy explanations, only 15 easy guidelines to follow to kick-start your Paleo journey. It’s up to you to decide to what extent you want to follow those guidelines, but if you follow them 100% you can be assured that you are eating the best food for your body and greatly investing in your long term health and well-being.
One common lament about those deciding to go on the Paleo diet is having to give up bread. But just because you can’t eat what and grains anymore doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy nice slice of bread or two, just as long as it conforms to the Paleo dietary recommendations. Here is our select list of Paleo-friendly breads that you can use for sandwiches, toast, or just to enjoy on their own.
Paleo eating lends itself to sandwiches, but many Paleo dieters go without because they think they can’t have bread. But with this bread specifically made to accommodate a sandwich, you can’t go wrong. Just make sure your sandwich is piled high with meat and vegetables, the two staples of the Paleo method of eating. The ingredients list on this bread is amazing, with real wholesome ingredients, and nothing artificial used. Coconut flour gets the call as the wheat replacement, and there’s even flax used so you’re getting a dose of omega-3s.
Rick, Yes, I would try baking it longer if it’s coming out gummy. If it’s starting to brown too much outside, but the inside doesn’t seem to be fully cooked, you could cover it with foil to prevent over-browning. Another trick I sometimes use is to leave the bread in the oven to cool once it’s done baking (sometimes covering the loaf with foil to prevent over-browning). I hope these tips help!
For instance, the fat allowance of the diet may be problematic. “My biggest hang-up with the paleo diet is all of the saturated fats it promotes with all of the meats,” explains Holley, noting that you could look for a locally sourced meat, whose origin and method of raising you're aware of, as a healthier option. Saturated fat from meat has been linked with an increased risk of early death. (9)
Vinegar might seem like an odd ingredient for bread, but in this recipe, it's an important one! There's baking soda in this recipe, and in order for it to work properly, it needs an acid. That's where the vinegar comes in. No acid = no lift, so we want to make sure we've got something acidic in the dough to put that baking soda to work. If you don't have vinegar on hand, try lemon juice!

Ostensibly, Grok is "a rather typical hunter–gatherer" living before the dawn of agriculture—an "official primal prototype." He is the poster-persona for fitness author and blogger Mark Sisson's "Primal Blueprint"—a set of guidelines that "allows you to control how your genes express themselves in order to build the strongest, leanest, healthiest body possible, taking clues from evolutionary biology (that's the primal part)." These guidelines incorporate many principles of what is more commonly known as the Paleolithic, or caveman, diet, which started to whet people's appetites as early as the 1960s and is available in many different flavors today.


Gluten is a protein found in things like rye, wheat, and barley. It’s now being said that much of our population may be gluten-intolerant (hence all the new “gluten-free!” items popping up everywhere).  Over time, those who are gluten intolerant can develop a dismal array of medical conditions from consuming gluten: dermatitis, joint pain, reproductive problems, acid reflux, and more.[2]
Shandeline, if you use a larger size pan than I indicate for the recipe, your batter won’t fill it up and your loaf will be flat. An example is if you fill a 1/2 cup with 1/2 cup of water, the water comes to the top of the cup, if you transfer that 1/2 cup of water to a 1 cup measuring cup, it will only fill it halfway. That’s what’s happening to the bread when the pan used it too large. I’m so glad that the bread tasted wonderful!
A few days ago I was delighted to learn that Dr. Oz was going to again feature The Paleo Diet on his nationally syndicated television show along with one of my co-authors, Nell Stephenson, of The Paleo Diet Cookbook. I tuned into the Dr. Oz show and was happy about most of what I saw except for Chris Kresser, expounding upon the health virtues of a food group, beans and legumes, that definitely are not Paleo. Please read the following...
Hello, this bread recipe looks great, and I really want to make it for my dad who is intolerant to gluten and must settle with the sad and tiny store bought gluten free loaves. However, the only bread pan I have is one inch larger in dimensions, do you recommend increasing the recipe? Like doubling it or using 1.5 times the ingredients? Thank you :)
I am so looking for breads that work……….this does not……I have your books………..but the question about the ammonia…….they are an in your face issue…………for me, not till I sliced the loaf……but my nose is very sensitive….and I taste the amonia without ingesting the product…………my Mum, who has no sense of smell left, loved it…….. time to keep trying…………I am borderline diabetic, mum is, and my lover is in denial……………..so looking for something that passes as ‘bread’…………..thanks for the help………….luckylin……….
Hahaha! Demeter – I so so know what you mean about that almond butter grease that gets EVERYWHERE and, like you said, refuses”to let go of its dish territory” I still love making my own almond butter (mostly cos it doesn’t cost me a kidney and an arm) when I have the time – lately time has been in short supply for me – also in short supply are treats as decadent as these! You sure are a good almond-butter-making-maniac-sister to keep your sisters supplied with treats like these bars – though in the unlikely event that you end up with more of these bars than they are willing to take off your hands – well, I’d be delighted to help out! Just saying 😉
I notice that you call for Celtic sea salt in your recipes – any particular reason why you call for that over other kinds of salt – i.e., regular table salt, kosher salt, or other types of sea salts? I ask because I don’t have this particular salt at home, but have others, and don’t want to ruin the recipe(s) if the measurement conversions are different for fine ground vs. coarse, for instance….
I just made the paleo sandwich rolls, I was out of palm shortening so I used coconut oil. I also did not have applesauce on had and had notice someone had used cottage cheese — so I did. Baked it in an 8×8 glass pan. They just came out and cooled. I cut in to 4’s and sliced through the middle. I have to say they were a bit oily (maybe because of the coconut oil) but I chopped a bit off one and tasted it yum!! I put them in the fridge, can’t wait for my BLT tomorrow 🙂

According to Adrienne Rose Johnson, the idea that the primitive diet was superior to current dietary habits dates back to the 1890s with such writers as Dr. Emmet Densmore and Dr. John Harvey Kellogg. Densmore proclaimed that "bread is the staff of death," while Kellogg supported a diet of starchy and grain-based foods.[11] The idea of a Paleolithic diet can be traced to a 1975 book by gastroenterologist Walter Voegtlin,[7]:41 which in 1985 was further developed by Stanley Boyd Eaton and Melvin Konner, and popularized by Loren Cordain in his 2002 book The Paleo Diet.[8] The terms caveman diet and stone-age diet are also used,[12] as is Paleo Diet, trademarked by Cordain.[13]
Whenever I come across a recipe and I want to convert it to grams I use the amount on say my bag of almond flour and calculate it out. My almond flour weighs out to be 112 grams per cup so for this recipe you would use 224 grams of almond flour (I use superfine Kirkland brand from Costco and I’ve also used Bob’s Red Mill superfine and they both work equally well). The 2 tablespoons of coconut flour is a small amount so I wouldn’t bother weighing that out. As for the flax seed, I buy mine whole and measure accordingly and grind in my coffee grinder. 

If you were to eat an unlimited amount of red meat (which the paleo diet technically allows), you may see your heart health suffer. While experts applaud the omission of packaged and processed foods like cake, cookies, chips, and candy — which are well known to be bad for your ticker — they’re not crazy about the fact that paleo doesn’t allow you to eat whole grains, legumes, and most dairy. Whole grains in particular have been linked with better cholesterol levels, as well as a reduced risk of stroke, obesity, and type 2 diabetes. (13) These are all comorbidities of heart disease. (14)

Hi I am new to the grain free diet and I love this bread. Has anyone figured out the calorie count for it? I have been gluten free since 2003 and it has served me well, although I think that I could benefit from grain free. But like all diet changes that I have tried in the past I tend to gain weight if I do not know the calorie count of the new recipes. Thanks.
We made the mix as directed. We then mixed 1/2 cup coconut sugar and 1 Tablespoon cinnamon in a separate container. Pour 1/2 of the bread mix in the pan, followed by 1/2 of the cinnamon/sugar mix. Then put the rest of the bread mix in the pan and cover with the rest of the cinnamon/sugar mix. Then swirl with a knife. Great bread for having with stew or soup!
This is my second time making this bread! First time I didn’t use golden flaxseed meal so the color was little darker ( and I didn’t like the one I got from Trader Joe’s ) . Second time I used Bob’s golden flaxseed meal and color and flavor was much better!!! But both time it didn’t rise like your bread. My yeast was nice and bubbly. Only thing I can think of is my Psyllium Husk was whole not power. Does that make a difference? I did grind it up but it wasn’t powder like. Another thing I read in the other comments was the kitchen not being warm enough. I don’t think my kitchen wasn’t warm enough so next time I’ll try it on top of my oven!
Deepika, It’s hard to tell exactly where the discrepancy occurred without being in the kitchen with you, but I can try to help. There is (surprisingly) quite a bit of variance between different brands, so if you used a different brand for almond flour, coconut flour, etc. that could have been a contributing factor. Also, was your ghee or coconut oil melted like the recipe says? Out of curiosity, how did the recipe turn out?

Hi Erma, to keep my recipes grain-free you can substitute sunflower or pumpkin seed flour for the almond flour cup for cup. The taste is a little different but you may still really like it. These seed flour may be hard to find so you can make your own and the process is the same for making almond flour. I have a tutorial here: https://livinghealthywithchocolate.com/desserts/how-to-blanch-almonds-and-make-almond-flour-8387/

Thanks so much for the link love, dear Elana! I’m so, so happy you are enjoying our bees’ honey! :-) I’ve been making a similar paleo bread of late, but mine doesn’t contain coconut flour or ACV. I’m intrigued with your variations, but more importantly I know it’s good as you have just posted this recipe and I’ve already seen folks reference it in their posts! Now that’s a stellar recommendation, my friend! ;-)


Paleoista: Gain Energy, Get Lean, and Feel Fabulous With the Diet You Were Born to Eat by Nell Stephenson. Paleoista is not only a how-to book, it is also a glimpse into the life of a woman who gives advice on how to eat this way, and lives the life, day in and day out. The author's websites: NellStephenson.com Nutrition & Fitness and Paleoista.com. To be published May 1, 2012.
I was very skeptical about this recipe. But I tell you what, I was pleasantly surprised when I ate one, thick with butter. I think one could describe them as close to what we call in New Zealand, ‘scones,’ but not sure what you call scones in the US is the same thing as here. Seeing as I haven’t had a scone in such a long time it was a treat. I don’t think I would use this recipe for buns though.

Our ancestors didn't chase cows and chickens around in the wild. They hunted game, antelopes, buffalo, and probably some animals we've never heard of that are long extinct. Their meat was generally quite lean, and provided more healthy omega 3s than meats from modern day animals, even the grass-fed ones, according to Dr. Katz. Many of the plants that thrived back then are also extinct today, making it impossible to truly follow their meal plan, he says.


I made this bread and really do like it~ we are paleo and needed a good bread recipe. What I am wondering is how the picture you have of this bread is so light and yellow colored? After making it, the bread is dark and even has a green tint to it over time. The texture and taste are both perfect, but it doesn’t look appetizing~ trying to figure out how mine looks so different than the picture of your bread. I noticed that the pictures other people posted also showed dark bread as well. I used all of the recommended ingredients exactly- but it does not come out light or yellowy. Any recommendations?

Diana Schwarzbein is another M.D. that has come to realize that low carb is what works. See reviews at The Schwarzbein Principle. The book is based on her work with insulin-resistant patients with Type II diabetes. She concludes that low-fat diets cause heart attacks, eating fat makes you lose body fat, and it's important to eat high-cholesterol foods every day.


How inventive!! Elana, we would love for you to share this wonderful recipe with our community since I know our Paleo/Primal friends will just love this. If you’re interested, please take a minute to submit the recipe at fastpaleo.com/upload-a-recipe/. Feel free to plug your blog at the beginning of the directions section, and we’re more than happy to give your Facebook page a shoutout when we post it! This is exactly the kind of delicious and healthy recipe people are asking for!
Dessert is the hardest bad habit to break when you commit to a new and improved healthy eating resolution. The good news is that there are SO many natural alternatives, you can easily hack a way to #TreatYoSelf to your favorite sweets. We’ve seen healthy bean desserts become all the rage, and most of them are refined sugar-free and Paleo-friendly. Since chocolate is everyone’s go-to treat of choice, healthy chocolate recipes are also quite coveted in the diet world. Lucky for you, we dug up 18 Paleo chocolate desserts that are so indulgent, you won’t believe they’re secretly good for you.
One common lament about those deciding to go on the Paleo diet is having to give up bread. But just because you can’t eat what and grains anymore doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy nice slice of bread or two, just as long as it conforms to the Paleo dietary recommendations. Here is our select list of Paleo-friendly breads that you can use for sandwiches, toast, or just to enjoy on their own.
This was delicious! my husband and children (2, 4, and 6) all loved it as well! We sliced it and ate as is. I used bobs red mill almond flour since that’s all I can get here in Canada so I’m sure the texture was a bit coarser than when using honeyville, but nonetheless one of the tastiest and easiest grain free breads I’ve made! Thanks for sharing!
New here, but loving your recipees so far (totally game changer for my diet and life)! I’ve tried this bread a few times now, but am struggling with it a little bit and was hoping that you could help me try to figure out what to try next. The taste is fantastic, but I’m having trouble with the rise. My yeast is bubbling and I’ve had it proving on my oven (which is pretty hot! –too hot?). The structure inside looks like there were air bubbles, but they got knocked out or something (sort of squished), but your picture looks incredible so I’m hoping that I can change something. The taste seems a little dense and chewy so far. I’m very new to baking, so it might also be a bake problem. I’m in Chicago.

I’m excited to hear that! If I have a chance to do any recipe testing myself, I will let you know if I come up with anything worthwhile . . .Staying tuned and looking forward to it! Is there any way for me to be notified of your replies to my comment(s)? I had to come back to this page to see this, so just wondering (and I do have the box clicked about “notify me of follow-up comments by email”). Thanks again!
OMG…Could your FABULOUS coconut palm syrup/recipe be used/considered as the ultra-expensive COCONUT NECTAR?..If so…this is sheer BRILLIANCE as it has provided a needed “Eureka” moment for me in my quest for a low glycemic substitute for agave or honey..Is the resulting syrup suitable for use in this fashion in baking?…Thank you so much for contributing your wonderful idea.
Paloa, my dear woman! You need to be recognized as a saint! I just made this bread and holy smokes. It. Is. Awesome! I will make a few tweaks the next time I bake it – I baked it for high altitude (I’m at 5800 ft) but apparently my oven is on steroids – it was to hot and the top was over brown – I checked it about 20 min in and it was already dark. But, I have a plan for next time. When I pulled it out of the pan, a corner came off – which was great because I didn’t have to wait to try it! I’ve also tried your chocolate sour cream cupcakes and the cream cheese frosting this week – holy smokes they are delicious! I’m so glad I found you and can’t thank you enough for sharing your knowledge and recipes with all of us! Have a great week! –Rena
Hi Sally, thanks for your comment and kind words. I mostly bake with almond flour and coconut flour because they are much lower carb than other gluten-free flours. Unfortunately, I don’t think they are elastic enough to make pita bread. When we have falafel and other foods that are typically served with some type of bread product, I serve in a lettuce wrap which takes next to no time to prepare, is low carb, and very healthy. Sorry I can’t be of more help!
Experts estimate that our ancestors consumed a one-to-one ratio of calories from meats to produce. Since you have to eat a lot of salad to consume the same amount of calories in a steak, the paleo diet should ideally include mostly fruits and vegetables, Katz says. However, many people don't realize that and eat too much meat. Consuming excess protein and not enough carbs can cause kidney damage and also increase your risk of osteoporosis, Dr. Ochner says. Plus, since most of today's meats are higher in saturated fat than those of yesteryear, it can increase the risk of heart disease, Dr. Katz says.
When eating Paleo you may find that you end up using vegan recipes a lot. This is not surprising because vegan cooking entails cutting out a lot of junk and only using wholesome sources. Of course you’ll be ruining the vegan-ness of it with the meat you’ll be having with it, but for side items like bread it’s totally OK to borrow a page from the vegan notebook. Here we have a bread that is both Paleo and vegan approved, and uses a bit of applesauce to give it a unique flavor. One thing to remember is that vegan cheese substitutes that you can find at the store will typically be Paleo friendly and actually taste pretty good.
Some randomized controlled trials have shown the Paleo diet to produce greater short-term benefits than diets based on national nutrition guidelines, including greater weight loss, reduced waist circumference, decreased blood pressure, increased insulin sensitivity, and improved cholesterol. However these studies were of short duration (6 months or less) with a small number of participants (less than 40). [4-6]
Thanks Kaylie. I used the ingredients I had at hand so that is why I did what I did. Can I eliminate the maple syrup without loosing something? Don’t like the sweet taste. I will try the other recipe first and let you know how I make out. Thanks for getting back to me. We need everyone’s expertise. Glad you like my adventurous spirit….making mistakes is just so much fun!!! :^) 
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