In making the case for meat, Cordain presents anecdotal evidence of Eskimos who lived their full life without a heart attack. The Eskimo diet consists of 97% meat, which he concedes causes all Eskimos to develop atherosclerosis—a common precursor to heart disease. But Cordain says Eskimos never die of heart disease. He discusses one Eskimo who lived 45 years and another who lived 53 years, both without heart disease! He then jumps to the conclusion that because these Eskimos didn’t get heart attacks, even with severe atherosclerosis, meat must have protected them from heart disease. So Cordain’s best case for lots of meat is that you can live to the ripe age of 45 or even 53 without a heart attack. But do people—even unhealthy smokers or the obese—generally get heart attacks before age 53?

I am so happy that I found your site! I have been trying for a couple years to find a good bread/roll recipe (I’m kind of picky) and this is the first one that I have absolutely loved. My kids love them too. I am going to order the molds you use but for now am making them in a muffin pan and they turn out great. So far I’ve used them with tuna salad and your sloppy joe recipe (which is also delicious! )


I know that soy can cause inflammation and if you are not using soy free eggs, that could be part of the cause. It may not be the actual egg but the soy that is the problem. just a thought. Here is an article that has some interesting info on soy. http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/07/29/soy-effects-on-women.aspx?e_cid=20120729_SNL_Art_1


Made it last night and my husband & I ate the whole loaf! I used olive oil instead of palm oil, and I used arrowroot instead of tapioca flour. Also, I baked for 22min in a mini-loaf pan and let it cool for 15-20min before slicing. I got 8 small slices and they were delicious! Very fluffy and raised nicely during baking. The texture was extremely fluffy and just like any sandwich roll as you’d expect.
A number of randomized clinical trials have compared the paleo diet to other eating plans, such as the Mediterranean Diet or the Diabetes Diet. Overall, these trials suggest that a paleo diet may provide some benefits when compared with diets of fruits, vegetables, lean meats, whole grains, legumes and low-fat dairy products. These benefits may include:
In the long term, you have to be sure you’re getting calcium and other nutrients you’re missing by not having dairy products and certain grains. Some paleo-approved foods, such as salmon and spinach, contain calcium, so you have to be sure you’re including them in your diet. It would be a good idea to check with a registered dietitian, too, to make sure you’re meeting your calcium and other nutrient needs.
Excluding foods. The exclusion of entire categories of commonly eaten foods like whole grains and dairy requires frequent label reading in the supermarket and in restaurants. It may also increase the risk of deficiencies such as calcium, vitamin D, and B vitamins, if these nutrients are not consistently eaten from the allowed foods or a vitamin supplement. For example, there are some nondairy calcium-rich foods that are absorbed well by the body such as collard and turnip greens or canned bone-in sardines and salmon, but you would have to eat five or more servings of these greens and fish bones daily to meet recommended calcium needs. (Note that some greens like spinach that are touted to be calcium-rich also contain oxalates and phytates that bind to calcium so very little is actually absorbed.) One small, short-term intervention study of healthy participants showed a 53% decrease from baseline in calcium intake after following a Paleo diet for three weeks. [8] Furthermore, the exclusion of whole grains can result in reduced consumption of beneficial nutrients such as fiber and thus may increase one’s risk for diabetes and heart disease.
“I think there are a lot of positives about it,” Holley says. “It cuts out a lot of processed foods just naturally, like processed grains or added sugar through soft drinks or juice.” And because the diet promotes eating anti-inflammatory foods — like fruits, vegetables, and unsaturated fats in nuts and certain oils — your health could benefit, Holley explains. Cutting out processed foods and sugar will also help lower your risk of certain diseases, like type 2 diabetes and certain cancers, she says. (6)
Thank you for another amazing recipe, Elana! I am thrilled to find delicious recipes that support a healthy lifestyle, and that I can share with family and friends. Your cookbooks are a staple in our house and your blog is a gift to me. I am looking forward to trying some of your great breakfast ideas to start to school year off right. Thanks for sharing the fruit of your efforts. :)

I made the dinner rolls today and the recipe worked great. I lightly greased a muffin pan, used a scant half cup of batter for each roll, baked for 15-18 minutes and they are perfect for holiday dinners. My yeild was 13 rolls. Good thing there was extra, because I ate one hot from the oven. I also used coconut vinegar and coconut nectar instead of apple cider vinegar and honey. Yum, Yum, Yum
These are AMAZING! I have celiac and was diagnosed about 4 months ago. It’s been very difficult and bread is what I miss most. Unfortunately, GF bread is not very tasty-i’ve tried a number of brands and have tried making my own. I love the simplicity of the recipe as well. Thank you for creating amazing clean recipes, your cookie bars are also fabulous!
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