hi – thanks for the recipe…we LOVE all your recipes in your books and blogs..and we are a Paleo and dairy free..Paleo my husband and son HAS to because of dairy intolerance. I would like to mention that those following a strict Paleo diet need to omit the Flax. Flax is not a paleo ingredient as it is a cultivated grain. I have omitted the flax in your recipes when called for and you never miss it. Thanks again for all of your hardwork and recipes!!!
Hi Jen, It sounds like it needed to bake for longer – this is why it sunk and was still moist. The timing varies by ovens and even different pans. I hope you’ll try it again and just keep it in there for longer. You can cover the top if it starts to brown too much. For the one you made, depending on how moist it was in the middle, you may be able to salvage it somewhat by pan frying the slices.
I made it tonight and use a mini loaf pan. It came out delicious. I used the http://www.tasteofhome.com/article/how-to-cut-down-recipes/ link to adjust the recipe measurements using the one third column. I used 2 egg whites. The slices will be small but it was delicious with melted butter. Keto bread recipes and I have tried quite a few have not turned out well for me. I do not like to waste expensive ingredients that is why I will usually do a small amount first. This recipe has been the exception. It is good simple and delicious. I will make it again using the recipe as written. Note: I whipped the egg whites for 10 minutes to get the right consistency. I hope this helps and thank You Maya for finally for me making a bread that tastes great and is easy to make.
Hi Jen, It sounds like it needed to bake for longer – this is why it sunk and was still moist. The timing varies by ovens and even different pans. I hope you’ll try it again and just keep it in there for longer. You can cover the top if it starts to brown too much. For the one you made, depending on how moist it was in the middle, you may be able to salvage it somewhat by pan frying the slices.
I made you Paleo Bread today. It was YUMMY with my grass-fed Beef Vegetable Soup. I didn’t change one thing (except I only had a 8.5×4-inch glass loaf pan–my smallest). It turned out great. It did stick a little on the very center bottom. I think I may have been a little anxious to get it out of the pan, but your suggested pan would be a much better choice.
I just made it using all the the optional ingredients but I didn’t have a food processor so I whipped/mixed everything by hand. One thing I noticed is that the top of the bread cracked unevenly. Could I have over fluffed the egg whites? Maybe creating an artificial cut in the middle could solve that next time? It rose very well and nearly doubled in size, though the size is still a bit small for my liking. I will most likely use 1.5x the amount next time. It smells great and I’m about to chow down on this!
They go through a virtual checklist on what makes a bread a bread, and it’s pretty much right on. You want your bread to be able to toast up in the toaster, to have a crust on the outside but be soft on the inside, and to slice up without giving you too many problems. The reason this becomes important to consider is because many breads that try to cut out wheat and up falling short of many of these requirements. But this bread is up to the challenge and can be that go-to bread recipe you’ll need while going with the Paleo lifestyle.
I’m so sorry your bread crumbles, that’s so disappointing. That your dough didn’t become a firm ball indicates that a measurement might have been off. My best recommendations for baking grain-free include having all ingredients at room temperature, have the oven preheated, to measure everything accurately and to notice if things are happening the way they are supposed to, ie.: your dough is not firm. A soft dough would need you to add more flour to it, although if the dough is too soft because too much milk or fat was added, it will throw off the balance of everything else. Baking is very precise in this way, try it again and keep me posted on the outcome.
I make three loaves of Paleo 2.0 bread and Paleo Rye bread every two weeks and they both freeze well. Thanks for these recipes. All of our children and grandchildren love them. We are moving from Illinois to Colorado Springs and are worried that the high altitude will create problems. Hoping that we will find by testing how to recreate these delicious breads.
Maya, this is a beautiful looking bread. I’m going to try it, but before I do, I’d like to know if you have ever tried doubling the recipe. It seems that it would work–based on the fact that my almond flour bread that I have made for years uses 3 1/4 cups flour, and turns out pretty well. (I’m pretty content with my recipe, but admit that yours looks better due to the whiteness and it appears to have more air bubbles, indicating it’s probably lighter.) If I don’t hear from you, I’ll probably go ahead and double it, and use a 9×5 pan–wish me luck.
Ana, We like using a combination of almond flour and coconut flour for this bread to achieve the best flavor and texture. We haven’t tried this bread using only coconut flour, but it may work. Coconut flour absorbs liquid differently, so you’ll want to use about 1/4 the amount of coconut flour as almond flour (since the recipe calls for 2 cups almond flour, that would be 1/2 cup coconut flour in addition to the 3/4 cup coconut flour that the recipe already calls for). However, the flavor and texture of this bread will likely be different with that substitution. Please let us know how it goes if you give it a try!

Success! My very first attempt at baking “paleo”. This is very tasty and so very easy. I used the recipe with honey and coconut oil. I recently shifted my diet to low carb and no sugar, and really needed a bread that fit the new diet. This is perfect. THANK YOU for sharing the years of experience and knowledge you have with cooking Paleo. I think the size of the pan is very important to get a rise out of the mixture, so folks just follow this fool proof recipe and enjoy. I bought your recent book, Paleo Cooking, on iTunes so it is easy to have the recipe at my fingertip on my phone right there in the kitchen.
Some Paleo dieters emphasize that they never believed in one true caveman lifestyle or diet and that—in the fashion of Sisson's Blueprint—they use our evolutionary past to form guidelines, not scripture. That strategy seems reasonably solid at first, but quickly disintegrates. Even though researchers know enough to make some generalizations about human diets in the Paleolithic with reasonable certainty, the details remain murky. Exactly what proportions of meat and vegetables did different hominid species eat in the Paleolithic? It's not clear. Just how far back were our ancestors eating grains and dairy? Perhaps far earlier than we initially thought. What we can say for certain is that in the Paleolithic, the human diet varied immensely by geography, season and opportunity. "We now know that humans have evolved not to subsist on a single, Paleolithic diet but to be flexible eaters, an insight that has important implications for the current debate over what people today should eat in order to be healthy," anthropologist William Leonard of Northwestern University wrote in Scientific American in 2002.
But the Paleo diet bans more than just highly processed junk foods—in its most traditional form, it prohibits any kind of food unavailable to stone age hunter–gatherers, including dairy rich in calcium, grains replete with fiber, and vitamins and legumes packed with protein. The rationale for such constraint—in fact the entire premise of the Paleo diet—is, at best, only half correct. Because the human body adapted to life in the stone age, Paleo dieters argue—and because our genetics and anatomy have changed very little since then, they say—we should emulate the diets of our Paleo predecessors as closely as possible in order to be healthy. Obesity, heart disease, diabetes, cancer and many other "modern" diseases, the reasoning goes, result primarily from the incompatibility of our stone age anatomy with our contemporary way of eating.
Eat WELL Feel GOOD: Practical Paleo Living by Diane Frampton has over 200 recipes that makes paleo eating simple, delicious, and ultimately, intuitive. So they claim. There are only a few reviews at Amazon. They all like the book, but their lack of details makes it appear that they are not truly independent reviews. The recipes have a Crossfit appeal to them. Chef Rachel Albert has made some of the recipes and posted here [archive.org].
Sometimes you don’t need a loaf of bread, and you just need enough for yourself to make a sandwich or to serve as a side to a hearty Paleo chili. This single serve recipe can easily be multiplied if needed, but it’s best when used as a one-serving bread when you don’t have the time, desire, or need for more than just enough for yourself. The way they’ve figure out how to make this Paleo friendly and ready to go in just a few minutes is impressive. It makes the perfect companion to all sorts of soups and stews, as the bookends to a sandwich, or as an accompaniment to eggs and bacon.
Hi Elana! I just found your website and I’m so glad that I did! I’ve been on a GF diet for about a month after having years of terrible GI problems. I can’t remember when I didn’t have GI issues, and have done a number of elimination diets to figure out the problem. I’ve visited a few gastroenterologists and they haven’t identified anything “wrong” with me. I still haven’t pinpointed it, but overall I feel happier knowing that I’ve omitted something that was such a big part of my life before. Your bread recipe was very much needed since I still have an affinity for bread-like (carb-y) foods. The bread is delicious and SO hearty. I was skeptical at first, but it turns out I’m hooked on the stuff! Unfortunately I didn’t have coconut flour, so I ended up using 2 T of GF flour, it still worked! I have a shipment coming soon and can’t wait to try it out with the CF! Thanks again, I look forward to reading more of your posts even though I’m not a paleo nut! ;)
It is interesting in gluten free baking how seemingly minute changes can have a big effect on the taste, texture, consistency and rise of the finished product. I thought it was just me that had such an enhanced palate (since I have Fibromyalgia, CFS, etc) my senses and nerves are forever enhanced. In my vanilla oat banana quick bread recipe I have found that variations in the type of pan etc will change the entire finished product. I have tried it in a large loaf pan, mini loaves and muffins. This recipe which I created works best as mini loaves. Just last week I made it and I used my nutri bullet instead of my food processor to ground the oat, corn meal and corn starch flour blend I created and it made for a very fine powder. This change in the texture of of the flour gave the bread a different texture. It was a slight change that only I would have noticed but I was going crazy trying to pinpoint what made the difference. I pinpointed that in order to get the rise and texture I prefer, I need to use mini loaf pans and pulse my blend in the food processor. I feel like these variations are part of all baking but pronounced in gf baking for sure.
^ Ramsden, C.; Faurot, K.; Carrera-Bastos, P.; Cordain, L.; De Lorgeril, M.; Sperling, L. (2009). "Dietary Fat Quality and Coronary Heart Disease Prevention: A Unified Theory Based on Evolutionary, Historical, Global, and Modern Perspectives". Current Treatment Options in Cardiovascular Medicine. 11 (4): 289–301. doi:10.1007/s11936-009-0030-8. PMID 19627662.
I didn’t have almond flour so substituted 1 cup millet flour and 1 cup sorghum flour for the almond flour, and baked in an 7.5″ x 4.5″ x 2.5″ loaf pan. The loaf was short, about 1.5″ tall, the texture was pleasantly dense and held together well. The taste, however, was pasty (like flour) and the bread was dry. (I noticed afterwards that the sorghum flour package said to substitute 15-20% sorghum flour in your recipe, so that may have affected the taste and dryness.) I tried a slice with a topping of honey, and that was pretty good, but not good enough. So I made croutons, which were delicious. I cut the bread into small cubes and spread them on a cookie sheet, sprayed them with olive oil spray and drizzled 1/2 stick of butter over them, then seasoned generously with Nature’s Seasonings and garlic powder (for a richer crouton, could also sprinkle with parmesan cheese). I tossed them to distribute the seasonings and baked them at 350 degrees about 20 minutes until crunchy. I’ll try the recipe again when I have almond flour.
I always wondered what the heck are the 7 layer bars ingredients that make the layers of these tasty bars. Turns out that regular Seven Layer Bars have a graham cracker crumb base and are topped with some combination of nuts, chocolate chips, white chocolate, butterscotch, and coconut.  All that is usually held together by sweetened condensed milk. If you’re thinking, “Oh my goodness, that’s a lot of sugar!” You’re right.  If you’re thinking, “Wow, that sounds amazing,” then you’re right as well!
This recipe is FANTASTIC! I think was my first attempt a time grain free bread and I hit the jackpot! No need to look farther. I followed another reader’s suggestion to beat egg whites separately then fold in at the end. I used Bob Mill’s super fine almond flour. Everything else I followed exactly as primed and cooked an extra 8 minutes for a total of 33 mins. THANK YOU SO MUCH for such an excellent recipe!
Ugh! It’s been an hour and it doesn’t look like my bread has hardly risen at all. I haven’t made any substitutions, my yeast was good, etc. I currently live in Italy, so it’s plenty warm here today. I’ve now warmed my oven up a bit, turned it off, and have the dough in there to see if I can get any kind of rise out of it before trying to cook. Fingers crossed!
Diet has been an important part of our evolution—as it is for every species—and we have inherited many adaptations from our Paleo predecessors. Understanding how we evolved could, in principle, help us make smarter dietary choices today. But the logic behind the Paleo diet fails in several ways: by making apotheosis of one particular slice of our evolutionary history; by insisting that we are biologically identical to stone age humans; and by denying the benefits of some of our more modern methods of eating.

“I think there are a lot of positives about it,” Holley says. “It cuts out a lot of processed foods just naturally, like processed grains or added sugar through soft drinks or juice.” And because the diet promotes eating anti-inflammatory foods — like fruits, vegetables, and unsaturated fats in nuts and certain oils — your health could benefit, Holley explains. Cutting out processed foods and sugar will also help lower your risk of certain diseases, like type 2 diabetes and certain cancers, she says. (6)

Thank you for sharing this recipe, I made them in a 8 inch square baking dish and cut into 4, which worked great! I just bought a muffin top pan today and will be using that to make a double batch this weekend! Taste and texture of these are amazing! Just what I needed for sandwiches to take to work! NOW, I’m intrigued and will be trying your other recipes! Thanks again 🙂


We have four of these separated, but I don’t know if they are oven safe. They have a little rubber, maybe silicone nobs on the end of the handles, but I’ve no idea if they can be used in the oven as they didn’t come in a package, they were bought separately and I am trying to find recipes for bread/buns that I can do that are quite easy and don’t require anything more than what I’ve already got.
Hi Sophie, I have found that the best almond flour for baking are the ones that have the skin removed (blanched) and are very finely ground. Some brands call it almond meal and some almond flour, so currently there’s no standard name. I have also found that not all brand work well. For example the Bobs Red Mill brand fails most of the time for baking. My personal favorite brands are by Honeyville and welbees. You may be able to order these from amazon.
Deepika, It’s hard to tell exactly where the discrepancy occurred without being in the kitchen with you, but I can try to help. There is (surprisingly) quite a bit of variance between different brands, so if you used a different brand for almond flour, coconut flour, etc. that could have been a contributing factor. Also, was your ghee or coconut oil melted like the recipe says? Out of curiosity, how did the recipe turn out?
Well something is wrong it keeps telling me a problem has occurred with the website and realoading. I didn’t use any wheat flour only the sunflower seed flour I made. I whipped the egg whites with some cream of tarter. I will try your blender idea. I did not take a picture but it came out heavy and dense but it did rise pretty good considering I toasted the sunflower flour after I made the flour because I did t know I was supposed to do it before. It made it a little freaky. I will cut back on the butter next time. I can’t tell you how much better the tast was from toasting the flour. Ok I better stop my computer does not want to cooperate. Thank you so much I will be in touch again thanks for the great recipes.

Hello, this bread recipe looks great, and I really want to make it for my dad who is intolerant to gluten and must settle with the sad and tiny store bought gluten free loaves. However, the only bread pan I have is one inch larger in dimensions, do you recommend increasing the recipe? Like doubling it or using 1.5 times the ingredients? Thank you :)


“I only have a full size loaf pan, and did as someone else mentioned, increased the recipe by .5 (for the eggs did 8 eggs rather than 7), and it came out the perfect size and absolutely delicious. Looking forward to enjoying it the rest of the week. I used a glass full size loaf and cooked for 40 minutes at 350 degrees. I topped it with extra flax seeds because I too love the nutty flavor of flax.”
Richard Nikoley has the blog Free The Animal. He loves meat eating. His diet is near paleo, with the addition of some gray-area foods that he likes. These days most of his posts are on food. One recent trend in the paleo community is trying to optimize the proportions of the foods eaten. If you've read my definition you'll know that I simply define the diet as foods in and out. One of Richard's posts: Optimality: A Fool's Errand? has produced a long discussion of this trend.
So, it’s my LAST DAY of the Whole30 (and perhaps yours, too!) the last day of January, and it’s time to welcome some Paleo treats back into my life.  And yours, of course.   It’s almost Valentines Day, right?!  And – maybe it’s just me – but I can’t do Valentines Day without my fair share of chocolate.   Luckily there are so many easy, deliciously indulgent chocolate recipes that taste classically rich but are made without any unhealthy ingredients.
Finally made this recipe, is my second bread recipe I’ve made and the top is nice but the inside always feels moist … I am putting it in the oven a bit more to see if it dries out, is that the texture that it should have because of the butter or what? I liked the flavor! Just not sure of how is supposed to be inside. I haven’t watched the video yet. Thanks!!
We cannot time travel and join our Paleo ancestors by the campfire as they prepare to eat; likewise, shards of ancient pottery and fossilized teeth can tell us only so much. If we compare the diets of so-called modern hunter-gatherers, however, we see just how difficult it is to find meaningful commonalities and extract useful dietary guidelines from their disparate lives (see infographic). Which hunter–gatherer tribe are we supposed to mimic, exactly? How do we reconcile the Inuit diet—mostly the flesh of sea mammals—with the more varied plant and land animal diet of the Hadza or !Kung? Chucking the many different hunter–gather diets into a blender to come up with some kind of quintessential smoothie is a little ridiculous. "Too often modern health problems are portrayed as the result of eating 'bad' foods that are departures from the natural human diet…This is a fundamentally flawed approach to assessing human nutritional needs," Leonard wrote. "Our species was not designed to subsist on a single, optimal diet. What is remarkable about human beings is the extraordinary variety of what we eat. We have been able to thrive in almost every ecosystem on the Earth, consuming diets ranging from almost all animal foods among populations of the Arctic to primarily tubers and cereal grains among populations in the high Andes.”
I made dressing/stuffing out of this bread! I cut the bread into slices, then cut the slices into cubes. I put them on a metal pan and into my toaster oven on low temperature and let them crisp up. It takes a good while, but they DO get crisp! Then I have my croutons for the dressing. The dressing I made was delicious. I think the next time I make the bread to use for croutons I’m going to add onion powder and sage to the mixture before baking so the croutons will be seasoned some before I begin making the dressing! Love this bread! It is the most like wheat flour bread that I have tried! Thanks Maya!
Whenever I come across a recipe and I want to convert it to grams I use the amount on say my bag of almond flour and calculate it out. My almond flour weighs out to be 112 grams per cup so for this recipe you would use 224 grams of almond flour (I use superfine Kirkland brand from Costco and I’ve also used Bob’s Red Mill superfine and they both work equally well). The 2 tablespoons of coconut flour is a small amount so I wouldn’t bother weighing that out. As for the flax seed, I buy mine whole and measure accordingly and grind in my coffee grinder.
Paleo baking is gluten free and grain free. Generally, paleo bread recipes have quite a few more ingredient options than low carb baking. Ingredients like tapioca flour and arrowroot flour are common in paleo baked goods, and help improve the texture greatly. The only thing is, these ingredients are relatively high in carbs and are typically avoided (or at least reduced) in low carb baking. This is why paleo baking can sometimes be a bit easier than low carb and/or keto baking.

Hi Sara! Hmmm, I’m not sure- I haven’t tried anything else. I don’t think there would be a good sub for almond flour. I do have another sandwich bread recipe that is nut free and paleo- it’s in my ebook. It only takes 1/2 cup cassava flour! You can find it here if you are interested. https://paleoglutenfree.com/shop/quick-easy-paleo-breads/ Sorry I don’t have a good sub for the almond!
A decade ago, when I was on the low-fat craze, I’d make fluffy cakes using no butter/fat, replacing it with apple sauce, which gives moisture and a soft texture. These days, I’m a low-carb girl, but a 1/4 cup of apple sauce divided by 4 = only 1 tablespoon (per roll/per 2nd day). I’m okay with that, especially because I substitute half the tapioca flour (high-carb) for whey protein powder to cut a few carbs that way. 🙂
Thank you so much for your recipe. This is the best keto bread recipe I have come across. There is only one suggestion it’s better to use medium size 8X4 inch pan to get perfect size slices. There is one question., can we replace coconut flour with almond flour completely? If yes what is the quantity for almond flour in this case? Thank you once again.
Just made this (Literally….it’s still hot) and I gotta say, I was skeptical! When it started to balloon out of the cup I was terrified! BUT, it legitimately tastes like a grainy bread. I’m using this for open faced sloppy joe tonight so I’m gonna toast the next batch. For those of you wondering, I used 2T of ghee instead of the 2.5 of butter. Came out perfect. 552 calories/16g protein for the whole “loaf”. Not that us Paleo kids care about calories. wink wink.
I love this recipe and I like to tweak things. I came up with a tweak to make banana bread. Since holiday baking is my weakness and I had an almost suicidal reaction to wheat (I really know I’m allergic now) I wanted some banana bread. I subbed 1 cup of almond flour to walnut flour, omitted the ACV, added sweetener to taste, 1 tsp vanilla, 1 tsp pumpkin pie spice (sugar free) and 1 mashed banana. I LOVE banana so I also added a little banana flavoring. Baked up to a heavenly bread that I can eat without bloating and severe mood reactions!! I LOVE this site for recipes!! My next attempt will be either pumpkin bread or orange cranberry. Makes a great “I NEED SWEET” snack or breakfast as I’m zooming out the door.
Made this today, had a couple slices for a sandwich for lunch! My add-in spices was a Mediterranean spice blend that added a nice depth. I froze the rest for future sandwich cravings… thanks for an easy recipe with everything I have on hand! Oh, and I used 3/4 cup of dehydrated almond pulp from making milk, and 1/2 cup bob’s red mill gf flour instead of all almond flour!
Well I whipped the eggs. I will pour it in a little at a time. I may have went to fast. I’m making your exact recipe on the next batch. It looks so good and perfect for a sandwich. I can use mine for sandwich also and makes great toast. I want to master your original recipe. So waiting on my Honeyville flour. Thanks the recipe is loved by everyone that’s tried it and your other recipes as well. I will be waiting for the video.
They go through a virtual checklist on what makes a bread a bread, and it’s pretty much right on. You want your bread to be able to toast up in the toaster, to have a crust on the outside but be soft on the inside, and to slice up without giving you too many problems. The reason this becomes important to consider is because many breads that try to cut out wheat and up falling short of many of these requirements. But this bread is up to the challenge and can be that go-to bread recipe you’ll need while going with the Paleo lifestyle.
Flatbread is a nice change of pace to ordinary loaves, and it goes really well with all sorts of meals, and you can even make a meal out of it by using it to make a sandwich. This cheesey version is made using tapioca flour, so it will have a different texture and flavor than breads made with almond flour or coconut flour. The cheese they’re using is the kind that is usually given a nod on Paleo, unless you are being very strict. Hard cheeses like asiago and parmesan are usually given a pass because they don’t include as much dairy. It’s up to you to determine what your body can handle.
Maya, this is a beautiful looking bread. I’m going to try it, but before I do, I’d like to know if you have ever tried doubling the recipe. It seems that it would work–based on the fact that my almond flour bread that I have made for years uses 3 1/4 cups flour, and turns out pretty well. (I’m pretty content with my recipe, but admit that yours looks better due to the whiteness and it appears to have more air bubbles, indicating it’s probably lighter.) If I don’t hear from you, I’ll probably go ahead and double it, and use a 9×5 pan–wish me luck. 

If you’ve ever considered (or tried) the Paleo diet, your first thought was probably, “ugh, another one with no bread?!” We feel you, it’s a tough moment when you hear your beloved carbs must go. ICYMI, the Paleo diet cuts out grains and legumes in favor of a protein- and veggie-rich diet. Sure, Wonder Bread wasn’t part of a caveman’s diet, but that doesn’t mean modern-day humans haven’t found a way around the rules.
This was my first attempt at GF baking…and it turned out okay as in it’s not burnt and definately edible. I think I had glass pan issues…and I didn’t realize you had to melt the coconut oil since the recipe didn’t specify in liquid form vs soft solid…but my main comments is that it’s just too eggy. Like French toast eggy. Definately not what I’m looking for as a GF bread option to eat in the morning WITH EGGS. On to the next recipe.
A number of randomized clinical trials have compared the paleo diet to other eating plans, such as the Mediterranean Diet or the Diabetes Diet. Overall, these trials suggest that a paleo diet may provide some benefits when compared with diets of fruits, vegetables, lean meats, whole grains, legumes and low-fat dairy products. These benefits may include:
For many years Arthur De Vany Ph.D. has been writing a book called Evolutionary Fitness on "What Evolution Teaches Us About How to Live and Stay Healthy." The diet he follows fits into my core diet definition. He may have been the first one to use the paleo diet to maximize fitness. His current site is Art's Blog on Fitness, Health, Aging, Nutrition and Exercise [archive.org].
WOW! WOW! WOW! Did I say Wow! This is exactly what I have been looking for, a low carb bread as I am a diabetic. I did not know that arrowroot is a carb but I calculated that 1/2c. equals 72 g. of carbohydrates roughly. So not too bad. I have enjoyed every recipe I have tried so far. I can’t tell you how happy I am that I accidentally discovered your website. Keep up the good work!! I just can’t stop making everything I see. ?
The theory is our bodies were designed, and still optimized, to eat what our Paleolithic ancestors ate. Like your hunger-gatherer forefathers, on Paleo you get all the meat from wild animals and unlimited fruits and vegetables you can eat. But no starchy vegetables (like potatoes), no legumes (like lentils or beans), no wheat, and no grains (like quinoa or corn) because those plants were invented by human beings during the agricultural revolution after our Paleolithic ancestors left the planet. You get one cheat day where you can eat whatever you want (“Occasional cheating and digressions may be just what you need to help you stick to the diet.”) No oil because it puts omega 6 and omega 3 ratios out of whack which should never exceed 2:1, except olive oil if you must. Dairy is also prohibited. And meat must come from animals that weren’t fed grains (like corn) because grains lead to inflammation and increased fat.
Thank you so much for this recipe. I haven t had bread since starting Paleo about 3 1/2 months ago. Then my husband asked me to make him Zucchini Blueberry Bread, which I find irresistible. I made his bread last night then found this recipe. I made it today. I added some shredded zucchini and a handful of blueberries to it. It appeared done after 90 seconds but had a raw section inside. So I simply microwaved it a little more. It was absolutely delicious. Thanks again.
I had the same effect but I used the same pan. The issue I had was the egg whites. I beat them with a mixer for 2 minutes with the cream of tartar and still couldn’t get them whipped. I’d say they were half whipped. I gave up and put them in the loan pan anyway. The bread looked the same and tasted great but it was somewhat spongy. I’m wondering if the egg whites really wouldn’t whip because I didn’t realize they had to be room temp. The bread is great but it won’t hold up for sandwiches. Any tips on egg whipping? I felt egg defeated today!
I know that soy can cause inflammation and if you are not using soy free eggs, that could be part of the cause. It may not be the actual egg but the soy that is the problem. just a thought. Here is an article that has some interesting info on soy. http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/07/29/soy-effects-on-women.aspx?e_cid=20120729_SNL_Art_1
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