The Paleo Answer: 7 Days to Lose Weight, Feel Great, Stay Young by Loren Cordain. The author shows you how to supercharge the Paleo diet for optimal lifelong health and weight loss. Featuring a new prescriptive 7-day plan and surprising revelations from the author's original research, it's the most powerful Paleo guide yet. Published December 20, 2011.
Elana – your site is my go-to place for all baking ideas and snack recipes. I’m a huge experimenter myself, so I love using your recipes for a base (or following exactly for a trial run) and then running wild. Thank you so much for all the time and effort you put into making your recipes not only edible, but delicious and filling and healthful. I’m always excited for your post.

I’ve been on a Keto diet for 8 weeks now and haven’t eaten any bread. This recipe should come with a warning – extra willpower required! ‘Cool in the pan for 2 hours’. Are you kidding me? It smelled so delicious I had to have a slice still warm, with butter. It was delicious. Next time I’ll be good and follow the instructions. Can’t wait to try the others. Thank you Elana!
We love nuts and they are decidedly paleo diet friendly. Be careful though, as cashews are high in fat and, for some reason, it’s incredibly easy to eat an entire jar of them in one sitting (that’s not just us, is it?). If you’re trying to lose weight, limit the amount of nuts you’re consuming. Otherwise, have at it. I mean, you can’t beat a good almond/pecan/walnut mix, can you?
So, it’s my LAST DAY of the Whole30 (and perhaps yours, too!) the last day of January, and it’s time to welcome some Paleo treats back into my life.  And yours, of course.   It’s almost Valentines Day, right?!  And – maybe it’s just me – but I can’t do Valentines Day without my fair share of chocolate.   Luckily there are so many easy, deliciously indulgent chocolate recipes that taste classically rich but are made without any unhealthy ingredients.

Finally found the recommended loaf size and could hardly wait to make this paleo bread. After 45 minutes and the toothpick coming out clean, removed it from the oven. After it cooled, cut it to serve and had two inches on either end and about a half an inch on the top and bottom that were edible. The middle consisted of what I would call an empty tunnel about the size of a silver dollar and surrounded by uncooked batter. Yuck. What’s so interesting is I made your Scrumptious Sandwich bread out of your book, and it turned out perfectly. I’ve been baking a LONG time, and I can’t even speculate as to what happened to this loaf. Did I have a massive air bubble in the middle, and, if so, why? Did using the food processor affect it? Any light you can shed on this will be greatly appreciated. I’ve been experimenting with the recipes in this cookbook and loving it. Please help me understand what happened to this paleo bread.
umm, hard to say what may have caused this to happen. A few things I can think of are the temperature in your oven, the other ingredients you used, and the way you measured them. It’s so hard to say. I’ve made this bread with Welbee’s so it’s not that. Are you using measuring spoons and cups? I think you should try again. If you can purchase an oven thermometer to make sure the temperature is where you want it during baking I would do that. Every oven is so different… Here’s one for $6.51 on Amazon http://amzn.to/1WcJ1tv. Also, when you use test your bread with the stick, be sure to insert it all the way in, and in a couple different places. Please let me know how it goes when you make it again.
*I researched on yeast substitue sites that the apple cider vinegar (you or lemon juice if you prefer )and baking soda ratios MUST be a proportional 1:1 . (Ex: 1 tablespoon of each). Also when you add all the dough ingredients together, omit Applecider vinegar and baking soda untill your ready to pop dough in pan into the oven. (Whisking the vinegar and baking soda together also produces the same desired effect as yeast in a regular bread recipe ..thus the addition quickly and at the end)
An Interview with Ward Nicholson now has three parts on the web. Good overview of man's diet over the past 65 million years. Long but highly recommended reading. First published in Chet Day's "Health & Beyond" newsletter. Now part of a very comprehensive Beyond Vegetarianism site. Every argument that your vegetarian friends use to avoid meat for health reasons is debunked here.
Is there any place to get organic almond flour–and please don’t talk about Bob’s Red Mills. Most of their products are NOT organic and that includes their almond flour. I am pretty disciplined about not using chemically grown food. Also, since most American almonds come from California there is the added concern about whether they are watered with waste water from oil companies.
Gluten is a protein found in things like rye, wheat, and barley. It’s now being said that much of our population may be gluten-intolerant (hence all the new “gluten-free!” items popping up everywhere).  Over time, those who are gluten intolerant can develop a dismal array of medical conditions from consuming gluten: dermatitis, joint pain, reproductive problems, acid reflux, and more.[2]

Fattening cattle with corn changes the lipid balance and is clearly not the natural diet for a grass eating cow. In Simple change in cattle diets could cut E. coli infection researchers have found that when cattle were fed hay or grass for just five days before slaughter, much less E. Coli cells were present in the animal's feces and virtually all surviving E. coli bacteria were not acid-resistant and were killed by human stomach acid.
We cannot time travel and join our Paleo ancestors by the campfire as they prepare to eat; likewise, shards of ancient pottery and fossilized teeth can tell us only so much. If we compare the diets of so-called modern hunter-gatherers, however, we see just how difficult it is to find meaningful commonalities and extract useful dietary guidelines from their disparate lives (see infographic). Which hunter–gatherer tribe are we supposed to mimic, exactly? How do we reconcile the Inuit diet—mostly the flesh of sea mammals—with the more varied plant and land animal diet of the Hadza or !Kung? Chucking the many different hunter–gather diets into a blender to come up with some kind of quintessential smoothie is a little ridiculous. "Too often modern health problems are portrayed as the result of eating 'bad' foods that are departures from the natural human diet…This is a fundamentally flawed approach to assessing human nutritional needs," Leonard wrote. "Our species was not designed to subsist on a single, optimal diet. What is remarkable about human beings is the extraordinary variety of what we eat. We have been able to thrive in almost every ecosystem on the Earth, consuming diets ranging from almost all animal foods among populations of the Arctic to primarily tubers and cereal grains among populations in the high Andes.”
*Do NOT use an almond butter that you need to stir, as I did not have luck with it setting properly, and sticking to the coconut cream. I used Maranatha No-stir natural almond butter and highly recommend it! **You really only need about 2oz chocolate to cover the bars, but having some extra makes it SO much easier to get them covered evenly and quickly. The nutrition information reflects 2oz, but definitely use 3 to make it easier on yourself.
The evolutionary discordance is incomplete, since it is based mainly on the genetic understanding of the human diet and a unique model of human ancestral diets, without taking into account the flexibility and variability of the human dietary behaviors over time.[27] Studies of a variety of populations around the world show that humans can live healthily with a wide variety of diets, and that in fact, humans have evolved to be flexible eaters.[28] Lactose tolerance is an example of how some humans have adapted to the introduction of dairy into their diet. While the introduction of grains, dairy, and legumes during the Neolithic revolution may have had some adverse effects on modern humans, if humans had not been nutritionally adaptable, these technological developments would have been dropped.[29]
Wendy, I’m just a grandma, who has not experienced your issues, but I wonder what else your son eats. does he eat apple sauce? try making a bread with coconut flour, eggs and let him add apple sauce to it. the apple sauce will provide sweetness, the coconut flour is said to offer more of a normal bread consistency, the eggs bind the coconut flour together. remember that coconut flour is VERY absorbent. you only need a little. I’m going to suggest microwave muffins in a cup so you don’t have to make so much only to have him reject it. here is a sample recipe for you to try.
I added the correct amount of honey and coconut oil and baked in a loaf tin for 30 minutes at fan oven 160 (converted 350f) but after the 2 hours cooling it’s still slightly soft/sticky through the whole centre so have put it back in! :( I also used flax seed as I didn’t have flax meal and I’m guessing that’s why the mixture was so thick and dry/separating before cooking – I’m clearly a poor baker! Ha ha but any advice on how I can improve my bake would really be appreciated:) Thank you
We cannot time travel and join our Paleo ancestors by the campfire as they prepare to eat; likewise, shards of ancient pottery and fossilized teeth can tell us only so much. If we compare the diets of so-called modern hunter-gatherers, however, we see just how difficult it is to find meaningful commonalities and extract useful dietary guidelines from their disparate lives (see infographic). Which hunter–gatherer tribe are we supposed to mimic, exactly? How do we reconcile the Inuit diet—mostly the flesh of sea mammals—with the more varied plant and land animal diet of the Hadza or !Kung? Chucking the many different hunter–gather diets into a blender to come up with some kind of quintessential smoothie is a little ridiculous. "Too often modern health problems are portrayed as the result of eating 'bad' foods that are departures from the natural human diet…This is a fundamentally flawed approach to assessing human nutritional needs," Leonard wrote. "Our species was not designed to subsist on a single, optimal diet. What is remarkable about human beings is the extraordinary variety of what we eat. We have been able to thrive in almost every ecosystem on the Earth, consuming diets ranging from almost all animal foods among populations of the Arctic to primarily tubers and cereal grains among populations in the high Andes.”

Hi Synaca, thanks for your feedback! I don’t think your bread sunk in the middle because you substituted tapioca. This was probably from the almond flour you used that may have been more coarsely ground. If the particles in the flour are larger, the ingredients won’t bind properly. Try sifting the flour before you measure the amount you need to remove those larger chunks. Another thing to consider is the temperature in your oven. Do you have an oven thermometer? Please let me know when you make it again and how it turns out.
There is little argument over the health benefits of fruits and vegetables. They are chock-full of vitamins, minerals, fiber and antioxidants. The only caveat for paleo dieters is that some vegetables are starchy (e.g., potatoes) and some fruits are higher in sugar (e.g., bananas). So, if you are trying to lose weight or watch your blood sugar levels, eat these in moderation. In fact, potatoes are banned from some versions of the diet.
Hi Melissa, Are you beating the whole eggs? It needs to be egg whites only. Whole eggs will never form peaks. Adding a little cream of tartar helps, as well as making sure you start with a very clean bowl (preferably not plastic if you’re having issues). Having the egg whites at room temperature can be a little easier, too, though I usually don’t need to. Hope this answers your question!
This is amazingly similar to real bread. I made a few changes, but I’m so happy with how it turned out! I can’t wait to make this for my Mom. Next time I will double the recipe to get normal sized bread. The changes I made were that I used 3 eggs and 1 chia egg. I also baked 10 extra minutes because of all the complaints about a doughy center, but ended up overbaking. Next time I will stick to the original baking time. Thank you so much Elana! I love your vegan herb crackers as well; I eat vegan 4 times a week and they are life savers! Definitely a staple. I can tell that they are one of the things I will be taking to college with me once I graduate in 2 years :)
I made this but didn’t have baking powder, so I subbed a little baking soda and greek yogurt instead. I also added some italian herb blend. I froze it overnight to take to camp. Now it’s perfect for a lunch or snack. I’m topping a slice with a little goat chesee, fresh basil, couple pieces of spring mix and a few cherry tomatoes on the side! It’s delicious!
Hi! I’ve been looking for a good paleo bread substitute recipe lately and this one looks perfect and then some! I was just wondering if it’s lower in calories than regular bread as I’ve been trying to watch my calorie intake recently and I know almond flour is a little higher than regular flour. Does anyone happen to know what the calorie count is for one loaf? Thanks in advance!
We’ve been on the Keto journey since the end of February last year and this is my favourite bread recipe so far, I just made a loaf and it turned out great. I don’t have a food processor so I did use my blender and for ingredients I only used the almond flour, coconut flour, baking powder, butter, salt, 8 egg whites (all I had left in the fridge) and the only optional ingredient I added was stevia. The texture was still really nice without the extra ingredients which is a nice option and this tasted like a regular loaf of bread, I’ll definitely be making this again!!
Hi~ I tried to read all of the reviews to find this answer before asking, but there are a LOT of them! Instead, I’ll just ask 🙂 My husband cannot have anything almond related at the moment. Are there any other flours that would work instead of almond flour? I’ve made soooo many loaves of bread, and every single one of them was pretty terrible, and that’s even w/ very lowered standards! I also swore I’d not make another bread, but here I am…. Also, I’d have to sub in duck eggs for chicken eggs, which could throw another wrench into the plans.
I’m new to the whole GF thing – I don’t have a physical need/condition for eating grain free, but the whole concept of this healthy way of eating intrigues me, so I’m just “testing the waters.” It is very generous that Elana shares her recipes for free so that I can give it a try before jumping in with both feet – and when/if I do, I’ll be buying her recipe books. Great blog.
This spring, Dr Cordain did an interview answering ten questions about the basics of The Paleo Diet®. To start your New Years out right, we wanted to share his answers with you. We hope you enjoy! - The Paleo Diet Team 1. The Paleo diet can be traced to a 1975 book by Walter Voegtlin, but, correct me if I’m wrong, you are responsible for bringing this diet to popularity in your 2002 book “The Paleo Diet.” Can you me about your...

I’m not a nutritionist, so this is just a rough estimate, but here is the nutrition breakdown for 1 serving (based on 10 servings per loaf): 239.4kcals, 11.4g carbs, 3.4g fiber, 8g net carbs, 19.3g fat, 7.9g protein. You can make the determination based on the macros as to whether or not you can fit this bread into a ketogenic lifestyle. I hope that helps!
Thank you for another amazing recipe, Elana! I am thrilled to find delicious recipes that support a healthy lifestyle, and that I can share with family and friends. Your cookbooks are a staple in our house and your blog is a gift to me. I am looking forward to trying some of your great breakfast ideas to start to school year off right. Thanks for sharing the fruit of your efforts. :)

Hi Tessa, it’s hard to say what went wrong if you said you used all of the exact same ingredients as I do, and you follow the directions. The only thing I can think of is how you’re measuring your ingredients. Adding more yogurt or milk will not help and may make your bread very soggy. Let me know what happens when you try again. I will make a video showing the process soon.

Paleo baking is gluten free and grain free. Generally, paleo bread recipes have quite a few more ingredient options than low carb baking. Ingredients like tapioca flour and arrowroot flour are common in paleo baked goods, and help improve the texture greatly. The only thing is, these ingredients are relatively high in carbs and are typically avoided (or at least reduced) in low carb baking. This is why paleo baking can sometimes be a bit easier than low carb and/or keto baking.


i loved this recipe! my bread did not rise like yours did although i used the recommended pan size. maybe because i used bob’s red mill meal/flour and my eggs were straight out of the fridge. those were the only two factors i could think of. anyways, the bread was delicious and i have longed for bread while following paleo plans. thanks, and i will continue to search for the flour that you recommend and allow my eggs to warm up a bit prior to my next loaf. i will let you know how that worked out.
According to the CDC, cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death in the United States. Interestingly however, our Paleolithic ancestors and contemporarily studied hunter-gatherers showed virtually no heart attack or stroke while eating ancestral diets. The references below will explore these facts to better help you understand the heart-healthy benefits of a Paleo diet.

This is great! I have tried GF bread recipes numerous times, to no avail… which was very disheartening, since I can make wonderful wheat bread without even thinking about it! But THIS recipe turned out great! It made a fluffy, moist bread that held up to slicing, holding burgers, everything you could want in a bread! And it couldn’t get any simpler to make. I doubled the recipe and baked in a loaf pan for 30min as suggested above, since I don’t have the rings, and it was great. Thank you for an awesome recipe!

I made it with Egg Replacer since I’m allergic to eggs and it turned out wonderful. I did add a few drops of yellow food dye(which probably isn’t paleo but you have to eat with your eyes too) to make it look close to the look of egg yolks. It was delicious! It didn’t rise as much as the one I made with the egg yolks for a friend, but it was still DIVINE!!
Hi Solange, if you use the recommended size baking pan, the bread will be the proper height. If you use a pan that is bigger than the one I used, your bread will rise, but it won’t fill the pan to the right height. Here’s an example that might help –if you place 1/2 cup of water in a 1/2 measuring cup it will be 100% full to the top of the cup. If you put the same 1/2 cup of water in a 1 cup measuring cup it will only fill it 50% and will only be 1/2 full in height. That’s why a loaf pan that is too large doesn’t work for this recipe when it comes to the height of the loaf :-)

A special note on dairy: I made this bread with dairy (butter and greek plain yogurt) so technically some people would go against it being called Paleo. With the knowladge we now have today we should know that there are many benefits to consuming dairy made from organic grass fed animals. Butter is an extremely good source of fat and loaded with vitamin A, D and K, and Conjugated Linoleic Acid. Yogurt contains live and active bacteria that are beneficial and keep your digestive system clean and provide food for the friendly bacteria that reside there. On top of that, the live active probiotic bacteria in yogurt can rev up your immune system and reduce your risk of yeast infection, prevent allergy symptoms and naturally increase your metabolism. Not all yogurts are made the same though, so you need to look for these words on the label:  “contain active cultures”, “active yogurt cultures”, or “living yogurt cultures”.
I really wanted to keep this nut and seed paleo bread more on the seed side. Haha, you get my point. The only nut that is really involved is almond in the almond flour. The rest are seeds such as pumpkin seeds, chia seed, and poppyseed, which you can interchange with flax or sunflower seeds. Either way, it truly gives the bread a nutty flavor that’s not too heavy. Cool?
I wanted to try your recipe and I found almost all the ingredients here where I live. But I’m still stuck on the isolate whey protein. Could I skip to another protein, like pea protein? Do you think it alters rising/taste? I’ve never baked anything with this powder proteins, and since this pea protein happens to be the one easily on reach, I was wondering if you could help me sorting this out.
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