Primal Blueprint Quick and Easy Meals: Delicious, Primal-approved meals you can make in under 30 minutes by Mark Sisson and Jennifer Meier. Every recipe is accompanied by an ingredient list, a nutrient list, clearly written instructions, and a picture of the ingredients and a picture of the finished product. Note that this is a primal book and many recipes include dairy. Published March 25, 2011.

I double the recipe, and started to put it into an 11 x 15 glass casserole, but I could see it was going to be spread too thin, so I hurriedly scraped the batter into a 9 x 12 pan. I baked it for 30 minutes, and it came out wonderfully. I cut it cake style into 12 squares, and by slicing them in half sideways, the squares are perfect as a bun or ciabatta. Holds together well, doesn’t crumble, nice thickness, and plenty of chewy crust.
I love love love love!!! This recipe. My only questions are how should I store the bread? And how long should it last without spoiling? I made a loaf on Sunday evening and kept it in an airtight container on my counter. By Friday morning (or maybe even before because I hadn’t eaten it for a day or so) it was ripe. Smelled like something was fermenting. Any tips? Maybe I should have stored it in the fridge.
Paleoista: Gain Energy, Get Lean, and Feel Fabulous With the Diet You Were Born to Eat by Nell Stephenson. Paleoista is not only a how-to book, it is also a glimpse into the life of a woman who gives advice on how to eat this way, and lives the life, day in and day out. The author's websites: NellStephenson.com Nutrition & Fitness and Paleoista.com. To be published May 1, 2012.

Divya, I’m happy to hear the flavor was great, but sorry to hear the bread was flat! I’ll try to help you troubleshoot…first I would check to make sure that your baking powder is fresh. Also, did you use the full cup of egg whites? Did you use a 9 by 5-inch loaf pan? Did you cook it at 350F and is your oven properly calibrated? Did you bake it for the amount of time the recipe calls for?


As paleo guru Robb Wolf puts it, think of a 100-yard football field. The first 99.5 yards are how long Homo-Sapiens spent as hunter-gatherers. As they became REALLY good at hunting and gathering our bodies adapted to that lifestyle over thousands of years. That last half-yard represents our species after the agricultural revolution, where our diet has shifted (but our genetics haven’t).
The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living: An Expert Guide to Making the Life-Saving Benefits of Carbohydrate Restriction Sustainable and Enjoyable by Stephen D. Phinney and Jeff S. Volek synthesizes the science into one readable source. The book is excellent for general low-carb high-fat moderate protein diets. While they begin with the idea that we should eat like a caveman, they do not follow the conclusion to its logical end and have us avoid the classes of foods our ancestors would have found unrecognizable. They avoid the metobolic syndrome, but not the autoimmune diseases. They mention that monosaturates should be favored, though they are not emphasized in the menu example. The book's daily menu examples also all include dairy in one form or another. No tips are given tips for those who do not do dairy. Published May 19, 2011. The Amazon reviews average to 4+.

Evolution of the Human Diet: The Known, the Unknown, and the Unknowable by Peter S. Ungar. Diet is key to understanding the ecology and evolution of our distant ancestors and their kin, the early hominins. A study of the range of foods eaten by our progenitors underscores just how unhealthy many of our diets are today. This volume brings together authorities from disparate fields to offer new insights into the diets of our ancestors. Paleontologists, archaeologists, primatologists, nutritionists and other researchers all contribute pieces to the puzzle. The book has four sections: Reconstructed diets based on hominin fossils--tooth size, shape, structure, wear, and chemistry, mandibular biomechanics. Archaeological evidence of subsistence--stone tools and modified bones. Models of early hominin diets based on the diets of living primates--both human and non-human, paleoecology, and energetics. Nutritional analyses and their implications for evolutionary medicine.
New here, but loving your recipees so far (totally game changer for my diet and life)! I’ve tried this bread a few times now, but am struggling with it a little bit and was hoping that you could help me try to figure out what to try next. The taste is fantastic, but I’m having trouble with the rise. My yeast is bubbling and I’ve had it proving on my oven (which is pretty hot! –too hot?). The structure inside looks like there were air bubbles, but they got knocked out or something (sort of squished), but your picture looks incredible so I’m hoping that I can change something. The taste seems a little dense and chewy so far. I’m very new to baking, so it might also be a bake problem. I’m in Chicago.
I have a processor but I use my big girl lifting weights mixer. I use the whip not the paddle to mix first the eggs getting in lots of air and and fold in 2 cups of thick yogurt cheese.(Regular non fat plain yogurt filtered though a coffee filter in the refrig.) I use the paddle and add the dry ingredients. I mix them on slow and just for a brief make sure that the dough it is all the same all the way through. I am seeing now whether I can replace the coconut oil with extra virgin elixir of the olives as sweet is not great with horseradish on roast beef. I’m also thinking that although it doesn’t rise much if at all that if I patted it into a loaf shape in some way and oiled the crust heavily it might have a smooth crust. and then plop it in the pan. I toast it like for egg in the hole by browning it in a heavy frying pan. Okay it is not bread bread but it better than no b read at all. And best of all I like it just fine and that’s what counts in the long run. Food should not be such a big deal. It should get your from point A to Point B with style and class not slathering butter on just cooked doughy yeasty hard on the digestion bread for me any more. I’m going to try going all almond flour as the coconut flour has so moisture and sweet ness that contributes to the heavy texture I think Of course the moisture is what makes it stick together too, Everything is a work in progress remember to use your processor to make crumbs out of the not so hot loaves. Breaded lemon dill tilapia anyone?
I made this last night and it turned out great! I used Bob’s Red Mill almond flour which I know you don’t usually recommend and subbed 1/8 cup chia seed for the flax because that’s what I had on hand and it worked well. We’ve had grilled cheese and peanut butter sandwiches so far. My son is autistic and a very picky eater, and sometimes we have a hard time getting him the protein he needs so this recipe helps a lot. Thanks, Elana!
My 16 month old son loves the bread. He prefers it over the bakery italian bread(full of gluten and yeast) that we normally get him. Plus our dog is allergic to grains, so now I don’t have to worry about our son sharing his bread with her. As for me, I’m allergic to yeast and I’ve wanted to reduce gluten in my diet. Finding gluten and yeast free bread is nearly impossible.
Sweden's Staffan Lindeberg has a home page Paleolithic Diet in Medical Nutrition [archive.org]. A recent study of Staffan's has A Paleolithic diet improving glucose tolerance more than a Mediterranean-like diet in individuals with ischemic heart disease. Also see his first web page, an overview of his Kitava study: On the Benefits of Ancient Diets. Now he has a book Food and Western Disease: Health and nutrition from an evolutionary perspective. Here's a book review: Easy to Read, Informative, Packed with Footnotes on Studies.
I had to make some changes. I’m allergic to chicken eggs so I used duck eggs. I don’t use flaxseed; it’s an endocrine disruptor but I had hemp seed powder so I used that. I also have chia seed to grind so I will try that next time. Baking time was 10 minutes longer, maybe because of the duck eggs. Slices beautifully and is delicious! Thank you, Elana, for looking out for us Paleos!

Nice and firm. Baked it on the recommended temp, added 6 or 7 minutes. Pressed the middle and it was great. I let it cool. What was nice about it was obviously it’s low carb bread…hurray for that, but it cut well. Got 18 slices easily about 1/2 inch thick without breakage. Most importantly, it wasn’t greasy, or almond tasting overload, just delicious.
Paleo eating requires a lot of planning, prep time, and mental resolve. For instance, eating out on the diet isn't as simple as ordering chicken and a salad. Think: In what oil was the chicken cooked? Did any of the salad toppings come processed, canned, or packaged? "As with every elimination diet, it's just not doable long term," Dr. Ochner says. While weight loss is far from the sole purpose of eating paleo, going on and off of the diet can lead to big weight swings. Any yo-yo diet starts in weight loss from both muscle and fat, and usually ends with weight gain of all fat, which contributes to a slower metabolism and increased insulin resistance.
In Defense of Food: An Eater's Manifesto by Michael Pollan gives a guided tour of 20th century food science, a history of "nutritionism" in America and a look at the marriage of government and the food industry. Then the book presents a commonsense shopping-and-eating guide, which like the paleo diet focuses on shopping the perimeter of the supermarket. He also now has a much shorter Food Rules: An Eater's Manual.

I have just found your website and it is fantastic! Sitting at my computer my mouth is watering. I’m very new to the Gluten-free scene and am seriously considering Paleo as well so your website is a godsend. One question though, you mentioned how to measure the flour for your recipes and gave a weight in grams (thank you) but I have tried American recipes before and I think our tablespoon measure might be different also. How many millilitres is there in one of your tablespoon’s?
The best part about baking up this bread is that it makes your whole house smell like you’re making cinnamon rolls. Scratch that, the real best part is eating this bread because it tastes like you’re eating cinnamon rolls. The only difference is you won’t be eating a bunch of artificial and processed ingredients, and instead you’ll be getting nourished by foods that your body craves, like flax seed, banana, honey, and more. Here’s a bread that you can really sink your teeth into and be totally happy with what you taste.
Well I whipped the eggs. I will pour it in a little at a time. I may have went to fast. I’m making your exact recipe on the next batch. It looks so good and perfect for a sandwich. I can use mine for sandwich also and makes great toast. I want to master your original recipe. So waiting on my Honeyville flour. Thanks the recipe is loved by everyone that’s tried it and your other recipes as well. I will be waiting for the video.
I just want to send the biggest thanks to Paola and the team at Gnom-Gnom for creating these magical recipes!! Since finding this site, I’ve made this bread recipe (twice!!), the carrot cake cupcakes, salted caramel sauce, and no-churn vanilla ice cream and needless to say, they’ve all turned out incredibly successful. I have absolutely no complaints at all. I hardly ever repeat substitute keto bread recipes since I’ve never found one that has been satisfying enough but this. THIS recipe. It’s a complete game changer and has become a staple in my weekly prep and daily eating. The carrot cake cupcakes are delicious, tender and moist- unlike any of the other substitute recipes I’ve tried. And as for the ice cream and salted caramel sauce- I actually think I’ve gone to food heaven. It’s as good, if not better than the real deal. I don’t know how Paola came up with these recipes. She’s a true magician. I have so much admiration and adoration for her. Hoping that she keeps up all the amazing work and that Gnom-Gnom continues to thrive. Sending virtual hugs. x
Sugar is almost always manufactured and should be avoided on the paleo diet. This means you’ll need to cut out the delicious but destructive sweets and sugars that are standard in the Standard American Diet. The rule of thumb here is: if it contains a ton of sugar, it’s probably not on the paleo diet friendly. That said, here’s a specific lists of sweets that are not on the paleo diet food list. You might want to take a moment to say goodbye to them before you start your paleo diet journey.
My quest has been bread with more than 5 gr fiber. Chia flour is what I have found. I substitute it for 1/3 of the flour in a recipe and it does the trick. It is lavender though and does tend to make my sandwich bread a little grey. But it is very pretty in blue berry muffins and pancakes. I grind my own rice flour, millet and corn flour and it makes a huge difference.
Hi Valerie, so funny, I just got asked this question! 🙂 Here’s what I said, “…almond flour is a lot less absorbent than coconut flour (like A LOT). I know a few people have tried using oat flour with success, but I worry that almond flour would not be sufficient for absorbing the almond butter and creating a nice, firm texture. I’d recommend starting with about 3/4 cup almond flour, and experimenting as needed.” Hope this helps!
I would first like to thank you so very much for your recipes, research and website…I Love them all!! I make your paleo bread every week and have been substituting egg whites for the eggs and I notice that my bread always has a crack in the center. It could be the oven, I’m not sure, but I really like the way it turns out with the egg whites. I make a double batch and bake it in a big bread pan so it is more like a loaf of sandwich bread. Thanks again for all you do
I just made this tonight…I must say I was NOT holding out much hope, but O-M-G…it turned out delicious!! I didn’t have flax seeds (I used Chia seeds instead) and I didn’t have flaxseed meal…but had Flaxseed milled….and hey…it worked!! Thank you so much for the recipe. My only issue was that the top didn’t brown, it stayed kind of white-ish, I didn’t want to leave it in any longer cause I was afraid of over-cooking…any tips for getting the top to brown?
I don’t like keeping track of how much I’ve eaten or obsessing over how many grams of a particular nutrient I’ve had. Not only do I hate counting calories, but I know that calories are really only half of the battle, as they’re not all created equal – 400 calories of Doritos do NOT have the same effect on your body as 400 calories of high-quality vegetables and protein.
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