Even if eating only foods available to hunter–gatherers in the Paleolithic made sense, it would be impossible. As Christina Warinner of the University of Zurich emphasizes in her 2012 TED talk, just about every single species commonly consumed today—whether a fruit, vegetable or animal—is drastically different from its Paleolithic predecessor. In most cases, we have transformed the species we eat through artificial selection: we have bred cows, chickens and goats to provide as much meat, milk and eggs as possible and have sown seeds only from plants with the most desirable traits—with the biggest fruits, plumpest kernels, sweetest flesh and fewest natural toxins. Cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts and kale are all different cultivars of a single species, Brassica oleracea; generation by generation, we reshaped this one plant's leaves, stems and flowers into wildly different arrangements, the same way we bred Welsh corgis, pugs, dachshunds, Saint Bernards and greyhounds out of a single wolf species. Corn was once a straggly grass known as teosinte and tomatoes were once much smaller berries. And the wild ancestors of bananas were rife with seeds.
Hi Solange, if you use the recommended size baking pan, the bread will be the proper height. If you use a pan that is bigger than the one I used, your bread will rise, but it won’t fill the pan to the right height. Here’s an example that might help –if you place 1/2 cup of water in a 1/2 measuring cup it will be 100% full to the top of the cup. If you put the same 1/2 cup of water in a 1 cup measuring cup it will only fill it 50% and will only be 1/2 full in height. That’s why a loaf pan that is too large doesn’t work for this recipe when it comes to the height of the loaf :-)
I made this recently and it was fantastic! Thank you. Although I don’t usually eat dairy, I used Greek yogurt instead of coconut cream because of the calorie difference. I recalculated the loaf based on 10 slices and found that each slice was 186 calories, so it was much less than the 280 listed. I calculated 17.5 grams carbs, 4.1 grams fiber, 13.4 net carbs, and 10.2 grams fat. Of course, the calculations depend on the brands that you use. I used Bob’s Red Mill brand Golden Flax Seed Meal, Super Fine Almond Flour (but have ordered Wellbee’s for future use), and Arrow Root flour.
Nutrition & Physical Degeneration by Dr. Weston Price's book puts to rest a lot of myths about diet, dental, physical, and emotional health, and presents the strongest case for a super-nutritious Native (or Paleo) Diet. His book outlines the conditions/causes for exceptional health. A classic that was first published in 1938. The Soil and Health Library has a Book Review by Steve Solomon. If you don't buy the book at least read the review. N.B. If you live in one of the countries where this book is now in the public domain, you can read it online. But not if you live in a country where it is still under copyright protection.
Of course, this is just the basic of basic recipes, and you can spice it up with some Italian seasoning or some fruit mixed into the batter. When making the basic bread, I’ve found that my favorite way of eating this Paleo bread is with a hot bowl of chilli, but it also tastes great with some paleo jam or dipped in some soup. It’s not the best bread you’ve ever had, but it’s pretty good for 6 and 1/2 minutes of cooking!
Excellent recipe. I doubled the recipe so it’s standard bread slice size. I baked it for almost 60 mins (fan forced oven 325F) checking it about 50 mins in. It turned out amazing. Very filling. One sandwich fills me right up. Each slice is about 240 calories if the whole loaf is cut into 16 slices. Thank you for the recipe. I will bake it several times a week. I wrap the bread in cheese cloth and inside a ziploc bag and keep it in the fridge so it will last longer. I’m Australian and I have to eat it with Gluten Free Vegemite. OMG… delicious. I use a Coconut Spread, basically taste like butter and smear vegemite on it and OMG YUM!!! I’m in love and found something I can keep around when I’m hungry on the spot. Thank you! I have a beautiful picture of the loaf. Too bad I can’t find a place to post on here. If you have one made with coconut flour, let me know and if it sticks as well together like Almond flour. I think the Arrowroot does the trick to sticking it all together.

Ohhhh! Almond flour and coconut flour! I love it. I have made bread with just coconut flour, and love the texture, but find it too sweet. The almond flour bread I love the taste, but it’s a bit dry. This recipe sounds like a great match. I can’t wait to try it. Thanks for working so hard to find such amazing recipes and then sharing them with the world!
Thank you for this recipe. This is so amazing – easy and delicious! I made it already three times today – the first time to see how it turns out, the other times because it was so good. My 10 years old son loved it and couldn’t stop eating it as a desert with a little maple syrup. He said that it tasted like Yorkshire pudding. In one of them I replaced the half spoon of butter with 1 tablespoon of unsweetened apple sauce – it became more moist and puffed up more than the others. I could still toast it in the toaster and was very good. 

Alcohol is a no-no if you are strict paleo. Beer is made from grains, and liquor also contains traces of gluten. But, good news for cider-lovers: most hard ciders are gluten-free, so they are allowed. Check the label to be sure. Red wine is more accepted in the paleo community because it contains the antioxidant resveratrol, but sorry chardonnay lovers, white wine is technically not allowed.
The Stone Age Diet: Based on in-depth studies of human ecology and the diet of man by Walter L. Voegtlin. This was self-published back in 1975. Only a couple hundred copies were printed and distributed to friends and relatives. No one knew the book existed until some years later. In no way is he the father of the paleo diet. It is impossible to purchase. Apparently his descendents are planning a reprint, though the book is poorly written and not based upon factual anthropological information that even was available then. We have put up his Functional and Structural Comparison of Man's Digestive Tract with that of a Dog and Sheep. And a PDF can be found here.
One question, when I released this bread out of the pan there was a very strong ammonia smell coming from the bread. After it cooled this ammonia smell was gone. I’m just curious what could cause that odor? Is it a reaction from the almond flour? I was just caught off guard when I bent over to get a whiff of the freshly baked loaf and it smelled of ammonia!
Hello Elana: I have been a Paleo girl for about 8 months and am thoroughly enjoying the hunting and gathering! Today I was cooking turkey and wanted to adapt my stuffing recipe and found your Paleo bread recipe. Thanks so much. It works well with my other ingredients, mushrooms, onion, parsnips, celery, jalapeño and sausages, spicey pepper and summer savory and of course coconut oil. Can’t wait till dinner time.
These paleo 7 layer bars make the PERFECT gift for your friends and family since they look amazing and can easily be packaged.  It now makes so much sense why I used to see these magical 7 layer bars everywhere during the holidays.  Plus, they’re easy to make and, now that we can make them vegan, paleo, and even clean eating, you can share with almost anyone!
There were some recipes I tried that were decent enough and definitely passable as bread-like concoctions, but nothing was stellar. Or even good enough to warrant making a second time (IMHO). And there were also a few loaves that were actually pretty bad in different ways – either the flavor and/or the texture was just off – that ended up only being fit for the garbage (definitely a sad thing). But that’s how we learn, right? 

While going bonkers and eating chocolate creations 3 times per day is unnecessary (and would sorta defeat the point of Whole30, and Paleo in general) I DO think it’s a great time to explore all the Paleo dessert options out there – so we can have our cake (quite literally) – and still feel awesome after eating it.  That’s what Paleo treats and desserts are all about in my opinion – and it’s NO secret that I’m quite the fan of dessert, just check out the “sweet treats” section of the blog!
I am so happy to have found this delicious and easy recipe. I used a regular sized loaf pan and baked it about 5 minutes less time since the loaf is thinner. Also I think I will put a piece of parchment on the bottom of the pan next time as it stuck to the pan a little bit. I thought it had a kind of like a cornbread texture. It is so good though, I believe I will be eating some of this every day for the rest of my life. Can’t wait to try some of the suggested variations!
I don’t like keeping track of how much I’ve eaten or obsessing over how many grams of a particular nutrient I’ve had. Not only do I hate counting calories, but I know that calories are really only half of the battle, as they’re not all created equal – 400 calories of Doritos do NOT have the same effect on your body as 400 calories of high-quality vegetables and protein. 

WOW! I’ve tried so many other paleo bread recipes but felt like they either tasted like almond cake or banana bread (which is great if i want a sweet!) This is Super easy, super quick and great! In the excitement i even forgot to convert to Australian measurements and it Still worked out great! Bacon and eggs can now have some bread with it and tastes great with any paleo friendly nut spread/butter! Thanks for sharing.
I just made this tonight…I must say I was NOT holding out much hope, but O-M-G…it turned out delicious!! I didn’t have flax seeds (I used Chia seeds instead) and I didn’t have flaxseed meal…but had Flaxseed milled….and hey…it worked!! Thank you so much for the recipe. My only issue was that the top didn’t brown, it stayed kind of white-ish, I didn’t want to leave it in any longer cause I was afraid of over-cooking…any tips for getting the top to brown?
With carbohydrates and protein intake already accounted for, fat intake comprises the rest of the Paleo diet. We’ve been taught that fat is something to be avoided at all costs, but it’s actually not the total amount of fat in your diet that raises your blood cholesterol levels and increases your risk for heart disease, cancer, and Type 2 diabetes; rather, it’s the type of fat that should concern you. The Paleo diet calls for moderate to higher fat intake dominated by monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats with a better balance of omega-3 and omega-6 fats.
I have made the new recipe many times and it is really delicious. By mistake I used regular almond flour and the bread came out just as tasty as if I had used blanched almond flour. Also, coconut flour is not available where I live, so I substituted the same amount of unsweetened shredded coconut, and 1/4 cup oil for the coconut oil, since my friends said the bread had too much of a coconut flavor. The substitutions worked just fine and the bread was delicious!!! Maybe it would be even more delicious if I followed your recipe exactly, but even my son, who usually does not like “healthy” food, told me it was really good, and keeps helping himself to more slices everythime I make it.
This is the best Paleo bread I have ever had!! I have tried quite a few recipes, this one was easy and so delicious. I did do a few things differently, I used coconut oil instead of palm shortening, as that is what I had on hand. And I had no round molds so I put the batter in a glass loaf pan and it worked out just fine for me! Absolutely delicious, thank you, this will be made regularly in my kitchen!!!
OMG…Could your FABULOUS coconut palm syrup/recipe be used/considered as the ultra-expensive COCONUT NECTAR?..If so…this is sheer BRILLIANCE as it has provided a needed “Eureka” moment for me in my quest for a low glycemic substitute for agave or honey..Is the resulting syrup suitable for use in this fashion in baking?…Thank you so much for contributing your wonderful idea. 

It took a month or so, but I finally decided to start playing around with adding a few other paleo-friendly starches, like arrowroot and tapioca. That’s what it took for me to come up with what I consider to be the perfect loaf. I had been holding out on adding other starches because I wanted to keep my ingredient list minimal, but really, these additions make all the difference in the end result of this bread.


Hi Valerie, so funny, I just got asked this question! 🙂 Here’s what I said, “…almond flour is a lot less absorbent than coconut flour (like A LOT). I know a few people have tried using oat flour with success, but I worry that almond flour would not be sufficient for absorbing the almond butter and creating a nice, firm texture. I’d recommend starting with about 3/4 cup almond flour, and experimenting as needed.” Hope this helps!
It’s not magic—these bread recipes really are Paleo-compliant. They use ingredients like almond flour, tapioca flour, and flaxseeds to make it work. And while it’s probably not great to just swap out your regular bread for one of these if you want to get into the ~true spirit~ of the plan, they’re a great option to have in your back pocket when that toast craving hits hard.
I don’t like keeping track of how much I’ve eaten or obsessing over how many grams of a particular nutrient I’ve had. Not only do I hate counting calories, but I know that calories are really only half of the battle, as they’re not all created equal – 400 calories of Doritos do NOT have the same effect on your body as 400 calories of high-quality vegetables and protein.
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