If you don’t have a wood stove with a proper warming oven up top – who does these days? – then try my never-fail trick for proofing yeast: Turn on the oven light 10-15 minutes before you begin to proof your yeast. Once your yeast/water/maple syrup mix is stirred, pop the container in the upper half of your oven and close the door. It’s warm, draft free, and as long as your water is the correct temperature and your yeast is still viable, this works every time.

Most nutritionists consent that the Paleo diet gets at least one thing right—cutting down on processed foods that have been highly modified from their raw state through various methods of preservation. Examples include white bread and other refined flour products, artificial cheese, certain cold cuts and packaged meats, potato chips, and sugary cereals. Such processed foods often offer less protein, fiber and iron than their unprocessed equivalents, and some are packed with sodium and preservatives that may increase the risk of heart disease and certain cancers.

For most people the fact the Paleo diet delivers the best results is all they need. Improved blood lipids, weight loss, and reduced pain from autoimmunity is proof enough.  Many people however are not satisfied with blindly following any recommendations, be they nutrition or exercise related. Some folks like to know WHY they are doing something. Fortunately, the Paleo diet has stood not only the test of time, but also the rigors of scientific scrutiny.


Fruits are not only delicious, but they’re also great for you. That said, fruits (even paleo-approved ones) contain large amounts of fructose which, while much better than HFCS (high-fructose corn syrup), is still sugar. If you’re looking to lose weight on the paleo diet, you’ll want to cut back on your fruit intake and focus more on the vegetables allowed on the paleo diet. However, feel free to have one to three servings of fruit a day. Check out this list of paleo diet fruits and see if you’re not hungry by the end! (We’ll admit, we’re partial to blackberries!)
I’ve lived with food intolerances for about 30 years so I’m happy experimenting with all sorts of different ingredients. However, I’ve recently realised I have a problem with gluten and whilst I can make breads such as this one successfully I’ve never found a substitute that gives me the elasticity of gluten (I am unable to eat gluten free flour and having found out the ingredient that gives it the elasticity I no longer want to eat it). Have you ever found a flour or a combination of ingredients that gives the elasticity to make something like pitta bread? May I say that I wish I’d had access to your blog, ideas and cook books 30 years ago, they’re fantastic and my life would have been so much easier. Thank you for making the time to both experiment and share your ideas with others.
Our bodies need much more protein than the average person consumes. In fact, protein accounts for only 15 percent of the average person’s daily calories, while 19 to 35 percent of the average hunter-gatherer diet was comprised of protein. This was due to the high consumption of meat, seafood, and other animal products prevalent in contemporary approaches to Paleo eating.
It took a month or so, but I finally decided to start playing around with adding a few other paleo-friendly starches, like arrowroot and tapioca. That’s what it took for me to come up with what I consider to be the perfect loaf. I had been holding out on adding other starches because I wanted to keep my ingredient list minimal, but really, these additions make all the difference in the end result of this bread.
Similarly, any foods that were not easily available to Paleolithic humans are off-limits in this diet, Holley explains. That means processed foods — many of which contain added butter, margarine, and sugar — should not be a part of the paleo diet. The same goes for dairy, which may not have been accessible to Paleolithic humans, and legumes, which many proponents of the diet believe are not easily digestible by the body.
This was my first attempt at GF baking…and it turned out okay as in it’s not burnt and definately edible. I think I had glass pan issues…and I didn’t realize you had to melt the coconut oil since the recipe didn’t specify in liquid form vs soft solid…but my main comments is that it’s just too eggy. Like French toast eggy. Definately not what I’m looking for as a GF bread option to eat in the morning WITH EGGS. On to the next recipe.
Hi Eva, That’s awesome that you are helping your son this way. I haven’t tried this with other tools, but you could probably use either the blender or the food processor. The key is to pulse in step 5, not just constantly blend, so that the whites don’t fully break down. Other than that, it should be pretty similar. As for the yolks, if you don’t want to make creme brulee, I usually just put a couple extras into an omelet (or breakfast casserole, or any other dish requiring cooked eggs) mixed with whole eggs.

We’re loving the taste and texture of this–but like a few others, I came out with a dense. flat loaf (only about 1 1/2″ high). The liquid mixture seemed very thick, and the combined batter was almost a dough going into the pan, not exactly pourable. I know some almond flours behave differently; I used Bob’s Red Mill (only thing readily available here), if that makes a difference.
Hi I am new to the grain free diet and I love this bread. Has anyone figured out the calorie count for it? I have been gluten free since 2003 and it has served me well, although I think that I could benefit from grain free. But like all diet changes that I have tried in the past I tend to gain weight if I do not know the calorie count of the new recipes. Thanks.
A more controversial argument for why legumes and common grains are avoided is because of their high phytic acid content, which is thought to reduce the absorption of certain nutrients like iron zinc and calcium (6). However, phytic acid is also found in many paleo approved foods (like almonds and hazelnuts), and is associated with some health benefits - like protective benefits against kidney stones, antioxidant properties and a suggested link to lower risk for colon cancer (7,8,9). Bottom line, there really isn't any evidenced based reason to avoid these foods because of phytic acid. 
#1) If you’re not careful, this type of diet can get expensive. But as we know, with a little research, we can make eating healthy incredibly affordable. Admittedly, while I recommend eating organic fruits and veggies, free range chicken, and grass-fed beef whenever possible, these products can be a bit more expensive in conventional stores due to the processes needed to get them there.
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Eat low to moderate amounts of fruits and nuts. Try to eat mostly fruits low in sugar and high in antioxidants like berries as well as nuts high in omega-3, low in omega-6 and low in total polyunsaturated fat like macadamia nuts. Consider cutting off fruits and nuts altogether if you have an autoimmune disease, digestive problems or are trying to lose weight faster.
I made this today and here’s what I used as far as brands: Bob’s Red Mill Superfine Almond Flour (made with blanched almonds-no skins), Bob’s Red Mill Arrowroot Flour, Tillamook Butter, Zoi Greek Yogurt, Kirkland Salt, Arm & Hammer Baking Soda, Bragg’s Apple Cider Vinegar, and ground & whole flaxseed from the bulk bins at WinCo. I also added maybe a tablespoon of honey and used extra large eggs. I read through most of the reviews and based on one I decided to mix the dry ingredients as stated and mix the wet ingredients leaving the egg whites out. I whipped the egg whites until soft peaks formed and then gently mixed wet and dry ingredients together. Lastly, I gently folded in the egg whites, poured the batter into a pan lined with ungreased parchment paper, and topped with whole flax seeds. I baked this in a 7.75″ x 3″ Fat Daddio bread pan at 350 degrees for 35 minutes. It is perfect. It even rose about an inch. Perfectly baked, sliced very easily (very little crumble), and made a delicious (not too eggy) turkey sandwich. I’m super impressed. Thanks for sharing this recipe!!

My quest has been bread with more than 5 gr fiber. Chia flour is what I have found. I substitute it for 1/3 of the flour in a recipe and it does the trick. It is lavender though and does tend to make my sandwich bread a little grey. But it is very pretty in blue berry muffins and pancakes. I grind my own rice flour, millet and corn flour and it makes a huge difference.

The Paleolithic Prescription: A Program of Diet & Exercise and a Design for Living by S. Boyd Eaton, M.D., Marjorie Shostak and Melvin Konner. This book, published in 1988, was the start of the Paleolithic diet movement. Its recommendations are not in line with what today is considered a paleo diet, as whole grain breads and pastas, legumes and some low fat dairy products are allowed. However, it is still a profoundly important book. Used books are available for a reasonable price.


WOW! This bread is amazing! I have Gestational Diabetes, and have been struggling with bread since it has been spiking my sugars. Normally I don’t each much of it, but I was just craving it today. So I made a loaf and it is delicious! I went through the comments because I only have a full size loaf pan, and did as someone else mentioned, increased the recipe by .5 (for the eggs did 8 eggs rather than 7), and it came out the perfect size and absolutely delicious. Looking forward to enjoying it the rest of the week. I used a glass full size loaf and cooked for 40 minutes at 350 degrees. I topped it with extra flax seeds because I too love the nutty flavor of flax.
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I made this bread and really do like it~ we are paleo and needed a good bread recipe. What I am wondering is how the picture you have of this bread is so light and yellow colored? After making it, the bread is dark and even has a green tint to it over time. The texture and taste are both perfect, but it doesn’t look appetizing~ trying to figure out how mine looks so different than the picture of your bread. I noticed that the pictures other people posted also showed dark bread as well. I used all of the recommended ingredients exactly- but it does not come out light or yellowy. Any recommendations?

The paleo diet is meant to mimic what our preagricultural, hunter-gatherer ancestors ate. The premise is that the current Western diet is contributing to the rise of chronic diseases such as obesity, heart disease and cancer. This diet, paleo proponents claim, can reduce inflammation, improve workouts, increase energy, help with weight loss, stabilize blood sugar and even reduce the risk of chronic diseases.
I cant have flax seed, they trigger severe migraines. When i google replacing flax seeds or any thing else they say you need to know why they are added to the recipe for flavor and nutrition or as binders. In your recipes can you add some sort of code B for binding and F for flavor then its much easier to go about making substitutions. In this recipe is the flax for binding or flavor ? If its for binding can i add more eggs and how many ?
I love this recipe and I like to tweak things. I came up with a tweak to make banana bread. Since holiday baking is my weakness and I had an almost suicidal reaction to wheat (I really know I’m allergic now) I wanted some banana bread. I subbed 1 cup of almond flour to walnut flour, omitted the ACV, added sweetener to taste, 1 tsp vanilla, 1 tsp pumpkin pie spice (sugar free) and 1 mashed banana. I LOVE banana so I also added a little banana flavoring. Baked up to a heavenly bread that I can eat without bloating and severe mood reactions!! I LOVE this site for recipes!! My next attempt will be either pumpkin bread or orange cranberry. Makes a great “I NEED SWEET” snack or breakfast as I’m zooming out the door.
I made this recipe tonight – definitely the best tasting paleo bread I’ve had. The bread didn’t rise very much, so maybe I’d do a double recipe and cook longer to get bigger slices. It also turned out a little on the crumbly side – I think mine needed more liquid because the batter was fairly dry when I put it in the pan. As someone mentioned above, I also like that it’s not super eggy tasting! I gave slices to my roommates and a friend (they’re not paleo) and they both thought it was really good – which is sayin’ something! Next time I will try a few tweaks to make is sandwich suitable, but this recipe is really tasty.
While I haven’t made this recipe, I’ve used flaxmeal in a lot of muffin recipes, and on a occasion I’ve noticed those same gossamer-type strings after a few days. My best guess is it has something to do with flax, although I’m not sure what causes them to develop. Some recipes I use flaxmeal in never develop the strings, and some do, but it definitely only happens in breads where I use flaxmeal. I think the food is still safe to eat though! I wish I knew exactly what causes it too…
Cheryl, We use beef gelatin in this recipe to act as a binder and add a bit more chewiness to help simulate regular bread. (If you’re interested, we talk more about using beef gelatin in keto baking in this post: https://theketoqueens.com/crispy-low-carb-indian-flatbread-recipe/.) We haven’t experimented with this recipe to omit the beef gelatin, but you might be able to get a similar result using a bit more psyllium husk powder, flaxseed meal, ground chia seeds, xanthan gum, or guar gum. If you decide to play around with the recipe, please let us know how it goes! 
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