Several examples of recent and relatively speedy human evolution underscore that our anatomy and genetics have not been set in stone since the stone age. Within a span of 7,000 years, for instance, people adapted to eating dairy by developing lactose tolerance. Usually, the gene encoding an enzyme named lactase—which breaks down lactose sugars in milk—shuts down after infancy; when dairy became prevalent, many people evolved a mutation that kept the gene turned on throughout life. Likewise, the genetic mutation responsible for blue eyes likely arose between 6,000 and 10,000 years ago. And in regions where malaria is common, natural selection has modified people's immune systems and red blood cells in ways that help them resist the mosquito-borne disease; some of these genetic mutations appeared within the last 10,000 or even 5,000 years. The organisms with which we share our bodies have evolved even faster, particularly the billions of bacteria living in our intestines. Our gut bacteria interact with our food in many ways, helping us break down tough plant fibers, but also competing for calories. We do not have direct evidence of which bacterial species thrived in Paleolithic intestines, but we can be sure that their microbial communities do not exactly match our own.
I made the amended version, further substituting organic coconut sugar for the honey, and it is excellent! I made mine in a standard loaf pan in a convection oven and it reduced the baking time to 20 minutes. This is my first foray into paleo/anti-candida eating, and I’m excited at how tasty and satisfying this bread is. It is moist, dense and flavorful with a great texture. So glad I found your website!
Thank you for this recipe. This is so amazing – easy and delicious! I made it already three times today – the first time to see how it turns out, the other times because it was so good. My 10 years old son loved it and couldn’t stop eating it as a desert with a little maple syrup. He said that it tasted like Yorkshire pudding. In one of them I replaced the half spoon of butter with 1 tablespoon of unsweetened apple sauce – it became more moist and puffed up more than the others. I could still toast it in the toaster and was very good.
Interestingly, all of these seemingly unrelated diseases share a common cause: damage to the intestinal lining which allows large, undigested food particles to make their way into the body. This is called “leaky gut and the autoimmune response”. Here is a 7-part video series by Prof. Loren Cordain describing the etiology of Multiple Sclerosis. And please watch this TED talk by Dr. Terry Wahls, MD as she describes how she reversed her Multiple Sclerosis with a paleo diet. If you have an autoimmune disease you might consider trying the autoimmune protocol of the paleo diet. If you do, please tell us about your experience.
Hello, this bread recipe looks great, and I really want to make it for my dad who is intolerant to gluten and must settle with the sad and tiny store bought gluten free loaves. However, the only bread pan I have is one inch larger in dimensions, do you recommend increasing the recipe? Like doubling it or using 1.5 times the ingredients? Thank you :)
I have a question for you about eggs. Do you have any particular size or volume of “egg” that you tend to use in your recipes? In most of my cookbooks, an “egg” means a medium sized egg that yields about 50mls by volume, so there are slightly more than 5 eggs in a cup. I tend to buy extra large eggs locally, and I find that when a recipe calls for more than 3 eggs, the end result is quite “egg-y.” I’m going to experiment, but perhaps you would be able to tell me if there is a size or volume of egg that you tend to use in your recipes. (I didn’t see anything specific under the “ingredient” menu on your blog.)
And again, there’s no concrete scientific proof that the paleo diet wards off disease, Sandon says. Any evidence of its benefits is anecdotal. Although some studies seem to support the benefits of the paleo diet, many scientists still believe we don’t yet have enough evidence to know whether the eating approach is totally healthy and without risk. “Nobody knows the long-term effects of this diet because no one has researched it to any degree,” Sandon says. It’s not really a new concept; instead it’s one that’s been recycled through the years, she adds.
I have successfully made the Paleo bread twice & it worked out perfectly! However, when I made it recently, the edges of the bread were a gray color upon taking it out of the pan. When I sliced the bread & spread with raspberry jam (to resemble a tea cake), the jam turned blue-gray. I think it was some sort of acidic reaction. I did leave the bread in the pan for about 40 minutes after baking before releasing. Now I just remembered that I used rice vinegar (because I was out of cider). Maybe that caused the reaction? I used anodized aluminum pan by the brand “Fat Daddy.”

I have admired your blog and recipes for a while now. But as a “Paleo” devotee and blogger I am motivated to compliment you on this particular post. The first sentence about gluten free not necessarily meaning healthy is so true and has kept me from trying a lot of gluten free products and recipes. But my kids often request some sort of gluten free bread (kinda funny that kids would consider getting bread a treat!) I can’t wait to try this recipe because the ingredients are really wholesome -truly “Paleo”.
I just used a 9 x 5 pan and did not change the recipe proportions at all. Since this is the only loaf pan I have, instead, I pushed the dough against one side of the pan and formed a small loaf that is closer to the 7.5 x 3.5 pan size that Elana says to use. The dough was sticky enough to hold together fine and did not collapse or spread out during baking. It’s not the most beautiful creation, but it’s proportioned OK and tastes fine. I say – make it work with what you have and you’ll be alright.
I know that soy can cause inflammation and if you are not using soy free eggs, that could be part of the cause. It may not be the actual egg but the soy that is the problem. just a thought. Here is an article that has some interesting info on soy. http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/07/29/soy-effects-on-women.aspx?e_cid=20120729_SNL_Art_1
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