I am so looking for breads that work……….this does not……I have your books………..but the question about the ammonia…….they are an in your face issue…………for me, not till I sliced the loaf……but my nose is very sensitive….and I taste the amonia without ingesting the product…………my Mum, who has no sense of smell left, loved it…….. time to keep trying…………I am borderline diabetic, mum is, and my lover is in denial……………..so looking for something that passes as ‘bread’…………..thanks for the help………….luckylin……….
I’m on a low-FODMAP diet too. I just use pumpkin puree to replace apple sauce and it works in 98% recipes. Does make things a bit orange though ;). Other substitution ideas that I’ve used in other recipes are sweet potato puree (use white sweet potato so it’s not orange), yoghurt (I make mine with coconut milk), banana puree, or I’ve used water or milk + a little ground chia or linseed (a bit like a watery chia or flax egg). Hope you find something that works for you!

It sounds like Weevils. They make cobwebs in flour and flour baked goods and were the bane of the Sailors on long voyages for centuries. I have found using a large lidded container, plastic, metal, ceramic or whatever you have, and sprinkling Diatomaceous Earth inside and round the lid keeps all my different flours healthy and hygienic. Diatomaceous Earth is a natural silica like powder which can even be taken internally, and totally dehydrates any bugs etc leaving them very dead. I use it in my chicken run and even on my cats and in their food. It keeps them healthy and parasite free. It is a sustainable, non chemical product – just check its Food grade before buying it. I guess they seell it in the US. It’s used a lot here in the UK.
Hi Slee, there are many variations of the Paleo diet and many people do eat dairy for it’s health benefits. This isn’t a diet, but more of a guide to help people with different goals and health problems. We focus on eliminating processed foods and those that cause inflammation, and we focus on eating nutrient-dense foods. So although it’s true that some of the enzymes in the yogurt die during baking at certain temperatures, we are still training our minds to look for nutritions foods. This is especially important for people starting out with this way of eating and living.
Eat generous amounts of saturated fats like coconut oil and butter or clarified butter. Beef tallow, lard and duck fat are also good, but only if they come from healthy and well-treated animals. Beef or lamb tallow is a better choice than lamb or duck fat. Olive, avocado and macadamia oil are also good fats to use in salads and to drizzle over food, but not for cooking. For more information, have a look at our beginner’s guide to Paleo and fat.
Good Calories, Bad Calories: Fats, Carbs, and the Controversial Science of Diet and Health by Gary Taubes expounds on his 2002 article in the NY Times (What if It's All Been a Big Fat Lie?) and then in Science Magazine (see below). He shows how public health data has been misinterpreted to mark dietary fat and cholesterol as the primary causes of coronary heart disease. Deeper examination, he says, shows that heart disease and other diseases of civilization appear to result from increased consumption of refined carbohydrates: sugar, white flour and white rice. Or in other words, without using the word Paleolithic, he justifies the paleo diet. Here is an excellent chapter by chapter summary of the book [archive.org].
Nutrition & Physical Degeneration by Dr. Weston Price's book puts to rest a lot of myths about diet, dental, physical, and emotional health, and presents the strongest case for a super-nutritious Native (or Paleo) Diet. His book outlines the conditions/causes for exceptional health. A classic that was first published in 1938. The Soil and Health Library has a Book Review by Steve Solomon. If you don't buy the book at least read the review. N.B. If you live in one of the countries where this book is now in the public domain, you can read it online. But not if you live in a country where it is still under copyright protection.
The Paleo Diet Cookbook: More than 150 recipes for Paleo Breakfasts, Lunches, Dinners, Snacks, and Beverages by Loren Cordain. Also contains two weeks of meal plans and shopping and pantry tips. Helps you lose weight and boost your health and energy by focusing on lean protein and non-starchy vegetables and fruits. Note that this is a very low-fat book and is being marketed as such. Published December 7, 2010.
A more controversial argument for why legumes and common grains are avoided is because of their high phytic acid content, which is thought to reduce the absorption of certain nutrients like iron zinc and calcium (6). However, phytic acid is also found in many paleo approved foods (like almonds and hazelnuts), and is associated with some health benefits - like protective benefits against kidney stones, antioxidant properties and a suggested link to lower risk for colon cancer (7,8,9). Bottom line, there really isn't any evidenced based reason to avoid these foods because of phytic acid. 
While the diet as a whole hasn't been well studied, the benefits of cutting packaged foods from your diet could be huge. According to the Harvard School of Public Health, three quarters of the average American's sodium intake (which is almost double what it should be!) comes from commercially prepared foods. And, one Public Health Nutrition study found that people who cook at least five times a week are 47% more likely to be alive 10 years later compared to those who rely more on processed foods.
Hi! I eventually used flaxseed meal, as the recipe suggested so that could not have been it. I eventually made another loaf the next day, using the left over dry mixture I had, adding some more almond flour, and golden flaxseed meal. Essentially I reduced the ratio of the dry ingredients to give the loaf a more spreadable texture. That seemed to work, although I cannot remember exactly the ratio in which the dry ingredients were reduced! memo to self: make notes IMMEDIATELY.
Thanks for the recipe! I actually made it this morning, but instead of making it as a loaf bread, I cooked the batter up pancake style. Mostly because I wanted “bread” quickly! I really wanted a BLT for breakfast so using your batter as a pancake, made it cook quickly. Then I quickly whipped up some homemade mayo and fried some bacon. What a tasty breakfast! Thanks again!!
According to the model from the evolutionary discordance hypothesis, "[M]any chronic diseases and degenerative conditions evident in modern Western populations have arisen because of a mismatch between Stone Age genes and modern lifestyles."[26] Advocates of the modern Paleo diet have formed their dietary recommendations based on this hypothesis. They argue that modern humans should follow a diet that is nutritionally closer to that of their Paleolithic ancestors.

There were some recipes I tried that were decent enough and definitely passable as bread-like concoctions, but nothing was stellar. Or even good enough to warrant making a second time (IMHO). And there were also a few loaves that were actually pretty bad in different ways – either the flavor and/or the texture was just off – that ended up only being fit for the garbage (definitely a sad thing). But that’s how we learn, right?
As for the mixing…I mixed the dry ingredients in one bowl, then separated the egg yolks and whites, in bowls. I whipped the whites until they were thick. I added the yolks to the whites, and added the honey and oil. I mixed that up. I added the wet to the dry and mixed. It was really thick. Then I combined the baking soda and vinegar, mixing them. I added them to the whole mix and slightly stirred.
I love this bread!!! Because of this bread, I can eat a sandwich now and then and not be in pain from gluten and additives. I’ve also made it into French toast and it came out great. Dairy is a problem food for me, so I substitute the butter for coconut oil and use coconut cream in place of yogurt. I freeze this bread in half loaves so I always have some on hand. Delicious!!

As of 2016 there are limited data on the metabolic effects on humans eating a Paleo diet, but the data are based on clinical trials that have been too small to have a statistical significance sufficient to allow the drawing of generalizations.[3][6][20][not in citation given] These preliminary trials have found that participants eating a paleo nutrition pattern had better measures of cardiovascular and metabolic health than people eating a standard diet,[3][9] though the evidence is not strong enough to recommend the Paleo diet for treatment of metabolic syndrome.[9] As of 2014 there was no evidence the paleo diet is effective in treating inflammatory bowel disease.[21]
Tapioca Flour: Also called tapioca starch, tapioca flour is made from the root of the cassava plant. Tapioca flour is nearly flavorless, so it’s good for using in both sweet and savory recipes. In paleo baking, this flour helps lighten up and improve the texture of paleo baked goods and make them a bit springier, and also helps with browning. This is why I like using it along with other denser paleo flours, such as almond flour.
There were some recipes I tried that were decent enough and definitely passable as bread-like concoctions, but nothing was stellar. Or even good enough to warrant making a second time (IMHO). And there were also a few loaves that were actually pretty bad in different ways – either the flavor and/or the texture was just off – that ended up only being fit for the garbage (definitely a sad thing). But that’s how we learn, right?
I’ve perused your bread recipe offerings (which I hadn’t really looked at previously since we mostly just opt-out of bread-type products) and am wondering which you would most recommend as a kid-pleaser to try in the challah mold. Additionally, I am wondering if you’ve ever played around with a potato-based bread option? I would prefer something that is not entirely flour based (including nut flours), if it is possible . . .
I’m on a low-FODMAP diet too. I just use pumpkin puree to replace apple sauce and it works in 98% recipes. Does make things a bit orange though ;). Other substitution ideas that I’ve used in other recipes are sweet potato puree (use white sweet potato so it’s not orange), yoghurt (I make mine with coconut milk), banana puree, or I’ve used water or milk + a little ground chia or linseed (a bit like a watery chia or flax egg). Hope you find something that works for you!
Alina Bradford is a contributing writer for Live Science. Over the past 16 years, Alina has covered everything from Ebola to androids while writing health, science and tech articles for major publications. She has multiple health, safety and lifesaving certifications from Oklahoma State University. Alina's goal in life is to try as many experiences as possible. To date, she has been a volunteer firefighter, a dispatcher, substitute teacher, artist, janitor, children's book author, pizza maker, event coordinator and much more.
I am so looking for breads that work……….this does not……I have your books………..but the question about the ammonia…….they are an in your face issue…………for me, not till I sliced the loaf……but my nose is very sensitive….and I taste the amonia without ingesting the product…………my Mum, who has no sense of smell left, loved it…….. time to keep trying…………I am borderline diabetic, mum is, and my lover is in denial……………..so looking for something that passes as ‘bread’…………..thanks for the help………….luckylin……….
Hi Broke, so there are a few things that could be affecting the texture of your bread. First, do you have an oven thermometer to make sure the temperature is where you need it to be? This could affect the baking time. It’s ok if you need to bake it longer, and I would let it cook until you test the middle of the bread with a stick inserted into the center. Only when it comes out clean you remove it from the oven.
You’ll stay pretty full on the Paleo diet. Nutrition experts emphasize the importance of satiety, the satisfied feeling that you’ve had enough. You shouldn’t feel hungry on this diet – protein and fiber are filling, and you’ll get plenty of both. One small study of 29 participants published in Nutrition & Metabolism in 2010 found Paleo dieters felt just as full but consumed fewer calories than their Mediterranean counterparts.
Whether you follow a paleo diet or not, these recipes are the perfect bites of indulgence for your sweet tooth. I included a mix of cookies, muffins and bars packed with better-for-you ingredients (and plenty of dark chocolate) that you can look forward to after a long day. Why? Because I think you should treat yo’ self every day – however that may be. For me it’s usually something topped with my favorite nut butter and/or a drizzle of chocolate, and for you it might be a fluffy slice of banana bread. Take a scroll, pick your favorite, and treat yourself to something delicious today!
I have recently discovered your website and I’m so pleased that I did. There is so much content there. It’s the bread I’m particularly interested in at this point since I have not had any bread for about two and a half years so I went straight there. I tried your world famous paleo bread and I must say it was very nice. However it does not look like your bread in that mine was much darker and much denser. I tried to find a comment where you addressed this issue but I only got as far as some comments regarding the height of the bread. You stated that the tin size was most likely incorrect. I’m sure my tin as a bit on the big side but when I look at the pic of your bread I can see yours is a much lighter bread than mine and also much lighter in colour.
Hi everyone, I made this bread and it smelled AMAZING baking, but as soon as I cut into it, I got The Smell. It’s a bit like ammonia, but even more, to me, it smells EXACTLY like Nickelodeon Gak (anyone else remember that from the 90s?). I can sortof taste it as well. It’s quite disappointing after using all the almond flour and eggs, but it’s just not edible to me.
Ostensibly, Grok is "a rather typical hunter–gatherer" living before the dawn of agriculture—an "official primal prototype." He is the poster-persona for fitness author and blogger Mark Sisson's "Primal Blueprint"—a set of guidelines that "allows you to control how your genes express themselves in order to build the strongest, leanest, healthiest body possible, taking clues from evolutionary biology (that's the primal part)." These guidelines incorporate many principles of what is more commonly known as the Paleolithic, or caveman, diet, which started to whet people's appetites as early as the 1960s and is available in many different flavors today.
Even if eating only foods available to hunter–gatherers in the Paleolithic made sense, it would be impossible. As Christina Warinner of the University of Zurich emphasizes in her 2012 TED talk, just about every single species commonly consumed today—whether a fruit, vegetable or animal—is drastically different from its Paleolithic predecessor. In most cases, we have transformed the species we eat through artificial selection: we have bred cows, chickens and goats to provide as much meat, milk and eggs as possible and have sown seeds only from plants with the most desirable traits—with the biggest fruits, plumpest kernels, sweetest flesh and fewest natural toxins. Cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts and kale are all different cultivars of a single species, Brassica oleracea; generation by generation, we reshaped this one plant's leaves, stems and flowers into wildly different arrangements, the same way we bred Welsh corgis, pugs, dachshunds, Saint Bernards and greyhounds out of a single wolf species. Corn was once a straggly grass known as teosinte and tomatoes were once much smaller berries. And the wild ancestors of bananas were rife with seeds.

I really do hope you read this. It may make a difference to some people. I know it makes a huge difference to me. I tried your paleo bread recipe and several other bread recipes on other websites. I kept tasting a bitter undertone in the bread. Every time it would just make me gag. I finally figured it out that it’s the almond flour. It makes sense now, since almonds DO have a bitter aftertaste. But it usually doesn’t matter when using whole or chopped almonds. So I tried your paleo bread recipe by replacing it with cashew flour. I had to make the flour myself in the vitamix blender, but it worked real well. AT LAST, NO BITTER UNDERTONE! I recommend informing people that cashew flour is an alternative. The only problem I have now is that it still doesn’t have that wheat bread taste. I tried increasing the flax seed meal to 1/2 cup and reducing the cashew flour to 1 3/4 cups but the flax seed meal still didn’t shine through. I know flax seed meal has the potential to create the taste. I intend to increase it further in my next attempt. BTW, I’m not worried about the phytoestrogens in flax seed because my naturopathic doctor says it doesn’t act like real estrogen.


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Diane, I have successfully made this recipe with almond “milk” and cow’s milk (both whole milk and 2% milk work), but I haven’t tried this recipe with hemp milk or coconut milk. If you want to play with it, I would try hemp milk because the higher fat content of coconut milk may significantly alter the recipe. If you give it a try, let me know how it goes!

We cannot time travel and join our Paleo ancestors by the campfire as they prepare to eat; likewise, shards of ancient pottery and fossilized teeth can tell us only so much. If we compare the diets of so-called modern hunter-gatherers, however, we see just how difficult it is to find meaningful commonalities and extract useful dietary guidelines from their disparate lives (see infographic). Which hunter–gatherer tribe are we supposed to mimic, exactly? How do we reconcile the Inuit diet—mostly the flesh of sea mammals—with the more varied plant and land animal diet of the Hadza or !Kung? Chucking the many different hunter–gather diets into a blender to come up with some kind of quintessential smoothie is a little ridiculous. "Too often modern health problems are portrayed as the result of eating 'bad' foods that are departures from the natural human diet…This is a fundamentally flawed approach to assessing human nutritional needs," Leonard wrote. "Our species was not designed to subsist on a single, optimal diet. What is remarkable about human beings is the extraordinary variety of what we eat. We have been able to thrive in almost every ecosystem on the Earth, consuming diets ranging from almost all animal foods among populations of the Arctic to primarily tubers and cereal grains among populations in the high Andes.”
Five roots, both bitter and sweet, are staples in the Hiwi diet, as are palm nuts and palm hearts, several different fruits, a wild legume named Campsiandra comosa, and honey produced by several bee species and sometimes by wasps. A few Hiwi families tend small, scattered and largely unproductive fields of plantains, corn and squash. At neighboring cattle ranches in a town about 30 kilometers away, some Hiwi buy rice, noodles, corn flour and sugar. Anthropologists and tourists have also given the Hiwi similar processed foods as gifts (see illustration at top).
Paleo bread fantastic, I truly believe this is the best I’ve ever made, I used Tupelo honey and Braggs raw unfiltered vinegar and it really masked the over egginess that sometimes comes with paleo bread, it toasted up great, thanks for all your hard work you give such great alternatives for a grain free diet, love the date nut bar it’s always a hit at work.

Thank you for so much for experimenting until you developed this delicious recipe! We (me, husband, 12yo daughter, 10yo son) just finished Paleo restart, 30 days. My son has been so desperate to have bread, now he can have nut butter & homemade jelly sandwiches! He’s ecstatic…me too! ???? ???? ???? Thanks for sharing…it’s because of people like you that are making this journey not so overwhelming!
Here is your chance to make pumpkin bagels that can help usher in fall, and also are great any time of the year. They are made with real pumpkin of course, as well as a host of additional ingredients to make them taste great without being bad for you in any way. Just be sure to follow the Paleo instructions, as this is a multi-purpose recipe but they’ve included the necessary substitutes to keep it Paleo. These taste great with grass-fed butter on them, and you can even try using a Paleo-friendly cream cheese if you feel up to it.

If you don’t have a wood stove with a proper warming oven up top – who does these days? – then try my never-fail trick for proofing yeast: Turn on the oven light 10-15 minutes before you begin to proof your yeast. Once your yeast/water/maple syrup mix is stirred, pop the container in the upper half of your oven and close the door. It’s warm, draft free, and as long as your water is the correct temperature and your yeast is still viable, this works every time.


In any case, I was finally able to have a little sample of bread and butter which was thrilling and so yummy. I originally intended to make turkey sandwiches with the loaf, but may end up repurposing it. It would make some great croutons for the Gnom-Gnom stuffing recipe. But I can also see some bruschetta in my near future. By cutting the loaf horizontally, I think I can still manage to get at least one turkey sandwich out of it this week. That’s if I don’t keep sneaking little slices for bread and butter 😉
Alyssa, one more thing. Both the bowl and the beaters need to be spotlessly clean. If there is one hint of oil anywhere the whites will not beat properly. Nicole is correct about not using a plastic bowl. Plastic will even absorb oil to say nothing of the microscopic amounts that get into the surface when it’s scratched. When baking it is always best to use a metal or glass bowl for all of your mixing.
Hello! I was wondering if you had ever doubled or tripled the recipe in order to use a standard size loaf pan? I wasn’t paying attention to the size and made a regular recipe in a standard loaf pan and the results were, well, flat. Then I realized my goof. Hoping to avoid the purchase of another pan, but will definitely buy a new one if it means I can make this bread!
Hi Becky! If you use the recommended size baking pan, the bread will be the proper height and you will be able to use it for sandwiches. If you use a pan that is bigger than the one I used, your bread won’t fill the pan up. Here’s an example –if you place 1/2 cup of water in a 1/2 measuring cup it will be 100% full to the top of the cup. If you put the same 1/2 cup of water in a 1 cup measuring cup it will only fill it 50% and will only be 1/2 full in height. That’s why a loaf pan that is too large doesn’t work for this recipe when it comes to the height of the loaf :-)
Our keto bread recipe has a beautiful golden crust. It has great structure with a lovely rise and perfect bread-like crumb. It slices well for sandwiches or toasting, but you don’t have to toast or grill it to make it taste good. Sliced with a smear of salted butter is keto perfection. And it actually tastes like bread, not eggs or almonds or coconut. Additionally, this bread will keep well wrapped in the fridge for up to a week!
In his 1988 book "The Paleolithic Prescription," Eaton and his co-authors argued that humans are ill-suited to modern diets because the large part of a human's genetic makeup was established thousands of years ago in pre-agricultural societies. Eaton and other advocates of the Paleo diet believe that many modern diseases are a result of today's eating habits.
This is one of the best gluten-free bread recipes I’ve tried. I made mine in a 9 x 5 loaf pan. It’s a little vertically challenged, but it still tastes good and has a nice texture to it. I’m a recovering carb-junkie who realized the one thing I craved most was likely a factor in decades worth of digestive grief. As an experiment, I eliminated wheat products from my diet and my digestive health has shown significant improvement. But I have so missed my morning toast with peanut butter. This bread is a great replacement, one that’s both tasty and nutritious (unlike store bought GF bread). It’s delicious with peanut butter, jam, butter, or just on its own. Thank you for the wonderful recipe!
I’ve used mini bread pans and small springform pans, square cake pans, clay loaf pans, USA pans, and I recently tried an extra-long loaf pan, equivalent of 2 loaves in 1 pan. I’ve substituted other nut flours (pistachio, hazelnut), other oils (olive, almond, hazelnut, butter) other liquids, including buttermilk, my current favorite, added seasoning ingredients, such as olives, sun-dried tomatoes, fresh and dried herbs and seasonings, tried it with caraway, dill, and a little tamarind powder for a “rye” flavor. Topped it with pine nuts or sesame seeds And of course we’ve enjoyed it many times over just as the recipe is written.
One of the foods that people tell us they miss most after going keto is bread. (And cookies or cakes, but you get the idea.) We get it, bread is undeniably comfort food. Growing up, it wasn’t unheard of to eat toast for breakfast, a sandwich for lunch, and maybe even a slice of buttered bread along with dinner. Not only is that ton of carbs, but it’s also a lot of empty calories when we could have been eating real-food alternatives, like this bread made from nutrient-dense ingredients!
My bread came out a teeny bit “eggy”…which wasn’t bad, I still enjoyed it. Maybe some egg yolk made it in the batter??? Anyway, the slight egginess made me think of French toast. So with the last few pieces, that’s what I made. I mixed an egg, heavy cream, and a little vanilla to coat the bread…used browned butter to sub for syrup…then topped off with Swerve confectioners sugar. It was delicious!
I’m so glad you love it, Tanya! Yes, $17 sounds like a lot for xanthan gum. I use this one here. Swerve is sweeter than erythritol, so you’d need less of it – I have a conversion chart here. You’re absolutely right about the xanthan gum and texture – it will make the bread more chewy. It will still be more of a “light and fluffy” bread, but definitely less muffin-like with the xanthan gum. I haven’t tried add-ins yet – let me know how it goes if you try!
I just put this bread together and I think something is missing in the ingredients? It did not “pour” into bread pan as recipe suggests, it was more like a crumbly dough. I went over my steps again and again and can’t find any steps or measurements I missed. Has anyone made this yet? I have it in the oven any way as I’m not very good at figuring out what to do, so I hope it turns out! Elana, I am truly enjoying your almond flour cook book and your website is so inspiring! Thanx!
Hi Lina, the secret to baking perfectly with almond flour is by using the “right” kind almond flour. This means your almond flour should be ground into fine powder and have the skin removed. There are only a few brands I recommend. Both Honeyville and Welbee’s blanched almond flour work well for baking. Bob’s Red Mill brand will not works, it creates oily, dense baked goods that also sink in the middle.

Thank you so much for this recipe. I haven t had bread since starting Paleo about 3 1/2 months ago. Then my husband asked me to make him Zucchini Blueberry Bread, which I find irresistible. I made his bread last night then found this recipe. I made it today. I added some shredded zucchini and a handful of blueberries to it. It appeared done after 90 seconds but had a raw section inside. So I simply microwaved it a little more. It was absolutely delicious. Thanks again.


I just made this and it tastes like brushing my teeth with baking soda! Thank goodness I tasted the batter before it went into the oven. I added an extra 1 1/2 tablespoons of honey, then 1 teaspoon of vanilla to try to cut the bakingsoda flavor. I didn’t know what else to do- I didn’t want a sweet loaf but it was too astringent to eat. I ended up with a neutral (not sweet) tasting loaf that still tasted soda-ish. Very metallic tasting.

My quest has been bread with more than 5 gr fiber. Chia flour is what I have found. I substitute it for 1/3 of the flour in a recipe and it does the trick. It is lavender though and does tend to make my sandwich bread a little grey. But it is very pretty in blue berry muffins and pancakes. I grind my own rice flour, millet and corn flour and it makes a huge difference.
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