A 2015 study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology found that 76 people who followed the Paleo diet for 60 days (as well as those who followed vegan, Mediterranean and DASH plans for the same length of time) lost an average of 9 pounds and showed improvement in their blood pressure levels. The effects were greatest and most sustained among people who also attended regular diet support group meetings.
I think red meat from grain fed cattle and sheep IS bad for us . These animals were designed to eat grass. We were designed to eat meat, fat, vegetables , a few seeds and a little seasonal fruit. But never any kind of grain. ! When Man began farming and grain consumption , so began disease and illness. Today our food supply is being contaminated by Factory farming and GMOs.
In fact, the health benefits of the paleo diet are unproven. "Our ancestors ate this way and didn't have many of the chronic diseases we do, but that doesn't mean the food they ate is the reason why; drawing that conclusion would be like saying we live three times longer than our Paleolithic ancestors because we eat fast food," says Christopher Ochner, MD, research associate at the New York Obesity Nutrition Research Center at St. Luke's and Roosevelt Hospitals. Still, a handful of small studies have tried to determine if a paleo diet is a healthier diet. One small study published in the journal Diabetologia found that the diet improved blood sugar over 12 weeks compared to a Mediterranean one that allowed grains, low-fat dairy, and oils, but it's hard to say whether researchers would come to the same results in a larger study.

Thank you so much for this recipe! I have tried so many paleo bread recipes and this is the best one yet. My husband devoured half of it and he’s a very picky eater. I’m going to double the recipe next time so I can use my larger bread pan. I do have one question though. Do you think this recipe would work if I added bananas, or blueberries? I was thinking of doing that but wasn’t sure if that would effect the consistency.
About 3 years ago I went grain free for the second time in my life. At that time I downloaded about 20 grain free bread recipes three were good and edible and could withstand the rigors of actual lunch meat/sandwich making, but this one has stood the test of time. This is the recipe I go back to every time, it delicious and passes the sandwich test. Here s what I have learned: I like to make a double batch, I like to beat the wet ingredients into a stiff foam, everything works best at room temperature, the baking time is about an hour in a glass pyrex loaf pan, It MUST be stored in the fridge wrapped in a paper towel then in a zippy bag, it needs to be toasted for sandwiches. I make this bread for non grain-free friends and neighbors and they love it too.
Divya, I’m happy to hear the flavor was great, but sorry to hear the bread was flat! I’ll try to help you troubleshoot…first I would check to make sure that your baking powder is fresh. Also, did you use the full cup of egg whites? Did you use a 9 by 5-inch loaf pan? Did you cook it at 350F and is your oven properly calibrated? Did you bake it for the amount of time the recipe calls for?
I am currently looking for a recipe to try in my recently acquired, but not-yet-used silicone challah mold (https://www.amazon.com/Amazing-Perfect-Silicone-Bakeware-Braiding/dp/B005NAGY8O). Our family eats gluten-free, with a strong leaning towards a whole foods/Paleo diet. My husband and I are happy to enjoy a Shabbat dinner sans challah, though our 8- and 5-year-old daughters are very disappointed (especially when we are at synagogue and we ask them not to have any of the challah) to be missing out.
Hi Adriana, thank you for this recipe. My youngest son has to eat gluten free and I’m trying to find a recipe for bread that he really likes (none so far). It’s just in the oven and I hope it turns out okay, because the batter wasn’t a batter, it was more of a dough… I followed your recipe to the letter: same ingredients, no overmixing… Do you have any idea what could have happened?
Several examples of recent and relatively speedy human evolution underscore that our anatomy and genetics have not been set in stone since the stone age. Within a span of 7,000 years, for instance, people adapted to eating dairy by developing lactose tolerance. Usually, the gene encoding an enzyme named lactase—which breaks down lactose sugars in milk—shuts down after infancy; when dairy became prevalent, many people evolved a mutation that kept the gene turned on throughout life. Likewise, the genetic mutation responsible for blue eyes likely arose between 6,000 and 10,000 years ago. And in regions where malaria is common, natural selection has modified people's immune systems and red blood cells in ways that help them resist the mosquito-borne disease; some of these genetic mutations appeared within the last 10,000 or even 5,000 years. The organisms with which we share our bodies have evolved even faster, particularly the billions of bacteria living in our intestines. Our gut bacteria interact with our food in many ways, helping us break down tough plant fibers, but also competing for calories. We do not have direct evidence of which bacterial species thrived in Paleolithic intestines, but we can be sure that their microbial communities do not exactly match our own.
This recipe looks wonderful, Elana! Till now, I made an all-almond flour bread and even though it was semi-sweet and delicious, it was also dense and chunky. Just last weekend, I caught myself wondering – what if I were to add just a bit of coconut flour to create some fluffiness? And then I started fretting about the proportions and decided to sleep on it for a few nights and postpone my kitchen adventures till next weekend.

Of course, this is just the basic of basic recipes, and you can spice it up with some Italian seasoning or some fruit mixed into the batter. When making the basic bread, I’ve found that my favorite way of eating this Paleo bread is with a hot bowl of chilli, but it also tastes great with some paleo jam or dipped in some soup. It’s not the best bread you’ve ever had, but it’s pretty good for 6 and 1/2 minutes of cooking!
Hi Sonda, glad you like it! I use a free nutrition calculator on the website sparkrecipes.com, which generates the nutrition table. You just put in all your ingredients and number of portions and it does the rest of the work for you. I cannot guarantee whatever comes out is 100% accurate, it is thought to be a guide. If you need to rely on nutrition info for health reasons, you’d have to make your own calculations.
There has been so much nutrition and dietary mis-information in the past 100 years, it’s very confusing to sort it all out. I’m thankful I found Paleo! And as paleo shoppers, we know to avoid the center of the market and stick to the outside loop which is where we find the lean proteins, the nuts, seeds, greens, vegetables and fruits. It not only saves us time when we shop, it keeps us healthy.
I’ve made this in my bread machine several times, and it comes out beautifully. I double the recipe, choose the quick bread setting and it produces a nice 1 kilo loaf (2.2 pounds). I’m using a Kenwood model BM450 as I’m in the UK, but I think the same machine is marketed in the US by DeLonghi, if anyone wants to compare specifications. I just dump all the ingredients in the pan in order, and give a couple of stirs around the edges of the pan with a spatula while its on the mix cycle (though I’m not sure if its even necessary), and that’s it.
The New Evolution Diet: What Our Paleolithic Ancestors Can Teach Us about Weight Loss, Fitness, and Aging by Arthur De Vany. Art is the grandfather of the "Paleo Lifestyle" movement. The plan is built on three principles: (1) eat three meals a day made up of nonstarchy vegetables, fruits, and lean proteins; (2) skip meals occasionally to promote a low fasting blood insulin level; and (3) exercise less, not more, in shorter, high-intensity bursts. Note that the book is anti-fat. All oils are to be avoided, though canola is considered okay for higher temperatures. Egg yolks are to be skipped now and then. Published December 21, 2010.
Hi Mindy – same here. But I did read in a comment about 1 or 2 years ago the same thing. From what I remember from those comments, others said the type of food we make from Elana’s baked recipes are just not designed to sit for more than 2 – 3 days. Other commenters chimed in and said their family eats up everything they bake, so nothing sits long enough to get the 3-day-old smell.
I just went through a big move and definitely got out of my paleo rhythm 🙁 I decided it was time to kick my butt back into it and scoured the web for a great paleo bread recipe. I found yours and it had so many great reviews so I had to give it a shot– I’m SO glad I did! I made this bread tonight and it’ turned out awesome! The taste is amazing and the texture is absolutely perfect! My roommates who aren’t paleo loved it so much as well! I can’t wait to try more of your recipes 🙂
Thank you thank you thank you! 🙂 My kids and my husband do paleo but they do miss sandwiches on occasion and I hate buying gluten free bread. Never tastes right, has weird texture, very expensive, and they still have funky ingredients! I’m always on the hunt for good paleo bread recipes and have found few but I’m always excited when I see one that looks to be very promising! Will be trying this tonight for lunches this week.
I’ve made the Paleo Almond Bread recipe twice now and it was delicous, but I was wondering how to make it rise more. I changed the 1-1/2 tsps. baking soda to 1 tsp. baking soda and 1/2 tsp. baking powder. Instead of adding the 5 eggs at once I added 4 plus the egg yolk of the fifth egg. I beat the leftover egg white until frothy and folded it in at the end. It worked for me! Turned out delicious!
Finally found the recommended loaf size and could hardly wait to make this paleo bread. After 45 minutes and the toothpick coming out clean, removed it from the oven. After it cooled, cut it to serve and had two inches on either end and about a half an inch on the top and bottom that were edible. The middle consisted of what I would call an empty tunnel about the size of a silver dollar and surrounded by uncooked batter. Yuck. What’s so interesting is I made your Scrumptious Sandwich bread out of your book, and it turned out perfectly. I’ve been baking a LONG time, and I can’t even speculate as to what happened to this loaf. Did I have a massive air bubble in the middle, and, if so, why? Did using the food processor affect it? Any light you can shed on this will be greatly appreciated. I’ve been experimenting with the recipes in this cookbook and loving it. Please help me understand what happened to this paleo bread.
We cannot time travel and join our Paleo ancestors by the campfire as they prepare to eat; likewise, shards of ancient pottery and fossilized teeth can tell us only so much. If we compare the diets of so-called modern hunter-gatherers, however, we see just how difficult it is to find meaningful commonalities and extract useful dietary guidelines from their disparate lives (see infographic). Which hunter–gatherer tribe are we supposed to mimic, exactly? How do we reconcile the Inuit diet—mostly the flesh of sea mammals—with the more varied plant and land animal diet of the Hadza or !Kung? Chucking the many different hunter–gather diets into a blender to come up with some kind of quintessential smoothie is a little ridiculous. "Too often modern health problems are portrayed as the result of eating 'bad' foods that are departures from the natural human diet…This is a fundamentally flawed approach to assessing human nutritional needs," Leonard wrote. "Our species was not designed to subsist on a single, optimal diet. What is remarkable about human beings is the extraordinary variety of what we eat. We have been able to thrive in almost every ecosystem on the Earth, consuming diets ranging from almost all animal foods among populations of the Arctic to primarily tubers and cereal grains among populations in the high Andes.”
Protein is a staple of the caveman diet- specifically options that are grass-fed, wild caught or organic, as these options are often from animals raised in environments that encourage natural behavior. And because our ancestors didn't just live off chicken and beef, they hunted a wide variety of meat, the more variety you can add to your proteins, the better!
Our bodies need much more protein than the average person consumes. In fact, protein accounts for only 15 percent of the average person’s daily calories, while 19 to 35 percent of the average hunter-gatherer diet was comprised of protein. This was due to the high consumption of meat, seafood, and other animal products prevalent in contemporary approaches to Paleo eating.

The following links tend towards news reports of scientific studies that point out some positive aspect of the paleo diet. If you are looking for current news reports, I suggest signing up for Google Alerts for the Type: News. I have three set up, for: "caveman diet," "paleo diet," and "paleolithic diet." You can also set them up for blogs and/or websites.

A more controversial argument for why legumes and common grains are avoided is because of their high phytic acid content, which is thought to reduce the absorption of certain nutrients like iron zinc and calcium (6). However, phytic acid is also found in many paleo approved foods (like almonds and hazelnuts), and is associated with some health benefits - like protective benefits against kidney stones, antioxidant properties and a suggested link to lower risk for colon cancer (7,8,9). Bottom line, there really isn't any evidenced based reason to avoid these foods because of phytic acid. 

Hi, I’ve made this recipe twice and LOVE the taste. However, both times the bread would rise so high in the oven, but as soon as I take it out to cool it deflated and middle sink down. What could’ve gone wrong? Over mixing? I did switch coconut flour to all almond flour instead. Could that be a problem? Please help as I’m anxious to make another batch. Thank you.


Hi Melissa, Are you beating the whole eggs? It needs to be egg whites only. Whole eggs will never form peaks. Adding a little cream of tartar helps, as well as making sure you start with a very clean bowl (preferably not plastic if you’re having issues). Having the egg whites at room temperature can be a little easier, too, though I usually don’t need to. Hope this answers your question!
Finally made this recipe, is my second bread recipe I’ve made and the top is nice but the inside always feels moist … I am putting it in the oven a bit more to see if it dries out, is that the texture that it should have because of the butter or what? I liked the flavor! Just not sure of how is supposed to be inside. I haven’t watched the video yet. Thanks!!
Hi John, You could possible try a hand mixer in a bowl instead of the food processor, but I haven’t tried it, so can’t vouch for the results. Most likely the bread would not be as tall because the mixer would completely deflate the first half of the egg whites when you add them to the batter. The second half should be folded so that part will be find. If you try with a bowl and hand mixer, let me know how that goes.
Diane, I have successfully made this recipe with almond “milk” and cow’s milk (both whole milk and 2% milk work), but I haven’t tried this recipe with hemp milk or coconut milk. If you want to play with it, I would try hemp milk because the higher fat content of coconut milk may significantly alter the recipe. If you give it a try, let me know how it goes!

I was hesitant at first to try to make the bread because I didn’t want to waste the expensive ingredients. Well the bread taste even better. It doesn’t have any eggy flavor. It actually taste better than any paleo bread I’ve ever had. It was a little dense and didn’t rise as much but it was a first try with seed flour. I did have a reaction from the seeds and the baking soda. Green spots lol. My neighbor said it was the best I have ever made. It will need some tweaking. So Adriana if you find a better way to make this rise better please let me know. It was also a little greasy but just a little. I. Trying pumpkin seeds next. Thank you so much for giving us a great bread recipe that is so versitile. if anyone finds a way to improve this please let me know. You will be very happy if you try this with sunflower seed flour.


Carol: For anyone gluten intolerant, or worse, that’s a given. What quickly becomes apparent to anyone providing for this aspect of diet and reads labels, is that commercially available i.e. highly processed versions of bread etc are ridiculously loaded with poor quality fats, sugars and yet other refined flours etc to ‘compensate’ for wheat comfort. No, gluten free food, as in what is usually available to mimic where flour is widely used ‘n’ enjoyed in bought ready-to-eat products, is far from healthy…. why we’re here!
Advocates of the diet argue that the increase in diseases of affluence after the dawn of agriculture was caused by changes in diet, but others have countered that it may be that pre-agricultural hunter-gatherers did not suffer from the diseases of affluence because they did not live long enough to develop them.[30] Based on the data from hunter-gatherer populations still in existence, it is estimated that at age 15, life expectancy was an additional 39 years, for a total age of 54.[31] At age 45, it is estimated that average life expectancy was an additional 19 years, for a total age of 64 years.[32][33] That is to say, in such societies, most deaths occurred in childhood or young adulthood; thus, the population of elderly – and the prevalence of diseases of affluence – was much reduced. Excessive food energy intake relative to energy expended, rather than the consumption of specific foods, is more likely to underlie the diseases of affluence. "The health concerns of the industrial world, where calorie-packed foods are readily available, stem not from deviations from a specific diet but from an imbalance between the energy humans consume and the energy humans spend."[34]
Hi Meredith, every photo I share with my recipes are from the same recipe. I usually photograph the food right after I make them. This bread does not rise as much as regular bread during baking, but it does rise well. I use golden flax seeds. This recipe is meant to be made on a medium loaf pan of 8½ x 4½ inches. If you have a larger pan, you can double the recipe so that when baked the bread will rise to the top of your pan and will not be so thin. 

I am new to the Paleo diet and cooking with Almond Flour. I decided to try your Paleo Bread recipe first and it did not turn out the way yours looks in the picture…..instead it was more grainy and extremely dense, did not resemble bread in any way shape or form :-( I did not have coconut flour so that is the only ingredient I left out but I am hoping you can help me find the error in my ways. Please help!

Thank you for the terrific recipe. I must admit that this really turned out to be “oopsie bread” for me. Due to the expensive nature of the recipe (organic eggs, almond flour, grass fed butter) I really attempted to follow the recipe perfectly instead of going with my usual improvisational style. I also do not have a food processor however that did not impede anything… a hand mixer and a deft hand did the trick. I did add the optional xanthum gum and erythritol but not the cream of tartar. The batter filled my silicone loaf pan to the top, I smoothed it out and popped it into the oven. Then, to my horror, I saw the little pot of melted butter still on the stovetop. There was nothing to be done except cross my fingers and hope for the best.
Thank you soooo much for posting this recipe. I have been eating grain free and paleo since mid December and have been craving a nice sandwich. I have tried several bread recipes, but have found them to be dry, this bun recipe is AWESOME. It is moist, tasty and doesn’t fall apart — delish and sure has added a lot of new choices to my menu. It is awesome toasted which adds even more — BLTs here I come. So easy to make. I use a 4″ silicone mold to make mine and they are absolutely perfect.
Thank you so much for this! I have always LOVED bread and made my own before going Paleo earlier this year. Now my husband asked me to bake him Zucchini Blueberry Bread, my absolute favorite, more of a cake than bread. I knew it would be irresistible for me. The day I made his bread, I found your post (again). You said we could add fruit, so I added shredded zucchini and blueberries. AWSOME! Although it appeared to be done after 90 secs., there was a raw section inside. I put it all on a plate and microwaved a bit longer. What a great make over for an old-time favorite. Thanks again.
Hi Becky! If you use the recommended size baking pan, the bread will be the proper height and you will be able to use it for sandwiches. If you use a pan that is bigger than the one I used, your bread won’t fill the pan up. Here’s an example –if you place 1/2 cup of water in a 1/2 measuring cup it will be 100% full to the top of the cup. If you put the same 1/2 cup of water in a 1 cup measuring cup it will only fill it 50% and will only be 1/2 full in height. That’s why a loaf pan that is too large doesn’t work for this recipe when it comes to the height of the loaf :-)
Mine came out perfect following the directions exactly (and for the first time, one of my recipes looks exactly like the picture!). I was having problems baking gluten free foods in my new house, I had to extend cooking times and then they were unevenly cooked often. I finally had the temperature checked on my oven and it turns out my temp was running quite a bit lower, the repairman said it was a common issue. Once adjusted my GF recipes are coming out perfect. (It seems gluten free baked goods are a little more tempermental.) Just a thought, the trouble may be your oven.

photo sources: cavemen elephant hunt, caveman cooking over fire, cavemen hunt paleo bear, milk truck logo, darth vader vendor, storm trooper tomato, lego cook, chef and lego pig, lego explorer, lego muffin, lego bread and carbs, frozen caveman grok lego, lego clock, lego caveman forging for food, caveman with wheel, darth vader and ostrich lego, easing into water lego, lego man with pasta


Hi. I purchased the fox run pan just to be able to make this bread. Although I like the taste, both times I’ve made this the bread has a large uncooked section in the middle. The second time I made sure to cook for the longer time and inserted a knife to check, which came out clean. Although the uncooked section is smaller, it is still there. I followed the recipe and do not know what went wrong. Any suggestions?
This has been happening to me too! I make it exactly how the recipe is written. I tried baking it longer and its still hollow in the middle and mushy. It used to come out perfect for me but the last 4 times it has been this way. I just recently moved and made the first loaf in the new oven and same thing!! So frustrating. Maybe cover it with foil and cook it even longer than 35 min? What rack should it be on? Please help!! I can’t live without my paleo bread!!
The NY Times had a blog article on Good News on Saturated Fat which is reporting on Gary Taubes's interpretation of the new report in The New England Journal of Medicine on a two-year diet experiment in Israel. A followup is the post The Fat Fight Goes On where Gary rebuts the arguments against the study. And here's a good interview with Taubes (and includes a good summary): Gary Taubes on Cold Fusion, Good Nutrition and What Makes Bad (and Good) Science.
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