I made this yesterday. I made 1.5 times the recipe for a larger loaf pan and used apple butter (no sugar, just reduced apple) instead of yogurt or coconut butter. I had the same issue with the center being uncooked. Lesson learned that it needs to stay in longer but the pieces we cut off from around the center were very good. I was very impressed with this recipe. Thank you!
Thanks for the reply Adriana. What I meant by a quick mix in the Vitamix was that I “Vitamixed” it one more time to be positive it was as fine as could be. I keep almonds frozen and I use them up over time to make milk, then dehydrate the pulp and then turn it into flour. I will have to think about buying the flour already made again…seems like I’d be going backwards in my slow but steady journey of making the most of my whole ingredients. I wonder if blanched flour would work better…I’ve read that the the only difference with the skins is the little brown specks that don’t bother me. I may try again at some point.
Hi Valerie, so funny, I just got asked this question! 🙂 Here’s what I said, “…almond flour is a lot less absorbent than coconut flour (like A LOT). I know a few people have tried using oat flour with success, but I worry that almond flour would not be sufficient for absorbing the almond butter and creating a nice, firm texture. I’d recommend starting with about 3/4 cup almond flour, and experimenting as needed.” Hope this helps!

The Lazy Paleo Enthusiast's Cookbook: A Collection of Practical Recipes and Advice on How to Eat Healthy, Tasty Food While Spending as Little Time in the Kitchen as Possible by Sean Robertson. The author is a recovering vegan and in the first half of the book recounts his dietary experiences using some paleo foods to restore his health. You learn that the author's main strategy is to make food in large batches which can be reheated to provide dinners for several days running. The second half of the book contains 28 recipes. Some borderline or nonpaleo ingredients do appear, but most of the recipes are more paleo than not. Published November 15, 2011.
Elana, this bread is AMAZING. Seriously. We made some today, using ground chia seeds in place of the flaxseed meal, and xylitol in place of the honey (honey spikes my blood sugar too high, unfortunately), and it came out SO delicious. We used a little to do a trial run of Thanksgiving stuffing, and it came out JUST like our old corn bread stuffing recipe. I get to have stuffing this year!! Thank you so much for putting in all the work to get the recipe just right. It is much appreciated :)
I didn’t have almond flour so substituted 1 cup millet flour and 1 cup sorghum flour for the almond flour, and baked in an 7.5″ x 4.5″ x 2.5″ loaf pan. The loaf was short, about 1.5″ tall, the texture was pleasantly dense and held together well. The taste, however, was pasty (like flour) and the bread was dry. (I noticed afterwards that the sorghum flour package said to substitute 15-20% sorghum flour in your recipe, so that may have affected the taste and dryness.) I tried a slice with a topping of honey, and that was pretty good, but not good enough. So I made croutons, which were delicious. I cut the bread into small cubes and spread them on a cookie sheet, sprayed them with olive oil spray and drizzled 1/2 stick of butter over them, then seasoned generously with Nature’s Seasonings and garlic powder (for a richer crouton, could also sprinkle with parmesan cheese). I tossed them to distribute the seasonings and baked them at 350 degrees about 20 minutes until crunchy. I’ll try the recipe again when I have almond flour.
Cheryl, We use beef gelatin in this recipe to act as a binder and add a bit more chewiness to help simulate regular bread. (If you’re interested, we talk more about using beef gelatin in keto baking in this post: https://theketoqueens.com/crispy-low-carb-indian-flatbread-recipe/.) We haven’t experimented with this recipe to omit the beef gelatin, but you might be able to get a similar result using a bit more psyllium husk powder, flaxseed meal, ground chia seeds, xanthan gum, or guar gum. If you decide to play around with the recipe, please let us know how it goes!
Thank you so much for this recipe!! I am Norwegian and eating bread for multiple meals is part of our culture. I have not had too many problems with switching to a paleo diet but I have sorely missed eating bread. I have tried many gluten free and paleo bread recipes out there but this is by far the best one. I used 4 wide mouth canning jar lids and otherwise followed your recipe exactly and they came out nice and fluffy and even held up with “wet” sandwich ingredients . I am going to try some of the variations in the comments. Thank you for bringing back a vital part of my culture!
Oils are trickier. Loren Cordain, Ph.D., founder of The Paleo Diet Movement, breaks down which oils are healthy on the paleo diet: olive, walnut, flaxseed, macadamia, avocado and coconut oils are all allowed because they were gathered directly from the plant. While our hunter-gatherer ancestors probably did not consume flaxseed oil, it is allowed because of its content of high alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), a type of heart-healthy, anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty acid.
Hi Tanya, thanks for your comment and sorry to hear you are having trouble finding the loaf pan. If you bake this bread in a 9×5 inch loaf pan it will be very flat, as this recipe only makes enough batter to fill the pan halfway. I haven’t tested this in other pans, so I’m not sure what would work. If you experiment with mini loaf pans please let us know how it goes, that might work and I’m curious to hear about it!
I have tried so many paleo breads I can’t even count and I don’t normally post comments but I just made this bread and it is hands down the best paleo bread I have ever had and dare I say one of the best breads in general! Thank you Faith for sharing this incredible recipe! My husband and MY kids even love this bread! I followed your recipe perfectly as I had all the ingredients. I did however use the brown flax meal but I actually prefer it to look brown anyway. I also added some BRAG organic 24 herb and spice blend seasoning before baking and it tasted amazing! I took pictures even! Thanks again for sharing this recipe!
No background science here or lengthy explanations, only 15 easy guidelines to follow to kick-start your Paleo journey. It’s up to you to decide to what extent you want to follow those guidelines, but if you follow them 100% you can be assured that you are eating the best food for your body and greatly investing in your long term health and well-being.
NOTICE: The information contained or presented on this website is for educational purposes only. Information on this site is NOT intended to serve as a substitute for diagnosis, treatment, or advice from a qualified, licensed medical professional. The facts presented are offered as information only - not medical advice - and in no way should anyone infer that we or anyone appearing in any content on this website are practicing medicine. Any diet, health, or nutritional program you undertake should be discussed with your doctor or other licensed medical professional. Seek the advice of a medical professional for proper application of ANY material on this site to your specific situation.

Thank you so much for this recipe. I haven t had bread since starting Paleo about 3 1/2 months ago. Then my husband asked me to make him Zucchini Blueberry Bread, which I find irresistible. I made his bread last night then found this recipe. I made it today. I added some shredded zucchini and a handful of blueberries to it. It appeared done after 90 seconds but had a raw section inside. So I simply microwaved it a little more. It was absolutely delicious. Thanks again.
I just stumbled upon your website today..perfect timing! I have been struggling with my first month of switching to the Paleo lifestyle. I love to cook, love to eat, and hate being restricted. Even though I very rarely crave pasta, grains, or dairy I was going a bit nutty because I’m now “not allowed” to have them. Your website has been a blessing. Already today I have made the silver dollar pancakes for breakfast, the Paleo bread for the rest of the week and have so many other recipes I can’t wait to try!
I’ve tried a few other paleo/grain free breads and this is by far the best. It tastes great but what’s amazing about this recipe is ITS SO EASY. Being able to throw all the ingredients in a mixer and not having to fuss with whipping and folding in egg whites, etc is a perk. I made two modifications and it turned out well. Slightly melted raw honey in place of maple syrup and I doubled the recipe because I like the loaf to be close to a standard size (obviously adds a quite longer bake time but worth it).
Ostensibly, Grok is "a rather typical hunter–gatherer" living before the dawn of agriculture—an "official primal prototype." He is the poster-persona for fitness author and blogger Mark Sisson's "Primal Blueprint"—a set of guidelines that "allows you to control how your genes express themselves in order to build the strongest, leanest, healthiest body possible, taking clues from evolutionary biology (that's the primal part)." These guidelines incorporate many principles of what is more commonly known as the Paleolithic, or caveman, diet, which started to whet people's appetites as early as the 1960s and is available in many different flavors today.
The NY Times had a blog article on Good News on Saturated Fat which is reporting on Gary Taubes's interpretation of the new report in The New England Journal of Medicine on a two-year diet experiment in Israel. A followup is the post The Fat Fight Goes On where Gary rebuts the arguments against the study. And here's a good interview with Taubes (and includes a good summary): Gary Taubes on Cold Fusion, Good Nutrition and What Makes Bad (and Good) Science.
I have a question for you about eggs. Do you have any particular size or volume of “egg” that you tend to use in your recipes? In most of my cookbooks, an “egg” means a medium sized egg that yields about 50mls by volume, so there are slightly more than 5 eggs in a cup. I tend to buy extra large eggs locally, and I find that when a recipe calls for more than 3 eggs, the end result is quite “egg-y.” I’m going to experiment, but perhaps you would be able to tell me if there is a size or volume of egg that you tend to use in your recipes. (I didn’t see anything specific under the “ingredient” menu on your blog.)
Paleo diets are based on a simple premise – if the cavemen didn’t eat it, you shouldn’t either. So long to refined sugar, dairy, legumes and grains (this is pre-agricultural revolution), and hello to meat, fish, poultry, fruits and veggies. The idea is that by eliminating modern-era foods like highly-processed carbs and dairy, you can avoid or control “diseases of civilization” like Type 2 diabetes and heart disease, and likely lose weight too. What you eat and how much depend on your goals or the specific program you’re on, if you choose to follow one. The high-protein diet is ranked poorly among U.S. News experts, who consider it too restrictive to be healthy or sustainable.
Gluten is a protein found in things like rye, wheat, and barley. It’s now being said that much of our population may be gluten-intolerant (hence all the new “gluten-free!” items popping up everywhere).  Over time, those who are gluten intolerant can develop a dismal array of medical conditions from consuming gluten: dermatitis, joint pain, reproductive problems, acid reflux, and more.[2]
Finally found the recommended loaf size and could hardly wait to make this paleo bread. After 45 minutes and the toothpick coming out clean, removed it from the oven. After it cooled, cut it to serve and had two inches on either end and about a half an inch on the top and bottom that were edible. The middle consisted of what I would call an empty tunnel about the size of a silver dollar and surrounded by uncooked batter. Yuck. What’s so interesting is I made your Scrumptious Sandwich bread out of your book, and it turned out perfectly. I’ve been baking a LONG time, and I can’t even speculate as to what happened to this loaf. Did I have a massive air bubble in the middle, and, if so, why? Did using the food processor affect it? Any light you can shed on this will be greatly appreciated. I’ve been experimenting with the recipes in this cookbook and loving it. Please help me understand what happened to this paleo bread.
Obesity, heart disease, and diabetes: These are just a few of the health conditions that proponents of thePaleolithic diet, or caveman diet, blame on our sedentary lifestyles and modern diets, which are loaded with sugar, fat, and processed foods. Their proposed solution? Cut modern foods from our diet and return to the way our early hunter-gatherer ancestors ate.
You’ll lose weight because any time you restrict entire food groups, your calorie intake tends to be lower, Sandon says. And whenever you burn more calories than you consume, you'll have weight loss, she says. (2) The focus on lean protein, fruits, and vegetables over calorie- and sodium-rich processed foods can also contribute to weight loss, though she also points out that the paleo diet wasn’t created to be a weight loss diet. (3)

Hi Mindy – same here. But I did read in a comment about 1 or 2 years ago the same thing. From what I remember from those comments, others said the type of food we make from Elana’s baked recipes are just not designed to sit for more than 2 – 3 days. Other commenters chimed in and said their family eats up everything they bake, so nothing sits long enough to get the 3-day-old smell.

The Paleo diet is promoted as a way of improving health.[2] There is some evidence that following this diet may lead to improvements in terms of body composition and metabolic effects compared with the typical Western diet[6] or compared with diets recommended by national nutritional guidelines.[9] There is no good evidence, however, that the diet helps with weight loss, other than through the normal mechanisms of calorie restriction.[10] Following the Paleo diet can lead to an inadequate calcium intake, and side effects can include weakness, diarrhea, and headaches.[3][10]


We cannot time travel and join our Paleo ancestors by the campfire as they prepare to eat; likewise, shards of ancient pottery and fossilized teeth can tell us only so much. If we compare the diets of so-called modern hunter-gatherers, however, we see just how difficult it is to find meaningful commonalities and extract useful dietary guidelines from their disparate lives (see infographic). Which hunter–gatherer tribe are we supposed to mimic, exactly? How do we reconcile the Inuit diet—mostly the flesh of sea mammals—with the more varied plant and land animal diet of the Hadza or !Kung? Chucking the many different hunter–gather diets into a blender to come up with some kind of quintessential smoothie is a little ridiculous. "Too often modern health problems are portrayed as the result of eating 'bad' foods that are departures from the natural human diet…This is a fundamentally flawed approach to assessing human nutritional needs," Leonard wrote. "Our species was not designed to subsist on a single, optimal diet. What is remarkable about human beings is the extraordinary variety of what we eat. We have been able to thrive in almost every ecosystem on the Earth, consuming diets ranging from almost all animal foods among populations of the Arctic to primarily tubers and cereal grains among populations in the high Andes.”

Hi Solange, if you use the recommended size baking pan, the bread will be the proper height. If you use a pan that is bigger than the one I used, your bread will rise, but it won’t fill the pan to the right height. Here’s an example that might help –if you place 1/2 cup of water in a 1/2 measuring cup it will be 100% full to the top of the cup. If you put the same 1/2 cup of water in a 1 cup measuring cup it will only fill it 50% and will only be 1/2 full in height. That’s why a loaf pan that is too large doesn’t work for this recipe when it comes to the height of the loaf :-)
My 16 month old son loves the bread. He prefers it over the bakery italian bread(full of gluten and yeast) that we normally get him. Plus our dog is allergic to grains, so now I don’t have to worry about our son sharing his bread with her. As for me, I’m allergic to yeast and I’ve wanted to reduce gluten in my diet. Finding gluten and yeast free bread is nearly impossible.
×