Michele, this is the most delicious bread and can’t believe it’s paleo. So easy to make and keep. After a few days of keeping it out, I cut the rest into slices, put slice sized parchment paper between each one and freeze. I save the parchment for future loaves. Getting ready to make another one. It’s so delicious! Thank you for all your attempts to perfect it. YUM!!
Delicious! I had to use white rice flour as I didn’t have coconut and it wasn’t available at the store across the street. It smelled a bit odd, but tastes great! Anyone have any ideas as to why all my breads come out the height of biscotti (ok, maybe a little taller, but not much)? I use a Pyrex glass loaf pan. I try to avoid using Aluminum cookware and I’m tempted to try the cast iron pan that several people raved about, but I am definitely looking for a sandwich bread shape. I would love some feedback on that.

Alyssa, one more thing. Both the bowl and the beaters need to be spotlessly clean. If there is one hint of oil anywhere the whites will not beat properly. Nicole is correct about not using a plastic bowl. Plastic will even absorb oil to say nothing of the microscopic amounts that get into the surface when it’s scratched. When baking it is always best to use a metal or glass bowl for all of your mixing.
Eat WELL Feel GOOD: Practical Paleo Living by Diane Frampton has over 200 recipes that makes paleo eating simple, delicious, and ultimately, intuitive. So they claim. There are only a few reviews at Amazon. They all like the book, but their lack of details makes it appear that they are not truly independent reviews. The recipes have a Crossfit appeal to them. Chef Rachel Albert has made some of the recipes and posted here [archive.org].
Hi Paola, just tried your bread recipe yesterday. I proofed my dough in a Brod & Taylor proofing box at 88F for one hour. My dough rose, but not by much, not by 100%. I used Bob’s Redmill Fine Almond flour but might change to Anthony’s or King Arthur Flour super fine almond flour because my bread came out similar to a brick. Should I let my dough rise for more than one hour? Thank you Paola….love your site and recipes and think you are a genius!!
When you are separating the eggs if you use the method of pouring the egg from one half of the shell to the other you have to be extremely careful because the sharp shell can easily break the yolk. There are tools that you can purchase that will cradle the yolk and let the white run into a separate bowl. Or, you can use your hands. You need to make sure that your hands are extremely clean and fresh from being washed. Break the egg into one hand and let the white slip between your slightly separate fingers. The yolk will settle into your hand and the white will slip off into the bowl.
OMG-made this recipe for fun(I have no dietary restricions about gluten or grains or any allergies) Followed recipe exactly and used three 4″mini springform pans. These buns came out awesome! Texture and taste like real actual bread! Eating one wih chicken salad as I type! I’ve tried other bread recipes before using almond or coconut flours and never came out worthy of the effort and cost involved but these are amazing! I love that it is a small batch using simple minimal ingredients so u dont end up with a ton of something u can’t eat fast enough before it goes bad(not that these would even last that long if I quadrupled the recipe…!)

I made this tonight and used 1.5 cups almond flour, 1/2 cup tapioca starch, subbed chia meal for flax meal, subbed avocado oil for coconut oil, and added 1.5 T caraway seeds to give it a bit of a “rye bread taste”. We had it with corned beef tonight and it was very good. I did two mini loafs which took the same amount of cooking time. My husband and older son are usually very picky about paleo breads and they both gave it a thumbs up… I think because they both like the taste of caraway. Thanks for the recipe!
I recently found out I’m allergic to many of the foods that I’ve consumed over the years and was recently told to eat strictly Paleo……..and for someone who needs a map and directions in her own kitchen, for someone who has singlehandedly kept the restaurant business in the black, that’s a pretty big expectation. This bread has saved me and my fiance in so many of those, “I can’t do this any longer” moments when we really miss the old way of eating. We cant recommend this bread enough! Thank you!
Traditional lemon bars are so good, but that sugar high comes with a subsequent crash. That’s not the case with this Paleo-friendly version. Using honey instead of refined sugar keeps things sweet without throwing your blood sugar out of whack, while using coconut flour in the crust makes it perfectly crunchy. Make an extra batch because these will go quickly.
A strict paleo diet does not allow dairy products because hunter-gatherers did not milk cows. Some paleo dieters say dairy is OK, especially if it is grass-fed because grass-fed butter, for example, has more omega-3s. Fermented dairy products are also OK for some paleo eaters because they have a lower content of lactose and casein, the two concerns paleo dieters have with dairy.

Thank you so much for this recipe!! I am Norwegian and eating bread for multiple meals is part of our culture. I have not had too many problems with switching to a paleo diet but I have sorely missed eating bread. I have tried many gluten free and paleo bread recipes out there but this is by far the best one. I used 4 wide mouth canning jar lids and otherwise followed your recipe exactly and they came out nice and fluffy and even held up with “wet” sandwich ingredients . I am going to try some of the variations in the comments. Thank you for bringing back a vital part of my culture!
Nourishing Traditions: The Cookbook that Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and the Diet Dictocrat by Mary G. Enig, Ph.D. and Sally Fallon. The premise is the culinary traditions of our ancestors, and the food choices and preparation techniques of healthy nonindustrialized peoples, should serve as the model for contemporary eating habits. However, they push whole grains and dairy, which aren't Paleolithic.

I have successfully made the Paleo bread twice & it worked out perfectly! However, when I made it recently, the edges of the bread were a gray color upon taking it out of the pan. When I sliced the bread & spread with raspberry jam (to resemble a tea cake), the jam turned blue-gray. I think it was some sort of acidic reaction. I did leave the bread in the pan for about 40 minutes after baking before releasing. Now I just remembered that I used rice vinegar (because I was out of cider). Maybe that caused the reaction? I used anodized aluminum pan by the brand “Fat Daddy.”
Ok, I did mine a little different. I can’t eat the almond flour so I substituted non glutton Oat flour and I also added chia seeds. I wasn’t able to get the right sized pan, mine is the larger one, so I noticed that the bread wasn’t going to be very high, so …. I made another batch of bread, added it to the lower layer and cooked. Oh wow!! So good!! But I can’t eat it all at once. Poo! Anyway, don’t be afraid to use the bigger pan, just double the recipe.
The most updated recipe worked perfectly! I used every ingredient and the amount called for with the Magic Line loaf pan. The one and only thing I did differently was I needed to add 10 extra minutes of baking checking the bread with a toothpick every 5 minutes after initially checking at 30 min. I live in western Mass and the weather was humid and hot when I made this, maybe that has something to do it.
The paleo diet runs on the same foods our hunter-gather ancestors supposedly ate: fruits, vegetables, meats, seafood, and nuts. "By following these nutritional guidelines, we put our diet more in line with the evolutionary pressures that shaped our current genetics, which in turn positively influences health and well being," says Loren Cordain, PhD, professor of health and exercise science at Colorado State University and author of The Paleo Diet. He says the diet lessens the body's glycemic load, has a healthy ratio of saturated-to-unsaturated fatty acids, increases vitamin and nutrient consumption, and contains an optimal balance of protein, fat, and carbohydrates.
I’ve gone around the web finding the best fast easy, and absolutely delicious easy paleo desserts. Because eating paleo is hard enough without having to spend two hours making a complicated dessert only to have it come out badly because paleo baking is so darn finicky. All of the recipes in this roundup are tried, tested, and true, take 45 minutes or less to prepare, and should satisfy all your cravings for easy paleo desserts. So let’s get started!
A decade ago, when I was on the low-fat craze, I’d make fluffy cakes using no butter/fat, replacing it with apple sauce, which gives moisture and a soft texture. These days, I’m a low-carb girl, but a 1/4 cup of apple sauce divided by 4 = only 1 tablespoon (per roll/per 2nd day). I’m okay with that, especially because I substitute half the tapioca flour (high-carb) for whey protein powder to cut a few carbs that way. 🙂
I want to marry you because of this recipe (okay, maybe a tad dramatic). I only had tapioca starch so made it according to your instructions and subbed the flaxseed meal for chia because that was all I had but this bread turned out perfectly. I’m not exactly paleo and I’m generally a good cook, bad baker but this worked even for the inept baker like me. Thank you so much! Next time, I think I’ll try topping it with sunflower seeds just for an extra bite!
It is interesting in gluten free baking how seemingly minute changes can have a big effect on the taste, texture, consistency and rise of the finished product. I thought it was just me that had such an enhanced palate (since I have Fibromyalgia, CFS, etc) my senses and nerves are forever enhanced. In my vanilla oat banana quick bread recipe I have found that variations in the type of pan etc will change the entire finished product. I have tried it in a large loaf pan, mini loaves and muffins. This recipe which I created works best as mini loaves. Just last week I made it and I used my nutri bullet instead of my food processor to ground the oat, corn meal and corn starch flour blend I created and it made for a very fine powder. This change in the texture of of the flour gave the bread a different texture. It was a slight change that only I would have noticed but I was going crazy trying to pinpoint what made the difference. I pinpointed that in order to get the rise and texture I prefer, I need to use mini loaf pans and pulse my blend in the food processor. I feel like these variations are part of all baking but pronounced in gf baking for sure.

Almost equal numbers of advocates and critics seem to have gathered at the Paleo diet dinner table and both tribes have a few particularly vociferous members. Critiques of the Paleo diet range from the mild—Eh, it's certainly not the worst way to eat—to the acerbic: It is nonsensical and sometimes dangerously restrictive. Most recently, in her book Paleofantasy, evolutionary biologist Marlene Zuk of the University of California, Riverside, debunks what she identifies as myths central to the Paleo diet and the larger Paleo lifestyle movement.


I made this bread recipe today using the ingredients shown in the recipe. Since I don’t own small sized bread pans I cooked this in my enamelled cast iron LeCreuset Pate Terrine with a parchment paper liner. It made a long low loaf, perfect for smaller sandwiches or for hors d’oeuvres with a gorgeous crust. I was a little worried about the coconut oil taste being dominant in the bread but thankfully, it wasn’t. I sprinkled raw sunflower seeds all the way down the top of the loaf. I poured some apple cider vinegar into my tablespoon but finished off the amount with boiled cider to add to the apple flavor.

Nice and firm. Baked it on the recommended temp, added 6 or 7 minutes. Pressed the middle and it was great. I let it cool. What was nice about it was obviously it’s low carb bread…hurray for that, but it cut well. Got 18 slices easily about 1/2 inch thick without breakage. Most importantly, it wasn’t greasy, or almond tasting overload, just delicious.
I feel like I need to personally thank you for this recipe. I’ve had celiac disease for 7 years and have never been able to find (or make) a bread substitute that reminds me of the oh so glutenfull bread I used to enjoy, namely sandwich bread. I literally make these 1 if not 2 times a week! They make incredible sandwiches, open face “pizza crusts” and so much more. This bread is the real deal and I can’t thank you enough!!!
Finally found the recommended loaf size and could hardly wait to make this paleo bread. After 45 minutes and the toothpick coming out clean, removed it from the oven. After it cooled, cut it to serve and had two inches on either end and about a half an inch on the top and bottom that were edible. The middle consisted of what I would call an empty tunnel about the size of a silver dollar and surrounded by uncooked batter. Yuck. What’s so interesting is I made your Scrumptious Sandwich bread out of your book, and it turned out perfectly. I’ve been baking a LONG time, and I can’t even speculate as to what happened to this loaf. Did I have a massive air bubble in the middle, and, if so, why? Did using the food processor affect it? Any light you can shed on this will be greatly appreciated. I’ve been experimenting with the recipes in this cookbook and loving it. Please help me understand what happened to this paleo bread.

Buried in the middle of The Revised Metabolic Oncolytic Regimen for Effecting Lysis in Solid Tumors one can find their diet recommendations for tumor control. It has a paleo diet orientation. Protein is 35%, preferably Omega 3 rich. Carbohydrates (also 35%) are only vegetables and fruit, no beans, bread, potatoes, or any grain. Then dietary and supplemental forms of fat should provide 20-30% of (daily) calories.
Hi John, You could possible try a hand mixer in a bowl instead of the food processor, but I haven’t tried it, so can’t vouch for the results. Most likely the bread would not be as tall because the mixer would completely deflate the first half of the egg whites when you add them to the batter. The second half should be folded so that part will be find. If you try with a bowl and hand mixer, let me know how that goes.

I just made this tonight…I must say I was NOT holding out much hope, but O-M-G…it turned out delicious!! I didn’t have flax seeds (I used Chia seeds instead) and I didn’t have flaxseed meal…but had Flaxseed milled….and hey…it worked!! Thank you so much for the recipe. My only issue was that the top didn’t brown, it stayed kind of white-ish, I didn’t want to leave it in any longer cause I was afraid of over-cooking…any tips for getting the top to brown?
Hi Brenda, There are various reasons but the most common one is that coconut flour is extremely absorbent and needs a lot of eggs to offset how much moisture it absorbs. If you used a liquid like milk or water, it would fall apart. That being said, this recipe is not dry or dense. Did you try making it? Whipping the egg whites creates the exact opposite effect and the bread turns out light and fluffy. Hope you’ll give it a try!
A friend made this bread with pecans or walnuts because she had no almonds. She sent me home a slice after church this last week. I did not think I missed bread…OH MY Goodness. It is SO light. I loved every bite.I am very strict paleo because of allergies and blood sugar issuses keeps me low carb Paleo. Thank you so much for the HARD work of your experimentation. Love you. Lynn

Alina Bradford is a contributing writer for Live Science. Over the past 16 years, Alina has covered everything from Ebola to androids while writing health, science and tech articles for major publications. She has multiple health, safety and lifesaving certifications from Oklahoma State University. Alina's goal in life is to try as many experiences as possible. To date, she has been a volunteer firefighter, a dispatcher, substitute teacher, artist, janitor, children's book author, pizza maker, event coordinator and much more.
I made this bread and really do like it~ we are paleo and needed a good bread recipe. What I am wondering is how the picture you have of this bread is so light and yellow colored? After making it, the bread is dark and even has a green tint to it over time. The texture and taste are both perfect, but it doesn’t look appetizing~ trying to figure out how mine looks so different than the picture of your bread. I noticed that the pictures other people posted also showed dark bread as well. I used all of the recommended ingredients exactly- but it does not come out light or yellowy. Any recommendations?

I forgot to say I used half al one flour and half sunflower seed flour.. I double the batch and I found if I let it sit for about 25 min, then put it in the oven it gets thicker as it sits and I still have to bake it for an hour. The tast is great. The next time I’m buying Honeyville flour and making it exactly like your recipe says. I’m just worried about mixing it to much. Mine is very dense and heavy. But yummy.
i loved this recipe! my bread did not rise like yours did although i used the recommended pan size. maybe because i used bob’s red mill meal/flour and my eggs were straight out of the fridge. those were the only two factors i could think of. anyways, the bread was delicious and i have longed for bread while following paleo plans. thanks, and i will continue to search for the flour that you recommend and allow my eggs to warm up a bit prior to my next loaf. i will let you know how that worked out.
I made this tonight and used 1.5 cups almond flour, 1/2 cup tapioca starch, subbed chia meal for flax meal, subbed avocado oil for coconut oil, and added 1.5 T caraway seeds to give it a bit of a “rye bread taste”. We had it with corned beef tonight and it was very good. I did two mini loafs which took the same amount of cooking time. My husband and older son are usually very picky about paleo breads and they both gave it a thumbs up… I think because they both like the taste of caraway. Thanks for the recipe!
One larger randomized controlled trial followed 70 post-menopausal Swedish women with obesity for two years, who were placed on either a Paleo diet or a Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (NNR) diet. [7] The Paleo diet provided 30% of total calories from protein, 40% fat (from mostly monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats) and 30% carbohydrates. It included lean meats, fish, eggs, vegetables, fruits, berries, nuts, avocado, and olive oil. The NNR diet provided less protein and fat but more carbohydrate with 15% protein, 25-30% fat, and 55-60% carbohydrates, including foods similar to the Paleo diet but also low-fat dairy products and high-fiber grains. Both groups significantly decreased fat mass and weight circumference at 6 and 24 months, with the Paleo diet producing greater fat loss at 6 months but not at 24 months. Triglyceride levels decreased more significantly with the Paleo diet at 6 and 24 months than the NNR diet.
Hi, I just made these this morning. I substituted gelatin eggs for real eggs. I baked them on a cookie sheet—but next time I will put them on parchment paper because they did stick some. I also forgot the baking powder. I baked them for 20 mins. They were crunchy on the outside and gooey in the middle, but still delicious!! I also put them in the toaster after they came out of the oven. I would really love to come up with AIP recipe for these, because they are so darn good!! I probably could have gotten away with just one gelatin egg as well. I will have to experiment—-but if you come up with anything AIP in the future, please let us know! I love your blog!!
These paleo 7 layer bars make the PERFECT gift for your friends and family since they look amazing and can easily be packaged.  It now makes so much sense why I used to see these magical 7 layer bars everywhere during the holidays.  Plus, they’re easy to make and, now that we can make them vegan, paleo, and even clean eating, you can share with almost anyone!
According to the model from the evolutionary discordance hypothesis, "[M]any chronic diseases and degenerative conditions evident in modern Western populations have arisen because of a mismatch between Stone Age genes and modern lifestyles."[26] Advocates of the modern Paleo diet have formed their dietary recommendations based on this hypothesis. They argue that modern humans should follow a diet that is nutritionally closer to that of their Paleolithic ancestors.
Mine came out perfect following the directions exactly (and for the first time, one of my recipes looks exactly like the picture!). I was having problems baking gluten free foods in my new house, I had to extend cooking times and then they were unevenly cooked often. I finally had the temperature checked on my oven and it turns out my temp was running quite a bit lower, the repairman said it was a common issue. Once adjusted my GF recipes are coming out perfect. (It seems gluten free baked goods are a little more tempermental.) Just a thought, the trouble may be your oven.
Hi Eva, That’s awesome that you are helping your son this way. I haven’t tried this with other tools, but you could probably use either the blender or the food processor. The key is to pulse in step 5, not just constantly blend, so that the whites don’t fully break down. Other than that, it should be pretty similar. As for the yolks, if you don’t want to make creme brulee, I usually just put a couple extras into an omelet (or breakfast casserole, or any other dish requiring cooked eggs) mixed with whole eggs.
I must admit that when I read all the comments for this recipe I was so nervous to try it even though I’ve been hand-kneeding and baking my own breads without a recipe (an ancient family tradition) for over 20 years. Since I don’t have any background in gluten-free baking but recently changed to a low-carb lifestyle, I didn’t know what to expect. I noticed that a lot of people seemed to have issues with the proofing and resting of the bread dough. In order to eliminate the possibility of this happening, and since I know I understand yeast proofing really well, and knew that I won’t have an issue with dead yeast, I made sure that my kitchen temperature would be really warm so I placed a space heater on my kitchen counter facing the yeast and then later the dough as it rested. In the end, the bread turned out near perfect. The smell and taste was fabulous. The only thing I can say is that my bread pan is a 9X5 so next time I will make 1.5 the recipe. Otherwise, all I can say is this recipe is a winner!!!!
Hi, I have just put this loaf into the oven, but mine never reached a pouring consistency. It was a thick dough which I was able to spread in the loaf pan only with the greatest difficulty. The only changes I made were omitting the arrowroot, as I didn’t have it – I followed your notes for that exactly, increasing the tapioca to 4 tablespoons and adding an extra egg white. I used de-fatted almond flour, which should not account for the dryness of the mixture – I actually had to leave out half a cup of the dry moisture, because it was already so doughy. Any idea what went wrong?
Even if eating only foods available to hunter–gatherers in the Paleolithic made sense, it would be impossible. As Christina Warinner of the University of Zurich emphasizes in her 2012 TED talk, just about every single species commonly consumed today—whether a fruit, vegetable or animal—is drastically different from its Paleolithic predecessor. In most cases, we have transformed the species we eat through artificial selection: we have bred cows, chickens and goats to provide as much meat, milk and eggs as possible and have sown seeds only from plants with the most desirable traits—with the biggest fruits, plumpest kernels, sweetest flesh and fewest natural toxins. Cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts and kale are all different cultivars of a single species, Brassica oleracea; generation by generation, we reshaped this one plant's leaves, stems and flowers into wildly different arrangements, the same way we bred Welsh corgis, pugs, dachshunds, Saint Bernards and greyhounds out of a single wolf species. Corn was once a straggly grass known as teosinte and tomatoes were once much smaller berries. And the wild ancestors of bananas were rife with seeds.
I made this but didn’t have baking powder, so I subbed a little baking soda and greek yogurt instead. I also added some italian herb blend. I froze it overnight to take to camp. Now it’s perfect for a lunch or snack. I’m topping a slice with a little goat chesee, fresh basil, couple pieces of spring mix and a few cherry tomatoes on the side! It’s delicious!
Fast forward 15 years later and I live in my own house with air conditioning and I make the rules. 🙂 But even though I still turn the oven on to bake in the summer (I just have to some days! Hello, it’s my job.) I still have the notion that summertime = no ovens. So I’m always looking for healthy treats to make that don’t require the oven or much effort.
Thank you so much for this recipe. I’ve made this recipe and your simple bread recipe and both came out perfect right from the start. I did follow the recipes EXACTLY, except for the fact that I don’t have a food processor so I had to “pulse” by hand which led me to believe that I had to stir in ingredients in large minimal swoops being careful not to over mix. Wondering if that is what other people had done when they’ve made this recipe without a food processor? As I said, it came out perfectly. just wondering if I was just lucky.
We Want to Live: The Primal Diet (2005 Expanded Edition) is a book by Aajonus Vonderplanitz. His basic philosophy is that (a) food is to be eaten in a live, raw condition; and (b) a diet rich in raw fats and raw meats from natural sources is essential to health. However his diet includes massive amounts of raw dairy. From the Planets is a book review by Ralph W. Moss. The Live-Food Mailing List discusses the concepts of this book.

This is the best!!!! It got rave reviews from everyone, even my most pickiest eater!! I cannot thank you enough for posting this. We just switched to a gluten-free, dairy-free, and grain-free lifestyle and this is exactly what I have been missing. I used these with my homemade BBQ turkey burgers last night.. Thank you again, this is now in my recipe book to stay!!
This bread does have quite a few ingredients, but you’ll find that most are staple paleo and keto pantry ingredients. In the list below you’ll find details on several ingredients and possible subs. But if possible, please do try and make this recipe without any subs. As out of the 18 permutations we tried, this one really was terrific and the absolute best.
As paleo guru Robb Wolf puts it, think of a 100-yard football field. The first 99.5 yards are how long Homo-Sapiens spent as hunter-gatherers. As they became REALLY good at hunting and gathering our bodies adapted to that lifestyle over thousands of years. That last half-yard represents our species after the agricultural revolution, where our diet has shifted (but our genetics haven’t).
I just found this recipe and I notice that the recipes are very similar: this one has the addition of a little coconut flour, half the salt and half the vinegar, but maintains the baking soda quantity. How does the the texture of this bread compare to your low carb corn bread? I’m very curious about what went into the decisions that differentiate the two breads.

Happy weekend, and round up Sunday! I’m writing you from Colorado where we just had our first-ever, in-person Healthy Glow Co. retreat. I got to spend the weekend with the HGC team and 14 amazing members that make our collective possible. Feeling inspired, refreshed, and SO excited about the community we’ve built. I’ll be sure to share more details of our trip soon, but first let’s talk about these incredible paleo dessert recipes that I rounded up for you guys!
Obesity, heart disease, and diabetes: These are just a few of the health conditions that proponents of thePaleolithic diet, or caveman diet, blame on our sedentary lifestyles and modern diets, which are loaded with sugar, fat, and processed foods. Their proposed solution? Cut modern foods from our diet and return to the way our early hunter-gatherer ancestors ate.
Just made this bread this morning and it was wonderful! It will be a life saver since my 2 year old and husband are obsessed with bread. My only problem was that it came out very flat (only about an 1.5-2 inches thick). The only difference I could think of was that the only yogurt I had was plain whole milk, not greek. I was thinking about doubling the batch and cooking time to see if I get a thicker loaf. Any thoughts? It makes a good snack bread, but not sandwich bread since the slices are so small (they’d be finger sandwiches). Thanks again!!
Another possibility is that maybe your oven is not well calibrater (which is normal) and your bread needed to cook longer. I suggest next time you insert the stick in a few areas to ensure it’s done throughout. Also, it’s a good idea to purchase an oven thermometer to ensure the temperature is where you want it during baking. They cost less that $20, I got mine for less than $10.
I just made this recipe and it was AMAZING! I used almond meal (because I just made almond milk a few days ago, so the “meal” was what I had left over). It came out so moist, light and fluffy….not dense at all! Do you think it would freeze well? What would happen if I only put 3 eggs in? Have you tried less eggs? Thanks for posting such a great recipe! 

This is the third time I have made this bread. The first time I followed you directions and discovered the middle wasn’t quite baked all the way through. So I read some of the comments and tried it again. The second time I kept the oven temp the same and cut down on the butter and baked it for about 40-45 minutes. It turned out fine then. However it doesn’t that size of a loaf doesn’t last long in our house. So today I made it again and increased the recipe by half. I had bought a 12″ x 4.5″ x 3 ” bread loaf pan. I used 7 tbsp of Kerry Gold butter instead of 9 tbsp. Otherwise the rest was the same. I baked it at 355 degrees for 1 hour. It turned out perfectly. I couldn’t wait to let it cool too much. I love warm bread and just had to have a couple of slices. Btw- the organic almond flour I used was from our local grocery store health market section.
Scott, Thanks so much for trying the bread, I’m sorry to hear the inside isn’t fully cooked for you. I wouldn’t cover the loaf while cooking, I would just leave the loaf in longer until fully cooked. Was the middle still uncooked, but the outside starting to burn? If that’s the case you might want to have your oven calibrated to make sure it’s accurate. Another thing you could try is reducing the temperature slightly (maybe by 25 degrees) and letting the loaf finish cooking at a lower temp so the outside doesn’t get too dark. I hope this helps!
Ana, We like using a combination of almond flour and coconut flour for this bread to achieve the best flavor and texture. We haven’t tried this bread using only coconut flour, but it may work. Coconut flour absorbs liquid differently, so you’ll want to use about 1/4 the amount of coconut flour as almond flour (since the recipe calls for 2 cups almond flour, that would be 1/2 cup coconut flour in addition to the 3/4 cup coconut flour that the recipe already calls for). However, the flavor and texture of this bread will likely be different with that substitution. Please let us know how it goes if you give it a try!

Hi Meredith, every photo I share with my recipes are from the same recipe. I usually photograph the food right after I make them. This bread does not rise as much as regular bread during baking, but it does rise well. I use golden flax seeds. This recipe is meant to be made on a medium loaf pan of 8½ x 4½ inches. If you have a larger pan, you can double the recipe so that when baked the bread will rise to the top of your pan and will not be so thin.
I didn’t have almond flour so substituted 1 cup millet flour and 1 cup sorghum flour for the almond flour, and baked in an 7.5″ x 4.5″ x 2.5″ loaf pan. The loaf was short, about 1.5″ tall, the texture was pleasantly dense and held together well. The taste, however, was pasty (like flour) and the bread was dry. (I noticed afterwards that the sorghum flour package said to substitute 15-20% sorghum flour in your recipe, so that may have affected the taste and dryness.) I tried a slice with a topping of honey, and that was pretty good, but not good enough. So I made croutons, which were delicious. I cut the bread into small cubes and spread them on a cookie sheet, sprayed them with olive oil spray and drizzled 1/2 stick of butter over them, then seasoned generously with Nature’s Seasonings and garlic powder (for a richer crouton, could also sprinkle with parmesan cheese). I tossed them to distribute the seasonings and baked them at 350 degrees about 20 minutes until crunchy. I’ll try the recipe again when I have almond flour.
Bought this probably about a year ago or so... Finally decide to try it. WOW!!! It's been 18 days and I've lost over 16 pounds, and I've been eating all I want, and am never going hungry, so I have no cravings for anything, fresh home-made Italian bread or even my all-time favorite corn-type snacks, especially popcorn. Tried some hi carb, processed foods after the first week... felt like crap and lost my desire to eat them. I assume I will plateau one of these days and will have to start exercising, but right now I have a sedentary lifestyle with my job and additional personal activities.

Eat WELL Feel GOOD: Practical Paleo Living by Diane Frampton has over 200 recipes that makes paleo eating simple, delicious, and ultimately, intuitive. So they claim. There are only a few reviews at Amazon. They all like the book, but their lack of details makes it appear that they are not truly independent reviews. The recipes have a Crossfit appeal to them. Chef Rachel Albert has made some of the recipes and posted here [archive.org].

The Paleo Answer: 7 Days to Lose Weight, Feel Great, Stay Young by Loren Cordain. The author shows you how to supercharge the Paleo diet for optimal lifelong health and weight loss. Featuring a new prescriptive 7-day plan and surprising revelations from the author's original research, it's the most powerful Paleo guide yet. Published December 20, 2011.
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