Hi Meredith, every photo I share with my recipes are from the same recipe. I usually photograph the food right after I make them. This bread does not rise as much as regular bread during baking, but it does rise well. I use golden flax seeds. This recipe is meant to be made on a medium loaf pan of 8½ x 4½ inches. If you have a larger pan, you can double the recipe so that when baked the bread will rise to the top of your pan and will not be so thin.
I’ve been thinking about bringing paleo-friendly bread and rolls to LCK for some time now. But I knew before I did that I needed to make sure they fit specific criteria. They need the right flavor and fluffy, soft, air-y, bread-like texture. You see, I’ve never bothered buying gluten-free breads in the store. I never thought it was worth it because I always felt they were dense, not the right flavor, etc.
has anyone else had this problem…a tunnel of raw dough in the middle of the bread? it happened today with the paleo but has happened with others and it only happens with the magic line pan. never cupcakes. followed recipe exactly and i live in boulder so not the altitude…the whole middle collapses and is gooey..wasting half of the loaf..thanks for help. ( the good part is yummy)
Transfer bread dough to prepared loaf pan, using a wet spatula to even out the top. Cover with a kitchen towel and place in a warm draft-free space for 50-60 minutes until the dough has risen just past the top of the loaf pan. How long it takes depends on your altitude, temperature and humidity- so keep an eye out for it every 15 minutes or so. And keep in mind that if you use a larger loaf pan it won't rise past the top. 

There has been so much nutrition and dietary mis-information in the past 100 years, it’s very confusing to sort it all out. I’m thankful I found Paleo! And as paleo shoppers, we know to avoid the center of the market and stick to the outside loop which is where we find the lean proteins, the nuts, seeds, greens, vegetables and fruits. It not only saves us time when we shop, it keeps us healthy.

I just used a 9 x 5 pan and did not change the recipe proportions at all. Since this is the only loaf pan I have, instead, I pushed the dough against one side of the pan and formed a small loaf that is closer to the 7.5 x 3.5 pan size that Elana says to use. The dough was sticky enough to hold together fine and did not collapse or spread out during baking. It’s not the most beautiful creation, but it’s proportioned OK and tastes fine. I say – make it work with what you have and you’ll be alright.
I’m a big fan of yours and have, over the five years since our family went gluten-free/Paleo, used many of your recipes with great success, especially those for the Jewish holidays. Our recent discovery was your chocolate hamentaschen recipe (https://elanaspantry.com/chocolate-raspberry-hamantaschen/) – which was very well received by our family, our synagogue (and not just the other GF individuals), and most of the kids in both girls’ school classes. And it really was so easy to make, which I especially appreciated, since we always make a lot to share!
Wonderful recipe; made it today and will make it again. Two changes I had to make: having no golden milled flax, I had brown flax seeds which I ground in my food processor, (didn’t get as fine as milled). Also had no arrowroot, so used tapioca flour. Delighted with the results. It rose beautifully, had to bake it a few more minutes; the top was a bit less smooth than yours, and the texture is probably a bit different due to fax seed not being as fine as milled. It is still a keeper as it holds together well after slicing. My husband (not paleo) made disparaging remarks when I told him I was making paleo bread, but he ate two thick slices with butter before I snatched it away. He says it won’t hold together for sandwich, but I will make him eat his words tomorrow. Thanks for the wonderful recipe! When this is gone, I am going to make the multi-seed and nut bread.
Liza, I haven’t tried this recipe using cashew flour, but if you’ve had success using a 1:1 substitution for almond flour making other bread-type recipes, I think it could work! I also haven’t tried this recipe using coconut milk, but other readers have and said it works well. Yes, please let us know how it goes if you try it with these substitutions!
Kim, thanks for your comment. I’ve baked this bread at both sea level and 8,000 feet and haven’t found any need for adjustments. The issue is likely the size pan that you baked the bread in. If you use the recommended size baking pan, the bread will be the proper height. If you use a pan that is bigger than the one I used, your bread will rise, but it won’t fill the pan to the right height. Here’s an example that might help –if you place 1/2 cup of water in a 1/2 measuring cup it will be 100% full to the top of the cup. If you put the same 1/2 cup of water in a 1 cup measuring cup it will only fill it 50% and will only be 1/2 full in height. That’s why a loaf pan that is too large doesn’t work for this recipe when it comes to the bread “rising” and the height of the loaf :-)

Made this for the first time and after reading all the reviews about dense and not rising, decided to separate egg whites and yolks and whisk first the whites and then the yolks to increase volume, as one would for a sponge cake. Must confess to adding a pinch of cream of tartar to the whites, ( this is one of the ingredients in baking powder so shouldn’t upset the purists). I also only had almond meal ( trader joes) unblanched, and substituted fresh lime juice for the vinegar and used 1tbsp olive oil, didn’t have coconut oil. Once all three bowls were mixed thoroughly (1.whites, 2.yolks plus honey, oil and lime juice, and 3. dry ingredients whizzed tog. In processor,) gently fold all together, yolk mix into whites, then dry mix into egg mix . Put into oiled loaf pan and bake as directed……….it turned out just perfect and delicious……..looks like the picture only much darker because of the almond meal…..more like a whole wheat loaf would look…I am so pleased, the added step is worth the trouble, it rose to the top of the pan and very light and easy to slice.
Thank you for this recipe Paola. I am diabetic and had been looking for a good recipe that looked and tasted like bread. I previously found another bread recipe that only worked for me if I made buns and not loaves….so I was very excited to try this….and it has become a staple in our house….the kids always ask for this bread. I have found that it doesn’t always have the rise I am looking for…..but it always tastes great. I have made quite a few things from your site!!….it has also become my go to site for great recipes…so once again…thank you.
Thank you so much for this recipe. I’ve made this recipe and your simple bread recipe and both came out perfect right from the start. I did follow the recipes EXACTLY, except for the fact that I don’t have a food processor so I had to “pulse” by hand which led me to believe that I had to stir in ingredients in large minimal swoops being careful not to over mix. Wondering if that is what other people had done when they’ve made this recipe without a food processor? As I said, it came out perfectly. just wondering if I was just lucky.
I buy whole golden flax seeds. I grind them very fine to use them so my flax seed meal is always fresh and not rancid. I have never tried it in bread so am going to give it a shot with this recipe. Hope it turns out. There are so many glowing comments for this bread. I don’t eat grains and usually just use cloud bread which I love but my grandchildren would prefer a “slice” of bread. Do you think this would turn out in a pullman pan?
I’ve used mini bread pans and small springform pans, square cake pans, clay loaf pans, USA pans, and I recently tried an extra-long loaf pan, equivalent of 2 loaves in 1 pan. I’ve substituted other nut flours (pistachio, hazelnut), other oils (olive, almond, hazelnut, butter) other liquids, including buttermilk, my current favorite, added seasoning ingredients, such as olives, sun-dried tomatoes, fresh and dried herbs and seasonings, tried it with caraway, dill, and a little tamarind powder for a “rye” flavor. Topped it with pine nuts or sesame seeds And of course we’ve enjoyed it many times over just as the recipe is written.
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I’ve been working on this Paleo Bread recipe for several months and have tested it a couple of dozen times. In fact, every time I create a recipe I test each and every ingredient addition or subtraction. That’s why I think it’s kinda funny when people leave comments below recipes (or on Instagram) asking how such and such ingredient substitution will turn out.
One flour you’ll definitely want to familiarize yourself with on Paleo is almond flour. It comes in handy in dozens of different baking applications and it provides a pretty darn good substitute to general purpose flour. This almond loaf was made using almond flour and a few select additional ingredients like coconut oil and apple cider vinegar. This recipe is good for showing you how easy it is to come up with a loaf of Paleo bread. It isn’t exactly rocket science so don’t be afraid to try it out if you’ve never made bread from scratch before.
Thank you so much for what you are doing! I’m making my second loaf now and my family enjoyed the first one immensely. I finally was able to enjoy a poached egg on toast again. Your recipes are so easy to follow, and even substitute with. For instance I just finished baking up a ton of your “thin mints”, and was low on Almond Flour, so I just threw in what I had, about a cup, and then added a half a cup of raw Pecans to the food processor and continued as directed on the recipe. It was perfect. So since I love to experiment, I’m making my second loaf with walnuts instead of pecans. It’s rising and looking beautiful. I can’t wait to try it.
This is the best gluten free bread recipe I’ve tried! So glad I found this. It’s not crumbly, very bread-like, just a bit dense. I loosely followed the recipe and changed a few things. I omitted the maple syrup to make it whole30. I didn’t have arrowroot so I subbed tapioca starch per some of the comments and added some chia seeds as well. Since there was so much coconut oil in it, I plan on experimenting and using olive oil so it doesn’t have too much of a coconut taste. My husband didn’t really notice it though. He is the gluten free one and he’s very picky about his bread, but this got his approval! I added some almonds on top and garlic and Italian herb seasoning to give it a flavor boost. I had trouble with this in the blender, maybe because I don’t have a very good one, so I will just use a mixing bowl next time. Thank you for sharing! I will be telling my friends about this!
Trick And Treat - how 'healthy eating' is making us ill by Barry Groves. The author is one of the world's most outspoken proponents of a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet. This book is an account of how and why the health-care establishment has got the concept of 'healthy eating' so wrong. Whereas Taubes work (see above) is a fairly straight forward review of the existing science, Groves expands into the politics of medical research and treatment to a much greater extent. "Trick and Treat" is divided into two parts. Part One describes the corruption in the health industry, points out the problems inherent in a high-carb, low-fat diet, and then prescribes a diet that leads to good health. The prescribed diet is high in fat - specifically animal fat, not polyunsaturated vegetable fat - and low in carbohydrates, with 60-70% of calories from fat, 15-25% of calories from protein, and a mere 10-15% of calories from carbohydrates. Part Two describes numerous diseases the author claims are the result of high carbohydrate consumption. These range from life-threatening disorders such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer to less serious problems such as acne, near-sightedness and dental problems. The Amazon reviews average to 4+ stars.
The New Evolution Diet: What Our Paleolithic Ancestors Can Teach Us about Weight Loss, Fitness, and Aging by Arthur De Vany. Art is the grandfather of the "Paleo Lifestyle" movement. The plan is built on three principles: (1) eat three meals a day made up of nonstarchy vegetables, fruits, and lean proteins; (2) skip meals occasionally to promote a low fasting blood insulin level; and (3) exercise less, not more, in shorter, high-intensity bursts. Note that the book is anti-fat. All oils are to be avoided, though canola is considered okay for higher temperatures. Egg yolks are to be skipped now and then. Published December 21, 2010.

We made the mix as directed. We then mixed 1/2 cup coconut sugar and 1 Tablespoon cinnamon in a separate container. Pour 1/2 of the bread mix in the pan, followed by 1/2 of the cinnamon/sugar mix. Then put the rest of the bread mix in the pan and cover with the rest of the cinnamon/sugar mix. Then swirl with a knife. Great bread for having with stew or soup!
First things first. And this is of utmost importance. Woot Woot is STILL cool. Says me. Because I say it all the time, so it just HAS to be cool, right?! Wait, since I’m the most uncool person on the planet, you probably should stop saying woot woot immediately. 😉 Second, I had ZERO clue you used to be an almond butter-making maniac! Oh I wish I was your bestie during THAT fun phase of your life! Now you are just a no-bake brainiac! (<– see what I did there?). These bars are FAB, just like all the rest of your no-bake bars! They look super creamy and uber dreamy… and most dangerous, because who in the world could eat just one (or 5) of these babies?! SO GOOD! Pinned of course! Cheers, sweets! And haaaaappy Galentine's Day!! XOXOXOX

Ana, We like using a combination of almond flour and coconut flour for this bread to achieve the best flavor and texture. We haven’t tried this bread using only coconut flour, but it may work. Coconut flour absorbs liquid differently, so you’ll want to use about 1/4 the amount of coconut flour as almond flour (since the recipe calls for 2 cups almond flour, that would be 1/2 cup coconut flour in addition to the 3/4 cup coconut flour that the recipe already calls for). However, the flavor and texture of this bread will likely be different with that substitution. Please let us know how it goes if you give it a try!
WOW! This bread is amazing! I have Gestational Diabetes, and have been struggling with bread since it has been spiking my sugars. Normally I don’t each much of it, but I was just craving it today. So I made a loaf and it is delicious! I went through the comments because I only have a full size loaf pan, and did as someone else mentioned, increased the recipe by .5 (for the eggs did 8 eggs rather than 7), and it came out the perfect size and absolutely delicious. Looking forward to enjoying it the rest of the week. I used a glass full size loaf and cooked for 40 minutes at 350 degrees. I topped it with extra flax seeds because I too love the nutty flavor of flax.
A strict paleo diet does not allow dairy products because hunter-gatherers did not milk cows. Some paleo dieters say dairy is OK, especially if it is grass-fed because grass-fed butter, for example, has more omega-3s. Fermented dairy products are also OK for some paleo eaters because they have a lower content of lactose and casein, the two concerns paleo dieters have with dairy.
I was very skeptical about this recipe. But I tell you what, I was pleasantly surprised when I ate one, thick with butter. I think one could describe them as close to what we call in New Zealand, ‘scones,’ but not sure what you call scones in the US is the same thing as here. Seeing as I haven’t had a scone in such a long time it was a treat. I don’t think I would use this recipe for buns though.
Evolution of the Human Diet: The Known, the Unknown, and the Unknowable by Peter S. Ungar. Diet is key to understanding the ecology and evolution of our distant ancestors and their kin, the early hominins. A study of the range of foods eaten by our progenitors underscores just how unhealthy many of our diets are today. This volume brings together authorities from disparate fields to offer new insights into the diets of our ancestors. Paleontologists, archaeologists, primatologists, nutritionists and other researchers all contribute pieces to the puzzle. The book has four sections: Reconstructed diets based on hominin fossils--tooth size, shape, structure, wear, and chemistry, mandibular biomechanics. Archaeological evidence of subsistence--stone tools and modified bones. Models of early hominin diets based on the diets of living primates--both human and non-human, paleoecology, and energetics. Nutritional analyses and their implications for evolutionary medicine.
I ran out of coconut oil last week and my replacement doesn’t arrive until tomorrow. Desperate to try this I used canolia oil instead. I acknowledge that it’s properties are very different than coconut oil. That said, the bread is fantastic, a bit oily (but I bet that is the fault of my decision), and the taste is really eggy almost like french toast. I also lack a food processor so I mixed it all by hand after sifting the flours together.
Hi Ginger, I personally haven’t tried making this bread into buns. I think the texture is a bit different, but it may work also. You could bake the batter into an english muffin pan like this one http://amzn.to/1TbU31n or this one http://amzn.to/23RkXeu. Please let me know how it goes if you try it and post a photo here so I can see how they turn out.

The Paleo Diet focuses on the mantra that if a caveman didn’t eat it, modern man shouldn’t either. This encompasses processed foods; any foods that have been harvested by the use of ranching or agriculture, such as grains or cane sugar; legumes, such as lentils, beans, peanuts and peas; potatoes; and dairy products, because early man didn’t raise cattle. All fruits and vegetables must be organic, and salt must be limited, because early man didn’t salt his food.


This way of eating has made me feel better in so many ways. I just had such a craving For the texture of cake or bread last night that I had a piece of cake and a sandwich wrap! I knew I had to find a way to satisfy that craving and considered eating a sandwich once a week. Now I can do it without too many carbs. Thanks for taking the time to make it come out right. No more carb BINGES for me.


hi, I’m trying paleo and loving it! Especially this bread . Omgoodness my whole family tried it and love it! So thank you. My question is , I’m trying to do proper food combining also. Meat with veg or carb with veg. So, is this bread considered a carb and not to be combined with meat ? ( doing proper food combining). Just wondering because it has no white flour. I know paleo doesn’t mean calorie free and fat free, but …??
Hi Tanya, thanks for your comment and sorry to hear you are having trouble finding the loaf pan. If you bake this bread in a 9×5 inch loaf pan it will be very flat, as this recipe only makes enough batter to fill the pan halfway. I haven’t tested this in other pans, so I’m not sure what would work. If you experiment with mini loaf pans please let us know how it goes, that might work and I’m curious to hear about it!
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One of the foods that people tell us they miss most after going keto is bread. (And cookies or cakes, but you get the idea.) We get it, bread is undeniably comfort food. Growing up, it wasn’t unheard of to eat toast for breakfast, a sandwich for lunch, and maybe even a slice of buttered bread along with dinner. Not only is that ton of carbs, but it’s also a lot of empty calories when we could have been eating real-food alternatives, like this bread made from nutrient-dense ingredients!
Alina Bradford is a contributing writer for Live Science. Over the past 16 years, Alina has covered everything from Ebola to androids while writing health, science and tech articles for major publications. She has multiple health, safety and lifesaving certifications from Oklahoma State University. Alina's goal in life is to try as many experiences as possible. To date, she has been a volunteer firefighter, a dispatcher, substitute teacher, artist, janitor, children's book author, pizza maker, event coordinator and much more.

I so miss bread fresh from the oven (I’m going to be adding the yeast)! You are absolutely correct about beaten egg whites creating air pockets. My family has always made buttermilk pancakes from scratch and we always separate the eggs, beat the whites to soft peaks and fold them in at the last minute. The pancakes rise beautifully! Have you tried this with your keto pancakes?
Almost equal numbers of advocates and critics seem to have gathered at the Paleo diet dinner table and both tribes have a few particularly vociferous members. Critiques of the Paleo diet range from the mild—Eh, it's certainly not the worst way to eat—to the acerbic: It is nonsensical and sometimes dangerously restrictive. Most recently, in her book Paleofantasy, evolutionary biologist Marlene Zuk of the University of California, Riverside, debunks what she identifies as myths central to the Paleo diet and the larger Paleo lifestyle movement.
Ok, I did mine a little different. I can’t eat the almond flour so I substituted non glutton Oat flour and I also added chia seeds. I wasn’t able to get the right sized pan, mine is the larger one, so I noticed that the bread wasn’t going to be very high, so …. I made another batch of bread, added it to the lower layer and cooked. Oh wow!! So good!! But I can’t eat it all at once. Poo! Anyway, don’t be afraid to use the bigger pan, just double the recipe.
I just made this today. It is awesome! I try to stay away from gluten as much as possible due to joint issues and pain. It helps considerably. This bread was easy and I even changed a few things. First, I put in 1/4 cup of hemp hearts in place of 1/4 cup of almond meal. For honey, I was out, I used date palm sugar. Finally, I was a bit short of coconut oil, so I added a bit of olive oil. The bread came out amazing. It fits into my diet, it is quick, easy, and yummy! Thanks so much.
I just stumbled upon your website today..perfect timing! I have been struggling with my first month of switching to the Paleo lifestyle. I love to cook, love to eat, and hate being restricted. Even though I very rarely crave pasta, grains, or dairy I was going a bit nutty because I’m now “not allowed” to have them. Your website has been a blessing. Already today I have made the silver dollar pancakes for breakfast, the Paleo bread for the rest of the week and have so many other recipes I can’t wait to try!

Hi Broke, so there are a few things that could be affecting the texture of your bread. First, do you have an oven thermometer to make sure the temperature is where you need it to be? This could affect the baking time. It’s ok if you need to bake it longer, and I would let it cook until you test the middle of the bread with a stick inserted into the center. Only when it comes out clean you remove it from the oven.
Obesity, heart disease, and diabetes: These are just a few of the health conditions that proponents of thePaleolithic diet, or caveman diet, blame on our sedentary lifestyles and modern diets, which are loaded with sugar, fat, and processed foods. Their proposed solution? Cut modern foods from our diet and return to the way our early hunter-gatherer ancestors ate.

Primal Body-Primal Mind: Beyond the Paleo Diet for Total Health and a Longer Life by Nora Gedgaudas advocates a diet that our paleo ancestors ate. Meat, lots of fat, and seasonal fruits and berries when available. Basically, sugar and starchy carbs are discouraged. You can download a chapter from the author's site. She has a Primal Body, Primal Mind Radio weekly show on Voice of America. It started May 20, 2009, so there are many shows you can listen to. Published June 30, 2011.
The Paleo Diet focuses on the mantra that if a caveman didn’t eat it, modern man shouldn’t either. This encompasses processed foods; any foods that have been harvested by the use of ranching or agriculture, such as grains or cane sugar; legumes, such as lentils, beans, peanuts and peas; potatoes; and dairy products, because early man didn’t raise cattle. All fruits and vegetables must be organic, and salt must be limited, because early man didn’t salt his food.
I’m so glad you love it, Tanya! Yes, $17 sounds like a lot for xanthan gum. I use this one here. Swerve is sweeter than erythritol, so you’d need less of it – I have a conversion chart here. You’re absolutely right about the xanthan gum and texture – it will make the bread more chewy. It will still be more of a “light and fluffy” bread, but definitely less muffin-like with the xanthan gum. I haven’t tried add-ins yet – let me know how it goes if you try!

For many years Arthur De Vany Ph.D. has been writing a book called Evolutionary Fitness on "What Evolution Teaches Us About How to Live and Stay Healthy." The diet he follows fits into my core diet definition. He may have been the first one to use the paleo diet to maximize fitness. His current site is Art's Blog on Fitness, Health, Aging, Nutrition and Exercise [archive.org].
Combining higher protein intake and fresh vegetables leads to another major benefit: blood sugar stabilization. Between 35 and 45 percent of the average Paleo diet is comprised of non-starchy fresh fruits and vegetables that won’t spike blood sugar levels, making it an optimal diet for diabetes prevention. This is because nearly all of these foods have low glycemic indices that are slowly digested and absorbed by the body.
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