It’s hard to make substitutions, but if I was to experiment with a different nut-free flour I would use pumpkin or sunflower seed flour (same amount). These may be hard to find so you can make your own. The process is the same for making almond flour and I have a video tutorial here: https://livinghealthywithchocolate.com/desserts/how-to-blanch-almonds-and-make-almond-flour-8387/

WOW! This bread is amazing! I have Gestational Diabetes, and have been struggling with bread since it has been spiking my sugars. Normally I don’t each much of it, but I was just craving it today. So I made a loaf and it is delicious! I went through the comments because I only have a full size loaf pan, and did as someone else mentioned, increased the recipe by .5 (for the eggs did 8 eggs rather than 7), and it came out the perfect size and absolutely delicious. Looking forward to enjoying it the rest of the week. I used a glass full size loaf and cooked for 40 minutes at 350 degrees. I topped it with extra flax seeds because I too love the nutty flavor of flax.
Hi, Elana. Just wanted to let you know that I love this bread recipe. I make it all the time. Not long ago, I had an epic fail because I forgot to let my ingredients come to room temperature. I had quite an issue with tunneling. The bread was unusable for slicing, but I decided to cube it and dry it in the oven so I’d have some gluten-free bread for stuffing. I used it to convert my treasured cornbread stuffing recipe to a gluten-free version, and it turned out great. My recipe will be featured on my blog(www.gardenforestfield.com), with a link to your bread recipe, on Monday, Nov. 18th. Thanks for all you do.
Jazzmin, you are correct and the active cultures in the yogurt will not survive during baking. However, the reason why I mentioned those facts about yogurt on my post is because a lot of people following a paleo diet simply won’t eat dairy because at one point dairy was classified as “not paleo”. There are so many amazing health benefits from eating fermented foods and raw, organic dairy from pasture raised animals that I feel it is important to educate people.
I’m so glad you love it, Tanya! Yes, $17 sounds like a lot for xanthan gum. I use this one here. Swerve is sweeter than erythritol, so you’d need less of it – I have a conversion chart here. You’re absolutely right about the xanthan gum and texture – it will make the bread more chewy. It will still be more of a “light and fluffy” bread, but definitely less muffin-like with the xanthan gum. I haven’t tried add-ins yet – let me know how it goes if you try!
How inventive!! Elana, we would love for you to share this wonderful recipe with our community since I know our Paleo/Primal friends will just love this. If you’re interested, please take a minute to submit the recipe at fastpaleo.com/upload-a-recipe/. Feel free to plug your blog at the beginning of the directions section, and we’re more than happy to give your Facebook page a shoutout when we post it! This is exactly the kind of delicious and healthy recipe people are asking for!
This is great! I have tried GF bread recipes numerous times, to no avail… which was very disheartening, since I can make wonderful wheat bread without even thinking about it! But THIS recipe turned out great! It made a fluffy, moist bread that held up to slicing, holding burgers, everything you could want in a bread! And it couldn’t get any simpler to make. I doubled the recipe and baked in a loaf pan for 30min as suggested above, since I don’t have the rings, and it was great. Thank you for an awesome recipe!
Have to laugh with me — I mixed it all up in my cuisinart, popped it in the perfect sized, non stick bread pan and put it in the oven for 5 minutes before I realized I’d forgotten the Apple Cider Vinegar! (Which helps the baking soda do its work, right?) I grabbed it out, poured the vinegar on top and stirred it up and shoved it back in. It came out fine, believe it or not! I’m having earth balance margarine on it, with some honey, Yum.
Best bread I’ve found so far! I just used almond meal instead of blanched almond flour as I haven’t gotten around to buying any yet but it is so yummy! Had some left over chicken from a roast last night and it was definitely one of the best chicken sandwiches I’ve had for a long time! Same as Kai though I think I’ll drop back the coconut oil next time by maybe a tbs or 2 🙂
Carol: For anyone gluten intolerant, or worse, that’s a given. What quickly becomes apparent to anyone providing for this aspect of diet and reads labels, is that commercially available i.e. highly processed versions of bread etc are ridiculously loaded with poor quality fats, sugars and yet other refined flours etc to ‘compensate’ for wheat comfort. No, gluten free food, as in what is usually available to mimic where flour is widely used ‘n’ enjoyed in bought ready-to-eat products, is far from healthy…. why we’re here!
These donut holes do not add to your waistline, so they’re are a definite win in our books! Make sure you stick to the coconut sugar in this recipe to keep it completely Paleo-friendly. Coconut sugar is derived naturally from the sap of a coconut palm tree. Unlike a white table sugar that has a glycemic index of 65, coconut sugar has a much lower glycemic index of 35.

Hi, I’ve made this recipe twice and LOVE the taste. However, both times the bread would rise so high in the oven, but as soon as I take it out to cool it deflated and middle sink down. What could’ve gone wrong? Over mixing? I did switch coconut flour to all almond flour instead. Could that be a problem? Please help as I’m anxious to make another batch. Thank you.

I haven’t tested this recipe without tapioca starch, but in the Notes section above I list a few of the substitutions I’ve tested and had success with. Tapioca starch helps to add rise and bounce to this loaf, making it somewhat “fluffy” and closer to the texture of regular bread. If you decide to experiment with this recipe using something other than tapioca starch, please let me know what works!
The Hiwi gather and hunt a diverse group of plants and animals from the savannas, forests, rivers and swamps. Their main sources of meat are capybara, collared peccary, deer, anteater, armadillo, and feral cattle, numerous species of fish, and at least some turtle species. Less commonly consumed animals include iguanas and savanna lizards, wild rabbits, and many birds. Not exactly the kind of meat Paleo dieters and others in urban areas can easily obtain.
The NY Times had a blog article on Good News on Saturated Fat which is reporting on Gary Taubes's interpretation of the new report in The New England Journal of Medicine on a two-year diet experiment in Israel. A followup is the post The Fat Fight Goes On where Gary rebuts the arguments against the study. And here's a good interview with Taubes (and includes a good summary): Gary Taubes on Cold Fusion, Good Nutrition and What Makes Bad (and Good) Science.
LOREN CORDAIN, Ph.D., is one of the top global researchers in the area of evolutionary medicine. Generally acknowledged as the world's leading expert on the Paleolithic diet, he is a professor in the Health and Exercise Science Department at Colorado State University. Dr. Cordain and his research have been featured on Dateline NBC and in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and other media. He is the author of The Paleo Diet and The Paleo Diet Cookbook, among other books, and makes regular media and speaking appearances worldwide.
Paleo Thin Bread® – Almond ( Paleo Bread ) (1 Net Carb) (3 Pack w/Free Shipping), is a great way to enjoy a healthy meal or snack with added flavor and health benefits. Paleo Bread – Almond is Gluten Free, Grain Free, Yeast Free, Soy Free, GMO Free, (7g Of Protein Per Slice), Low Carb and best of all delicious. Paleo Bread -Almond loaf contains six simple ingredients! *Nutritional Information Provided By Medallion Labs For Nutritional Accuracy **Freezes great for 12 Months** / Stay In Ketosis**”Paleo Breads Are Soft & Fluffy & Does NOT Crumble”
The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living: An Expert Guide to Making the Life-Saving Benefits of Carbohydrate Restriction Sustainable and Enjoyable by Stephen D. Phinney and Jeff S. Volek synthesizes the science into one readable source. The book is excellent for general low-carb high-fat moderate protein diets. While they begin with the idea that we should eat like a caveman, they do not follow the conclusion to its logical end and have us avoid the classes of foods our ancestors would have found unrecognizable. They avoid the metobolic syndrome, but not the autoimmune diseases. They mention that monosaturates should be favored, though they are not emphasized in the menu example. The book's daily menu examples also all include dairy in one form or another. No tips are given tips for those who do not do dairy. Published May 19, 2011. The Amazon reviews average to 4+.

Hi Danielle, The bread will not rise without the baking powder, but you could try it if you don’t mind that. Some people make homemade baking powder with baking soda, cream of tartar, and arrowroot powder. But, arrowroot is still a very small amount of starch. Divided among the slices, it’s actually fewer carbs than some of the other ingredients (e.g. almond flour has a small amount of carbs also).


I buy whole golden flax seeds. I grind them very fine to use them so my flax seed meal is always fresh and not rancid. I have never tried it in bread so am going to give it a shot with this recipe. Hope it turns out. There are so many glowing comments for this bread. I don’t eat grains and usually just use cloud bread which I love but my grandchildren would prefer a “slice” of bread. Do you think this would turn out in a pullman pan?
I am new to the Paleo diet and cooking with Almond Flour. I decided to try your Paleo Bread recipe first and it did not turn out the way yours looks in the picture…..instead it was more grainy and extremely dense, did not resemble bread in any way shape or form :-( I did not have coconut flour so that is the only ingredient I left out but I am hoping you can help me find the error in my ways. Please help!
The Paleo diet not only misunderstands how our own species, the organisms inside our bodies and the animals and plants we eat have evolved over the last 10,000 years, it also ignores much of the evidence about our ancestors' health during their—often brief—individual life spans (even if a minority of our Paleo ancestors made it into their 40s or beyond, many children likely died before age 15). In contrast to Grok, neither Paleo hunter–gatherers nor our more recent predecessors were sculpted Adonises immune to all disease. A recent study in The Lancet looked for signs of atherosclerosis—arteries clogged with cholesterol and fats—in more than one hundred ancient mummies from societies of farmers, foragers and hunter–gatherers around the world, including Egypt, Peru, the southwestern U.S and the Aleutian Islands. "A common assumption is that atherosclerosis is predominately lifestyle-related, and that if modern human beings could emulate preindustrial or even preagricultural lifestyles, that atherosclerosis, or least its clinical manifestations, would be avoided," the researchers wrote. But they found evidence of probable or definite atherosclerosis in 47 of 137 mummies from each of the different geographical regions. And even if heart disease, cancer, obesity and diabetes were not as common among our predecessors, they still faced numerous threats to their health that modern sanitation and medicine have rendered negligible for people in industrialized nations, such as infestations of parasites and certain lethal bacterial and viral infections.
Our bodies need much more protein than the average person consumes. In fact, protein accounts for only 15 percent of the average person’s daily calories, while 19 to 35 percent of the average hunter-gatherer diet was comprised of protein. This was due to the high consumption of meat, seafood, and other animal products prevalent in contemporary approaches to Paleo eating.
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Hi Meredith, every photo I share with my recipes are from the same recipe. I usually photograph the food right after I make them. This bread does not rise as much as regular bread during baking, but it does rise well. I use golden flax seeds. This recipe is meant to be made on a medium loaf pan of 8½ x 4½ inches. If you have a larger pan, you can double the recipe so that when baked the bread will rise to the top of your pan and will not be so thin.
What did I do wrong? This came out VERY moist… like a banana bread. Nothing like loaf/sandwich bread. I did end up cooking it nearly 31 minutes because pick still wasn’t coming out clean. Mine seems much darker too. I didn’t use the flax seeds (daughter has a sensory issue with nuts/seeds in breads) (You’ll notice I put sesame seeds on half for me…would that make it that much different? I used the proper size – but glass pan (all I have in loaf style) Flavor is good… but far too dense to consider using for a sandwich and not sure how Biikeweaver got 18 servings (!?) from this size loaf pan? But THANK YOU for posting. This was my FIRST attempt, so I’ll try again!
I made the dinner rolls today and the recipe worked great. I lightly greased a muffin pan, used a scant half cup of batter for each roll, baked for 15-18 minutes and they are perfect for holiday dinners. My yeild was 13 rolls. Good thing there was extra, because I ate one hot from the oven. I also used coconut vinegar and coconut nectar instead of apple cider vinegar and honey. Yum, Yum, Yum
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