Hi Anita, I double checked my carton egg whites. 3/4 cup of egg whites is equivalent to 4 large whole eggs, not 4 large egg whites. Mine has a chart for converting whole eggs, and the conversion for egg whites only is below the chart. It says 2 tablespoons of liquid egg whites are equivalent to the egg white of 1 whole egg. So, 12 large egg whites would be 24 tablespoons, or 1 1/2 cups as written in the recipe. Hope this helps!

Life Without Bread: How a Low-Carbohydrate Diet Can Save Your Life by Christian B. Allan, Wolfgang Lutz. It is based on Dr. Lutz's work with thousands of patients in Austria. It deals with the health issues connected to high carb consumption. It is basically an English version and update of Dr. Lutz's 1967 book with the same title: Leben ohne Brot. He recommends eating only 72 grams of carbohydrates, and an unlimited amount of fat. And provides evidence as to why this is the healthiest diet. Read the review at Amazon by Todd Moody (it will be first!). See excerpts from his earlier edition: Dismantling a Myth: The Role of Fat and Carbohydrates in our Diet
In making the case for meat, Cordain presents anecdotal evidence of Eskimos who lived their full life without a heart attack. The Eskimo diet consists of 97% meat, which he concedes causes all Eskimos to develop atherosclerosis—a common precursor to heart disease. But Cordain says Eskimos never die of heart disease. He discusses one Eskimo who lived 45 years and another who lived 53 years, both without heart disease! He then jumps to the conclusion that because these Eskimos didn’t get heart attacks, even with severe atherosclerosis, meat must have protected them from heart disease. So Cordain’s best case for lots of meat is that you can live to the ripe age of 45 or even 53 without a heart attack. But do people—even unhealthy smokers or the obese—generally get heart attacks before age 53?
Hi Sonda, glad you like it! I use a free nutrition calculator on the website sparkrecipes.com, which generates the nutrition table. You just put in all your ingredients and number of portions and it does the rest of the work for you. I cannot guarantee whatever comes out is 100% accurate, it is thought to be a guide. If you need to rely on nutrition info for health reasons, you’d have to make your own calculations.
Angie, I’m happy to hear you and your hubby enjoyed the taste, but sorry to hear the bread was flat! The egg whites don’t need to be whipped for this recipe, but I’ll try to help you troubleshoot…first I would check to make sure that your baking powder is fresh. Also, did you use the full cup of egg whites? Did you make any ingredient substitutions or adjustments? Did you use a 9 by 5-inch loaf pan? Did you cook it at 350F and is your oven properly calibrated? Did you bake it for the amount of time the recipe calls for? I hope this helps!
Michele, this is the most delicious bread and can’t believe it’s paleo. So easy to make and keep. After a few days of keeping it out, I cut the rest into slices, put slice sized parchment paper between each one and freeze. I save the parchment for future loaves. Getting ready to make another one. It’s so delicious! Thank you for all your attempts to perfect it. YUM!!
OMG…Could your FABULOUS coconut palm syrup/recipe be used/considered as the ultra-expensive COCONUT NECTAR?..If so…this is sheer BRILLIANCE as it has provided a needed “Eureka” moment for me in my quest for a low glycemic substitute for agave or honey..Is the resulting syrup suitable for use in this fashion in baking?…Thank you so much for contributing your wonderful idea.
I wish I had taken a photo because this bread is gorgeous! My husband (who is anti-healthy food) said “I see bread like that and I want to eat it…but since you told me it was made with almonds I won’t, out of spite”…and then 10 minutes later…”that would taste really good toasted with butter” (and a big chunk was missing from the loaf). So easy to make with ingredients I always have on hand. Bravo! I will be making this weekly!

Hi Valerie, so funny, I just got asked this question! 🙂 Here’s what I said, “…almond flour is a lot less absorbent than coconut flour (like A LOT). I know a few people have tried using oat flour with success, but I worry that almond flour would not be sufficient for absorbing the almond butter and creating a nice, firm texture. I’d recommend starting with about 3/4 cup almond flour, and experimenting as needed.” Hope this helps!

YUM! I am going into week 3 of Paleo and missed bread. This is yummy although I need I smaller pan because it’s short. Not that that matters, I eat it alone or with grass-fed butter anyway! 🙂 I did have flax seeds, just the ground flax. And I used coconut oil (not butter) and coconut cream. It came out great! I cooked it for 35 minutes because even though the toothpick came out clean, it still didn’t “look” done. 35 minutes was perfect! Thanks for the recipe!
Thanks for asking (kinda). Back in the day, about two years ago, I baked nonstop. I baked even more than I do now that I have a food blog (which is A LOT). Every day, I would make 4-6 batches of cookies. Then, I’d make nice cream (which was called banana soft serve back then), meal prep for the next two weeks, then spend the night putting together packages for my sisters.
In order to simulate a bread-like texture without using gluten, grain free and gluten free bread recipes often use a variety of different flours and binders. We’ve tried so many keto bread recipes that taste way too eggy or too much like almonds or coconut. The trick is to find a combination of ingredients that yields good flavor, as well as bready texture and a loaf that rises nicely.
I am excited about this recipe for Paleo Sandwich Bread because even though it is completely grain and gluten free, it tastes amazing and the consistency is moist and soft just like the sandwich breads we were used to before changing our diet. In my opinion though, there is also a tiny hint of sweetness to it and this is due to the almond flour being sweeter than grain wheat flour.
Nice and firm. Baked it on the recommended temp, added 6 or 7 minutes. Pressed the middle and it was great. I let it cool. What was nice about it was obviously it’s low carb bread…hurray for that, but it cut well. Got 18 slices easily about 1/2 inch thick without breakage. Most importantly, it wasn’t greasy, or almond tasting overload, just delicious.
Whether you're living the paleo lifestyle or you're just looking for some new and fun recipes, these easy desserts are a great way to satisfy that sweet tooth. Not only are these treats considered paleo, but they're also fast, simple, and totally delicious. With chocolate recipes, be sure to pick a dark chocolate, the darker the better. And as a general guideline, stay away from granulated sugar and instead opt for natural sweetners like coconut sugar, agave, or raw honey, all of which are paleo-approved. 
Since doing low carb the one thing I’ve really missed is bread. I used to eat it with almost every meal. My wife has been very negative about paleo bread recipes saying that it would be dry and crumbly. Well, I made some bean soup with ham and finally made your microwave bread. IT WAS FANTASTIC!!!!! I gave my wife a bite and she was amazed. It was moist, soft and delicious. Especially good knowing that it’s good for me, with no gluten or any other killers. Thank you so much for this recipe.
Cordain argues that chimpanzees and horses avoid meat, and they have big bellies that we would have if we didn’t ditch plants for meat. He also says meat increased human brain size, and decreased stomach size so we can have the six-pack abs that chimps can’t. But I looked at his endnotes with citations to research and couldn’t find the source for these theories. I also couldn’t find research showing that legumes and grains were invented by humans.

I made this for the first time today. I’m guessing here, but you may have mixed it too well, meaning the gas produced by the baking soda/yogurt/vinegar mixture was spent by the time you got it into the pan. No reaction means no gas, no gas means no lift. (I gently folded mine together and the rise brought it up above the top of the pan, just in the middle, but still.)
Gah, do you feel like I say that enough? Haha. But really, the way our bodies respond to certain foods and digestion is so individualized. I think it’ definitely depends on our gut flora, hormones, environment we are living, etc. Which is why I like to make gluten free allergy friendly recipes. Some people need grain free, nut free, others feel better on an egg free or vegan diet, and some are just starting off eating a gluten free diet and are overwhelmed.
Was very excited to try this recipe (amended version) because it did not call for rice flour and because it was GF and Paleo. However, after spending the $15.00 + $11.00(s/h) for the pan, and the cost of the ingredients, I am very disappointed. Bread looked good and spelled good until cutting it and found that the center was raw, gooey, and smelled bad. Had to throw it all away.

I made this bread and really do like it~ we are paleo and needed a good bread recipe. What I am wondering is how the picture you have of this bread is so light and yellow colored? After making it, the bread is dark and even has a green tint to it over time. The texture and taste are both perfect, but it doesn’t look appetizing~ trying to figure out how mine looks so different than the picture of your bread. I noticed that the pictures other people posted also showed dark bread as well. I used all of the recommended ingredients exactly- but it does not come out light or yellowy. Any recommendations?
Following the paleo diet can be pricey. Inexpensive and healthy non-meat protein sources like soy and beans are off-limits, and a recent BMJ Open study shows that healthy meats like lean ground beef and boneless, skinless chicken breasts cost an average of 29 cents more per serving compared to less-healthy ones, such as high-fat ground beef and chicken drumsticks. Even switching from peanut butter to paleo-approved almond butter will cost you—it goes for up to $13 a jar.

The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living: An Expert Guide to Making the Life-Saving Benefits of Carbohydrate Restriction Sustainable and Enjoyable by Stephen D. Phinney and Jeff S. Volek synthesizes the science into one readable source. The book is excellent for general low-carb high-fat moderate protein diets. While they begin with the idea that we should eat like a caveman, they do not follow the conclusion to its logical end and have us avoid the classes of foods our ancestors would have found unrecognizable. They avoid the metobolic syndrome, but not the autoimmune diseases. They mention that monosaturates should be favored, though they are not emphasized in the menu example. The book's daily menu examples also all include dairy in one form or another. No tips are given tips for those who do not do dairy. Published May 19, 2011. The Amazon reviews average to 4+.
The paleo diet is meant to mimic what our preagricultural, hunter-gatherer ancestors ate. The premise is that the current Western diet is contributing to the rise of chronic diseases such as obesity, heart disease and cancer. This diet, paleo proponents claim, can reduce inflammation, improve workouts, increase energy, help with weight loss, stabilize blood sugar and even reduce the risk of chronic diseases.
Carol: For anyone gluten intolerant, or worse, that’s a given. What quickly becomes apparent to anyone providing for this aspect of diet and reads labels, is that commercially available i.e. highly processed versions of bread etc are ridiculously loaded with poor quality fats, sugars and yet other refined flours etc to ‘compensate’ for wheat comfort. No, gluten free food, as in what is usually available to mimic where flour is widely used ‘n’ enjoyed in bought ready-to-eat products, is far from healthy…. why we’re here!
What a fantastic recipe! I just made this and my house smells like sweet, toasty almonds. The texture is light and fluffy. Can’t wait to toast it gently in my oven in the morning with a little peach jam :) I used a glass pyrex loaf pan and lined it with parchment paper and lightly oiled it with coconut oil and it came out perfect,for anyone wondering about the specific pan you mentioned, which i haven’t heard of either. Thanks for this great recipe!
Deepika, It’s hard to tell exactly where the discrepancy occurred without being in the kitchen with you, but I can try to help. There is (surprisingly) quite a bit of variance between different brands, so if you used a different brand for almond flour, coconut flour, etc. that could have been a contributing factor. Also, was your ghee or coconut oil melted like the recipe says? Out of curiosity, how did the recipe turn out?
Some randomized controlled trials have shown the Paleo diet to produce greater short-term benefits than diets based on national nutrition guidelines, including greater weight loss, reduced waist circumference, decreased blood pressure, increased insulin sensitivity, and improved cholesterol. However these studies were of short duration (6 months or less) with a small number of participants (less than 40). [4-6]

Thanks for asking (kinda). Back in the day, about two years ago, I baked nonstop. I baked even more than I do now that I have a food blog (which is A LOT). Every day, I would make 4-6 batches of cookies. Then, I’d make nice cream (which was called banana soft serve back then), meal prep for the next two weeks, then spend the night putting together packages for my sisters.
Hi~ I tried to read all of the reviews to find this answer before asking, but there are a LOT of them! Instead, I’ll just ask 🙂 My husband cannot have anything almond related at the moment. Are there any other flours that would work instead of almond flour? I’ve made soooo many loaves of bread, and every single one of them was pretty terrible, and that’s even w/ very lowered standards! I also swore I’d not make another bread, but here I am…. Also, I’d have to sub in duck eggs for chicken eggs, which could throw another wrench into the plans.
Our bodies need much more protein than the average person consumes. In fact, protein accounts for only 15 percent of the average person’s daily calories, while 19 to 35 percent of the average hunter-gatherer diet was comprised of protein. This was due to the high consumption of meat, seafood, and other animal products prevalent in contemporary approaches to Paleo eating.

Thanks for reading this post. Of these recipes, pick one that sounds good to, and try it. These are all good recipes and fairly easy to make, I like to make the Cheesy Tapioca Flatbread, as its pretty quick and tastes great. I’ve got lots of paleo resources and recipes on here, so click around to find out more about paleo. Keep me posted on how things go and always feel free to share a story or ask a question.

Hi Ginger, I personally haven’t tried making this bread into buns. I think the texture is a bit different, but it may work also. You could bake the batter into an english muffin pan like this one http://amzn.to/1TbU31n or this one http://amzn.to/23RkXeu. Please let me know how it goes if you try it and post a photo here so I can see how they turn out.

Alright. So I saw this recipe yesterday, and knew I had to make it- even on a weeknight. Blender bread = so so easy (thank you!) Long story short, we’ve already eaten the whole loaf. My husband made awesome BLT’s for dinner, my toddler helped himself to a couple after dinner pieces. 😀 THEN. This morning my husband used the remaining slices to make open face breakfast sammies… runny egg and all. I did bake the loaf for quite a bit longer than you posted… but I’m pretty sure that is a reflection of our sad oven more than anything else. The bread has an awesome rustic texture… I’m going to try bruschetta with it next!! We did give each slice a quick fry in bacon grease to “toast” right before serving. Sidenote, I’m 6mo pregnant… so 2 full BLT’s is totally the norm for me right now 😀 Anyway, THANK YOU! This is my first time landing at your site… and I can’t wait to explore more of your recipes!!
"Loren Cordain's extensive research demonstrates how modern westernized diets drastically depart from the original diet humans consumed for millions of years. In The Paleo Diet and The Paleo Diet Cookbook, Dr. Cordain shows how diets high in grains, dairy, vegetable oils, salt, and refined sugars are at odds with our genetic legacy and then shares his uncomplicated strategy for losing weight and getting healthy."
This recipe is so simple but so tasty. I use almond flour I grind myself (use a coffee grinder–it’s so much cheaper than buying bags of almond flour at the grocery store or online). The first loaf I made as stated and felt it was a little too much on the coconut. The second loaf I exchanged the coconut oil for bacon grease, which worked well but was a little too strong on the bacon. The third loaf I used half coconut oil and half bacon grease and I really love the taste. A little smear of almond butter and a dollop of jam really makes this a great Paleo breakfast!
We’re in a position to understand more of the benefits of the Paleo diet now that we have a basic understanding of which food sources are emphasized. One major benefit of the Paleo diet is an increased consumption of vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and plant phytochemicals. Whole grains are not a good substitute for grass-produced or free-ranging meats, fruits, and veggies, as they contain no vitamin C, vitamin A, or vitamin B12. Many of the minerals and some of the B vitamins whole grains do contain are not absorbed efficiently by the body. The Paleo diet cuts out whole grains and replaces them with unprocessed, fresh foods.
“All plants contain chlorogenic acid, mostly in the stems and leaves, but sunflowers also have it in the seeds. A spokeswoman for Red River Commodities says that SunButter does indeed turn cookies and other baked products green as they cool. The solution, she says, is to reduce the amount of baking soda or baking powder in your recipe by almost half, which balances the acidity of the ingredients and keeps them from changing color. Whether your cookies will rise adequately with half the leaven is a good question, but she says some people who have gotten in touch with the company say they don’t notice any difference. Adding a bit of lemon juice to your dough or batter can also help maintain expected colors. ”
Fast forward 15 years later and I live in my own house with air conditioning and I make the rules. 🙂 But even though I still turn the oven on to bake in the summer (I just have to some days! Hello, it’s my job.) I still have the notion that summertime = no ovens. So I’m always looking for healthy treats to make that don’t require the oven or much effort.
I’ve used mini bread pans and small springform pans, square cake pans, clay loaf pans, USA pans, and I recently tried an extra-long loaf pan, equivalent of 2 loaves in 1 pan. I’ve substituted other nut flours (pistachio, hazelnut), other oils (olive, almond, hazelnut, butter) other liquids, including buttermilk, my current favorite, added seasoning ingredients, such as olives, sun-dried tomatoes, fresh and dried herbs and seasonings, tried it with caraway, dill, and a little tamarind powder for a “rye” flavor. Topped it with pine nuts or sesame seeds And of course we’ve enjoyed it many times over just as the recipe is written.
I’ve made these twice now. First time – subbed coconut oil for the palm shortening – simply because I didn’t have any. Only had one egg so used a “chia” egg as well. Baked them in ramekins. Turned out wonderful!! Second time – baked them this morning – needed an “muffin” for my egg/kale breaky. This time used “tenderfake” – lard – again no palm shortening – used 2 real, free range, organic eggs. Baked them in standard muffin tins – once again – turned out beautifully! Especially when toasted 🙂
I have made this several times and have always dbl’d the recipe as I have a large loaf pan. I have made a few modifications to it over the last couple of batches ~ I changed out the soda for baking powder! Seems to have created greater loft. I changed out the arrowroot powder for tapioca flour, which I like better ( although no difference in flavor, some in texture). I lowered the oven temp to 325 and increased the baking time to 55 min to insure the interior center was cooked. This last bake, I added about a cup of dried currants and it was fabulous. Just a hint of sweet ever so often is a wonderful addition.
Hi Jodi, I haven’t tried that, but don’t think it would work well for this recipe. First, yeast needs sugar (for it to consume – it’s not typically in the end result), so you’d need to add that. But also, just with how we are making the bread fluffy with beaten egg whites, I don’t think yeast would work. If you want to try adding yeast to a low carb bread, I would do it with this low carb bread recipe instead.
Love this bread only bread other then what I make at home I can eat. I have celiac disease, and Ulcerative Colitis, I have a allergy to corn, intolerance to carbs, yeast, soy, dairy, among a few other things. Julian Bakery Almond Bread is a life saver, reminds me of whole grain bread from my child hood. I love to put nutivia butter flavored coconut oil on it and toast it with cinnamon. IT does have to be toasted to hold up well but raw I like to use it to scramble in with eggs sometimes. Toasted it is great with almond butter and sugar free jam, avacado and eggs, bit of avacado mayo, and what ever else you wish. I find they work better as open sandwiches, then a true sandwich. Other thoughts try topping them with a paleo cheese after toasting and slowly warm it up to melt it on (Julian paleo cheese can take a bit to melt so low and slow as to not burn it) and it makes a lovely cheesy bread. One of my oddest and favorite things is a bit of nutiva butter flavored coconut oil and some caraway seeds as this makes it taste like a rye bread I use to eat as a child before my diagnosis.

Need a recommendation for a substitution for Golden Flaxseed Meal. It disagrees with me no matter how slowly I try to reintroduce into my diet. Causes painful sleep interrupting churning and cramping in my GI tract, even though I drink three quarts of water daily. Also should not consume GFM because I take a blood thinner and estrogen. Find this bread recipe addictive (especially substituting and doubling quantity B grade maple syrup for the honey + adding 1/4 chia seeds)…but the GFM is a truly painful experience. Help!

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Hi John, You could possible try a hand mixer in a bowl instead of the food processor, but I haven’t tried it, so can’t vouch for the results. Most likely the bread would not be as tall because the mixer would completely deflate the first half of the egg whites when you add them to the batter. The second half should be folded so that part will be find. If you try with a bowl and hand mixer, let me know how that goes.

In any case, I was finally able to have a little sample of bread and butter which was thrilling and so yummy. I originally intended to make turkey sandwiches with the loaf, but may end up repurposing it. It would make some great croutons for the Gnom-Gnom stuffing recipe. But I can also see some bruschetta in my near future. By cutting the loaf horizontally, I think I can still manage to get at least one turkey sandwich out of it this week. That’s if I don’t keep sneaking little slices for bread and butter 😉
I have a question for you about eggs. Do you have any particular size or volume of “egg” that you tend to use in your recipes? In most of my cookbooks, an “egg” means a medium sized egg that yields about 50mls by volume, so there are slightly more than 5 eggs in a cup. I tend to buy extra large eggs locally, and I find that when a recipe calls for more than 3 eggs, the end result is quite “egg-y.” I’m going to experiment, but perhaps you would be able to tell me if there is a size or volume of egg that you tend to use in your recipes. (I didn’t see anything specific under the “ingredient” menu on your blog.)
Hi Christy, It might be a little more difficult, but in theory possible. You’d need to stir the dry ingredients, then use a hand mixer instead of food processor to mix them with the butter. Then, after beating the egg whites separately, you’d need to mix in part of them, trying not to break them down, then fold in the rest once it’s easier to fold.
Just made this bread tonight and I love the texture. I am still deciding on the taste. It reminds me of cornbread which isn’t a bad thing, necessarily. I think when I make an actual sandwich out of it I will not even notice the difference. Also thinking it could be good for a casserole of some sort. We also had your Chipotle Orange Chicken and that was a big hit! I am loving this site, a huge THANK YOU!
Protein is a staple of the caveman diet- specifically options that are grass-fed, wild caught or organic, as these options are often from animals raised in environments that encourage natural behavior. And because our ancestors didn't just live off chicken and beef, they hunted a wide variety of meat, the more variety you can add to your proteins, the better!
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