This was my first attempt at GF baking…and it turned out okay as in it’s not burnt and definately edible. I think I had glass pan issues…and I didn’t realize you had to melt the coconut oil since the recipe didn’t specify in liquid form vs soft solid…but my main comments is that it’s just too eggy. Like French toast eggy. Definately not what I’m looking for as a GF bread option to eat in the morning WITH EGGS. On to the next recipe.
I decided to make these magic little bars into paleo 7 layer bars to avoid all the refined sugar and grains that you’ll typically find in a 7 layer bar. There was just one last question I needed to have answered: What’s the difference between magic bars and 7 layer bars???  I finally found out: NOTHING!  You could easily just call these bars 7 layer magic bars.

Slight changes I had to make: pumpkin puree in place of the applesauce (1:1), a whoopie pie pan in place of the ring molds, and I baked for 12 minutes instead of 15. The pan yielded 8 “rolls” which I sliced *very* thinly to make some jam and nut butter sandwiches. Delicious! Thanks so much for the recipe! (I found this recipe via Pinterest, by the way.)
Hi Julia, If you use a larger size pan than I indicate for the recipe, your batter won’t fill it up and your loaf will be flat. Another example is if you fill a 1/2 cup with 1/2 cup of water, the water comes to the top of the cup, if you transfer that 1/2 cup of water to a 1 cup measuring cup, it will only fill it halfway. That’s what’s happening to the bread when the pan used it too large :-)
Jazzmin, you are correct and the active cultures in the yogurt will not survive during baking. However, the reason why I mentioned those facts about yogurt on my post is because a lot of people following a paleo diet simply won’t eat dairy because at one point dairy was classified as “not paleo”. There are so many amazing health benefits from eating fermented foods and raw, organic dairy from pasture raised animals that I feel it is important to educate people.
I didn’t have almond flour so substituted 1 cup millet flour and 1 cup sorghum flour for the almond flour, and baked in an 7.5″ x 4.5″ x 2.5″ loaf pan. The loaf was short, about 1.5″ tall, the texture was pleasantly dense and held together well. The taste, however, was pasty (like flour) and the bread was dry. (I noticed afterwards that the sorghum flour package said to substitute 15-20% sorghum flour in your recipe, so that may have affected the taste and dryness.) I tried a slice with a topping of honey, and that was pretty good, but not good enough. So I made croutons, which were delicious. I cut the bread into small cubes and spread them on a cookie sheet, sprayed them with olive oil spray and drizzled 1/2 stick of butter over them, then seasoned generously with Nature’s Seasonings and garlic powder (for a richer crouton, could also sprinkle with parmesan cheese). I tossed them to distribute the seasonings and baked them at 350 degrees about 20 minutes until crunchy. I’ll try the recipe again when I have almond flour.

I don’t have a processor big enough for the ingredients so I used my big mixer. I was afraid that the bread would come out tough because I used the mixer, but it wasn’t. It came out light and delicious, with a nice brown crusty crust and a soft inside-I love the nutty flavor. This one is a keeper- I’ll be making this often. Ditto your paleo breakfast bread.


As paleo guru Robb Wolf puts it, think of a 100-yard football field. The first 99.5 yards are how long Homo-Sapiens spent as hunter-gatherers. As they became REALLY good at hunting and gathering our bodies adapted to that lifestyle over thousands of years. That last half-yard represents our species after the agricultural revolution, where our diet has shifted (but our genetics haven’t).


I was told by someone.I offered these to that they remknded her of a “sweet hawaiin roll”(i made them in square brownie compartment pans) so i played with recipe and used a coarser fround almond meal and added aome ground flax seed for.a heartier, “grainier”texture. I also replaced the tapioca with arrowroot for less.sweetness and used avocado oil in place of coconut oil. The result? An amazing “multigrain” knockoff!
I just tried this for the first time tonight and followed the recipe exactly. I bought all of your recommended brands of ingredients, including the right sized pan. The texture is great (though the bread is still hot out of the oven!) and the taste is pretty good. Let’s face it, it’s not yeasted/gluten bread. But it’s definitely a very acceptable substitute. I really appreciate the nutritional content of this bread. Most of the commercial gluten-free products make me crazy with their nutritional emptiness. Looking forward to trying more of your recipes.
I am a complete fan of yours and have been trying various recipes over the years that have loved by my family! I tried making this bread today. It was cooked all the way through but looked rather pale. I wanted to put it back in the oven a little longer but feared that this plan would make things way to dry. Any thoughts with what I can do differently next time?
Hi Michelle, some people left comments above and they made it with coconut oil and also flax as an egg replacer. They said these work well, but personally I haven’t tried it. If your daughter can have the yolk , you can separate it and just use that to make the bread. Also find out if she can have ghee because although it’s made from butter, it doesn’t contain the casein that most people react to in dairy.

I am BLOWN away by this bread! I added up the protein and net carbs … umm … WOW. A huge bonus is that both kids – one of whom is crazy picky – AND my husband both love it!!!! They devoured the first loaf within a few hours. This will obviously be a huge staple in our house. It’s really a God-send. Our son, who is the picky eater, is mostly picky about proteins. He won’t eat any meat except for chicken, no eggs or dairy. We’ve gone gluten/casein free to see if it helps with his autism and as much as I totally wanted to eliminate bread, I finally just had to accept that he HAD to eat a peanut butter and honey sandwich at lunch. My cracker/veggie/peanut butter dip thing just wasn’t working. Not only will he EAT this bread – he wouldn’t eat the other gluten-free breads I was making – it is actually giving him the ONE thing he needs most – PROTEIN. Seriously, thank you, thank you, thank you!!!!!!!!!!!!!


This bread is, hands down, THE best GF/paleo bread I have ever had or made in my life. It is so simple, so easy, so perfect, and so delicious that I haven’t been able to stop staring at it, mouth agape. (Quite convenient since that makes it easier for me to continuously eat it.) With Kerry butter it is simply divine. I will never want for another quick/soda bread recipe ever again.
The rationale for the Paleolithic diet derives from proponents' claims relating to evolutionary medicine.[22] Advocates of the diet state that humans were genetically adapted to eating specifically those foods that were readily available to them in their local environments. These foods therefore shaped the nutritional needs of Paleolithic humans. They argue that the physiology and metabolism of modern humans have changed little since the Paleolithic era.[23] Natural selection is a long process, and the cultural and lifestyle changes introduced by western culture have occurred quickly. The argument is that modern humans have therefore not been able to adapt to the new circumstances.[24] The agricultural revolution brought the addition of grains and dairy to the diet.[25]
Made this bread last night to go with our homemade soup. We really liked it. I didn’t have greek yogurt so I used 1/4 cup whole milk yogurt and 1/4 cup sour cream. I also added a tiny bit of honey for sweetness. It turned out beautiful! Baked for 35 minutes. Have made many other gluten free breads and some were terrible and some just O.K. , but this is the best one we have tried. Great recipe! Can’t wait to try it toasted. Thanks so much!
Chances are, if you're following the paleo diet, you're reallllly missing bread. We don't blame you! Bread is a huge part of our routines, from avocado toast at breakfast to tomato soup and grilled cheese for dinner. There's just too many good things to eat on bread! This recipe will help curb your carb-y cravings, and is sturdy enough to recreate all your favorite sandwiches and toasts. Curious? Continue reading for answers to our most frequently asked questions.
OMGee! This is fantastic! Even my husband said this bread was amazing, and he normally dislikes anything made with almond flour. The ultimate test will be son, who I still buy normal bread for, as he doesn’t have to be gluten free, like my daughter and I. I didn’t put the palm shortening in as I didn’t have any, but don’t think it really needs it. I doubled the recipe (so glad I did), and used my English muffin rings, it made 6 of them. Enough for dinner tonight and lunch for my daughter tomorrow. Can’t wait to try more of your recipes!
I made it today. Didn’t have applesauce so I tried apricot puree. Not sure what the batter should look like mine was thick so added juice from the stewed apricots had to add water so that it resembled batter. Didn’t have the round pans so I used little loaf pans took longer to bake. End result bread chewy not fluffy doesn’t taste bad but definitely not what the picture shows. Will have to remember the applesauce next time. ? Does the batter resemble pancake batter or a quick bread batter

Hey Maya!! This is the 2nd recipe I’ve tried off your website and again I love it!! Turned out really well. I can have sandwiches again or a quick piece Of toast when I’m in a hurry to get out the door. I was skeptical about the xanthan gum since I tried a recipe using psyllium husk powder. I did not like it. I can’t taste the xanthan gum so I have no problem using it going forward. Thanks again for the recipe!!!
Thank you so much! This was delicious, didn’t crumble and fall apart like most g.f. breads. I brought it to my Bible Study group, one gal is on the Paleo diet and I am gluten free, two gals can eat anything. They all loved it. It is so easy to make, again, thank you so much for posting. I’ve already shared the recipe with two of the gals in the group.
Hi Elana! I just found your website and I’m so glad that I did! I’ve been on a GF diet for about a month after having years of terrible GI problems. I can’t remember when I didn’t have GI issues, and have done a number of elimination diets to figure out the problem. I’ve visited a few gastroenterologists and they haven’t identified anything “wrong” with me. I still haven’t pinpointed it, but overall I feel happier knowing that I’ve omitted something that was such a big part of my life before. Your bread recipe was very much needed since I still have an affinity for bread-like (carb-y) foods. The bread is delicious and SO hearty. I was skeptical at first, but it turns out I’m hooked on the stuff! Unfortunately I didn’t have coconut flour, so I ended up using 2 T of GF flour, it still worked! I have a shipment coming soon and can’t wait to try it out with the CF! Thanks again, I look forward to reading more of your posts even though I’m not a paleo nut! ;) 

Thanks for the recipe! I actually made it this morning, but instead of making it as a loaf bread, I cooked the batter up pancake style. Mostly because I wanted “bread” quickly! I really wanted a BLT for breakfast so using your batter as a pancake, made it cook quickly. Then I quickly whipped up some homemade mayo and fried some bacon. What a tasty breakfast! Thanks again!!
The Paleo Diet focuses on the mantra that if a caveman didn’t eat it, modern man shouldn’t either. This encompasses processed foods; any foods that have been harvested by the use of ranching or agriculture, such as grains or cane sugar; legumes, such as lentils, beans, peanuts and peas; potatoes; and dairy products, because early man didn’t raise cattle. All fruits and vegetables must be organic, and salt must be limited, because early man didn’t salt his food.
[…] I don't like the word "diet", so I'll say that this is more a way of changing what you eat long-term. It's all based around what our ancestor hunter-gatherers would have eaten, and what we've evolved to be able to process and absorb. The very basic level of it, is that you don't eat carbohydrates, processed meats or sugars, and cut out dairy products. You instead eat plenty of fresh meat, fish, vegetables, fruits and nuts. You can still have oil, provided it's natural – so coconut, peanut & olive oil are all good. The good thing is that you're also allowed to take this to your own level – so if you want a couple of days off a week – say, weekends, you can do it & it will still be a lot healthier for you. This is a really helpful site I've used to make a note on my shopping list of what's allowed: The Ultimate Paleo Diet Food List | Ultimate Paleo Guide […]
Made it again to nights ago. Subsituted sour cream for the yogurt. And I had found a three pound bag of the Honeyville almond flour at Costco. (It was under S20 if I remember correctly.) The bread came out so wonderful. The flour made a huge difference. Next time I make the bread I will again separate the eggs though. I only have a loaf pan that is 9 by 5 inches so the bread does come out a little flatter than it should. Between the correct flour and fluffing the egg whites it should be very close to a regular loaf of bread.
I had an awful experience with the recommended Magic Line loaf pan. The uncoated “natural” aluminum this pan is made of can dissolve and leach into food that contains acidic ingredients. I’ve been using anodized aluminum cookware for years to prevent this from happening, and I should have known better, but I ordered the pan from Amazon anyway because I wanted the little square slices.
Hi Laura, can your husband have cashews? You could try making it with cashew flour. Also, some people like substituting almond flour for pumpkin seed flour, or a gluten free oat flour. These may also work, but will give the bread a unique taste and texture. Happy to hear you’re not giving up and you want to try making another bread recipe 🙂 Please let me know how it goes.
I just wanted to say that I made this bread and it came out fantastic! I’m very pleased with it. It held together nicely and had a good taste. I felt it was also a great base for maybe some nut additions or raisin bread for a sweet twist. I’m definitely going to be playing around with this recipe. It was so EASY to put together too! Just perfect for a busy family trying to stay healthy and feel good. Thanks so much Elana!
This was fantastic!! I didn’t have coconut flour, flax meal or apple cider vinegar. I made due with regular white distilled vinegar, coconut cream powder (happened to buy some at the Filipino store last night.) I did add about a 1/4 cup of Truvia baking sugar, maybe it wasn’t even a 1/4 cup; I didn’t measure. It came out so good. Moist and springy like a sponge cake. Now I can have my bread!! Thank you so much!

The best part about baking up this bread is that it makes your whole house smell like you’re making cinnamon rolls. Scratch that, the real best part is eating this bread because it tastes like you’re eating cinnamon rolls. The only difference is you won’t be eating a bunch of artificial and processed ingredients, and instead you’ll be getting nourished by foods that your body craves, like flax seed, banana, honey, and more. Here’s a bread that you can really sink your teeth into and be totally happy with what you taste.


Adoption of the Paleolithic diet assumes that modern humans can reproduce the hunter-gatherer diet. Molecular biologist Marion Nestle argues that "knowledge of the relative proportions of animal and plant foods in the diets of early humans is circumstantial, incomplete, and debatable and that there are insufficient data to identify the composition of a genetically determined optimal diet. The evidence related to Paleolithic diets is best interpreted as supporting the idea that diets based largely on plant foods promote health and longevity, at least under conditions of food abundance and physical activity."[35] Ideas about Paleolithic diet and nutrition are at best hypothetical.[36]

Hi! I made this bread today and the taste is amazing! The only problem with mine is that it didn’t rise even a little. Yours looks lighter, light not dense. Mine was very dense and even though I cooked it longer still darker and not quite cooked enough in the inside (but the outside was very done). The only thing I did different was I used Brown flax meal and 3 duck eggs because they’re bigger than chicken eggs. The taste was amazing so I would think if I could get it too rise a bit and not be so dense it would be perfect! Do you think adding an extra egg would help out maybe just a egg white since duck have a bit more yolk? Thank you for this recipe! I’m going to try again soon!
I didn’t have the chai seeds or pumpkin seeds so I used ground flax seeds, extra sesame seeds and sliced almonds. I know flax absorbs moisture so I added about a 1/4 cup of water to the mix. OMG, I LOVE this bread. We have a local German baker who makes a multi-grain & seed bread that has always been my favorite and sells out first at our weekly farmers market. My bread tasted exactly the same. I’ve been doing keto since October and miss an occasional sandwich or toast. No more! THANK YOU for this recipe.
I made it with Egg Replacer since I’m allergic to eggs and it turned out wonderful. I did add a few drops of yellow food dye(which probably isn’t paleo but you have to eat with your eyes too) to make it look close to the look of egg yolks. It was delicious! It didn’t rise as much as the one I made with the egg yolks for a friend, but it was still DIVINE!!

Hi Broke, so there are a few things that could be affecting the texture of your bread. First, do you have an oven thermometer to make sure the temperature is where you need it to be? This could affect the baking time. It’s ok if you need to bake it longer, and I would let it cook until you test the middle of the bread with a stick inserted into the center. Only when it comes out clean you remove it from the oven.
I had an awful experience with the recommended Magic Line loaf pan. The uncoated “natural” aluminum this pan is made of can dissolve and leach into food that contains acidic ingredients. I’ve been using anodized aluminum cookware for years to prevent this from happening, and I should have known better, but I ordered the pan from Amazon anyway because I wanted the little square slices.
The last thing I can think of is the brand of almond flour you’re using and how you’re measuring your ingredients. Not all brands of almond flour are good for baking. Some are coarser and more oily then others, and this can affect the texture of baked goods. I always recommend people to use the same ingredients as I list below the recipes so that there’s no fail. If you can’t find the brands of almond flour I recommend, maybe you can order it online. My favorite brands are by Honeyville, Welbee’s and Nuts.com. Honeyville is now sold at Costco. Let me know if this helps.

Hello Elana: I have been a Paleo girl for about 8 months and am thoroughly enjoying the hunting and gathering! Today I was cooking turkey and wanted to adapt my stuffing recipe and found your Paleo bread recipe. Thanks so much. It works well with my other ingredients, mushrooms, onion, parsnips, celery, jalapeño and sausages, spicey pepper and summer savory and of course coconut oil. Can’t wait till dinner time.
Thanks for the recipe! I actually made it this morning, but instead of making it as a loaf bread, I cooked the batter up pancake style. Mostly because I wanted “bread” quickly! I really wanted a BLT for breakfast so using your batter as a pancake, made it cook quickly. Then I quickly whipped up some homemade mayo and fried some bacon. What a tasty breakfast! Thanks again!!
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