I have a processor but I use my big girl lifting weights mixer. I use the whip not the paddle to mix first the eggs getting in lots of air and and fold in 2 cups of thick yogurt cheese.(Regular non fat plain yogurt filtered though a coffee filter in the refrig.) I use the paddle and add the dry ingredients. I mix them on slow and just for a brief make sure that the dough it is all the same all the way through. I am seeing now whether I can replace the coconut oil with extra virgin elixir of the olives as sweet is not great with horseradish on roast beef. I’m also thinking that although it doesn’t rise much if at all that if I patted it into a loaf shape in some way and oiled the crust heavily it might have a smooth crust. and then plop it in the pan. I toast it like for egg in the hole by browning it in a heavy frying pan. Okay it is not bread bread but it better than no b read at all. And best of all I like it just fine and that’s what counts in the long run. Food should not be such a big deal. It should get your from point A to Point B with style and class not slathering butter on just cooked doughy yeasty hard on the digestion bread for me any more. I’m going to try going all almond flour as the coconut flour has so moisture and sweet ness that contributes to the heavy texture I think Of course the moisture is what makes it stick together too, Everything is a work in progress remember to use your processor to make crumbs out of the not so hot loaves. Breaded lemon dill tilapia anyone?
I made it today. Didn’t have applesauce so I tried apricot puree. Not sure what the batter should look like mine was thick so added juice from the stewed apricots had to add water so that it resembled batter. Didn’t have the round pans so I used little loaf pans took longer to bake. End result bread chewy not fluffy doesn’t taste bad but definitely not what the picture shows. Will have to remember the applesauce next time. ? Does the batter resemble pancake batter or a quick bread batter
Tapioca Flour: Also called tapioca starch, tapioca flour is made from the root of the cassava plant. Tapioca flour is nearly flavorless, so it’s good for using in both sweet and savory recipes. In paleo baking, this flour helps lighten up and improve the texture of paleo baked goods and make them a bit springier, and also helps with browning. This is why I like using it along with other denser paleo flours, such as almond flour.
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Overall flavor: Spot on yummy!!!! The bread is light and moist, and holds up well to a nice slice. A tad on the “oily” side, but as stated I did not use blanched flour so that may be the contributing factor. Will update when I make another batch using either a fine milled version of the almond meal I have or am able to purchase the Honeyville Almond Flour. This reminds me a tad of Irish Soda Bread, in its density and tenderness!! Can’t wait for it to cool entirely so I can make a sandwich. Perhaps Goat Cheese with Heirloom Maters and Basil!!!!
Best bread I’ve found so far! I just used almond meal instead of blanched almond flour as I haven’t gotten around to buying any yet but it is so yummy! Had some left over chicken from a roast last night and it was definitely one of the best chicken sandwiches I’ve had for a long time! Same as Kai though I think I’ll drop back the coconut oil next time by maybe a tbs or 2 🙂
Hi Romy, almond flour is lot less absorbent than coconut flour (like A LOT). I know a few people have tried using oat flour with success, but I worry that almond flour would not be sufficient for absorbing the almond butter and creating a nice, firm texture. I’d recommend starting with about 3/4 cup almond flour, and experimenting as needed. Same for the stevia! Good luck–let me know how it turns out! 🙂
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