Oh my GOSH!! It’s REAL bread! My poor little guys (okay, and me too) have really been struggling since going gluten free for the third time (this time we went Paleo and it has finally resolved their symptoms and as a side note resolved mine, though I didn’t realize in the beginning I had a gluten problem). My son and I are oohing and ahhing in my kitchen right now over this bread. I’d given up on the difficult task of making gluten free bread when the first several complicated recipes I tried were gross and gritty. I did not have high hopes for yet another bread recipe, nevertheless one that would fit into our Paleo diet, but this is seriously amazing and it was fast and easy to make in my Vitamix. Moist and delicious, we decided we had to make some quick strawberry jam to celebrate this delicious occasion. Thank you, thank you for giving my boys (and me!!) our bread back!!!
It took a month or so, but I finally decided to start playing around with adding a few other paleo-friendly starches, like arrowroot and tapioca. That’s what it took for me to come up with what I consider to be the perfect loaf. I had been holding out on adding other starches because I wanted to keep my ingredient list minimal, but really, these additions make all the difference in the end result of this bread.
This is one of the best gluten-free bread recipes I’ve tried. I made mine in a 9 x 5 loaf pan. It’s a little vertically challenged, but it still tastes good and has a nice texture to it. I’m a recovering carb-junkie who realized the one thing I craved most was likely a factor in decades worth of digestive grief. As an experiment, I eliminated wheat products from my diet and my digestive health has shown significant improvement. But I have so missed my morning toast with peanut butter. This bread is a great replacement, one that’s both tasty and nutritious (unlike store bought GF bread). It’s delicious with peanut butter, jam, butter, or just on its own. Thank you for the wonderful recipe!
I just made version #2, and it was delicious. My pan was slightly larger, but I kept the 30 minute cooking time. It came out more golden brown on the outside, but it was perfectly moist. This is SO much tastier than store loaves, and I love slicing it thick. I greased my pan with butter and coconut oil and lined it with wax paper on the bottom, and it slipped right out. 

This is the second incarnation of Paleo Bread attempted by the TGIPaleo gang, and they’ve made a few adjustments and seem to have gotten the hang of this. This version keeps the coconut flour but does away with the flax and the arrowroot flour. Instead they’re using egg whites and applesauce to get the job done, and they seem pretty pleased with themselves, as we have yet to locate a third version. Try both and see which one you like best, because they really are different styles of the same sort of bread.


This recipe looks wonderful, Elana! Till now, I made an all-almond flour bread and even though it was semi-sweet and delicious, it was also dense and chunky. Just last weekend, I caught myself wondering – what if I were to add just a bit of coconut flour to create some fluffiness? And then I started fretting about the proportions and decided to sleep on it for a few nights and postpone my kitchen adventures till next weekend.

I know that soy can cause inflammation and if you are not using soy free eggs, that could be part of the cause. It may not be the actual egg but the soy that is the problem. just a thought. Here is an article that has some interesting info on soy. http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/07/29/soy-effects-on-women.aspx?e_cid=20120729_SNL_Art_1


Most nutritionists consent that the Paleo diet gets at least one thing right—cutting down on processed foods that have been highly modified from their raw state through various methods of preservation. Examples include white bread and other refined flour products, artificial cheese, certain cold cuts and packaged meats, potato chips, and sugary cereals. Such processed foods often offer less protein, fiber and iron than their unprocessed equivalents, and some are packed with sodium and preservatives that may increase the risk of heart disease and certain cancers.

Baking with almond flour can sometimes be tricky and not all brands give you the same results. Actually, the one you cited is my least favorite and usually makes baked goods sink in the middle, get very dense and also crumbly. I highly suggest you use one of the brands of blanched almond flour I recommend. My favorites are by Honeyville, Welbee’s and Nuts(.com). Here’s Welbee’s on Amazon for $23 for 2 LB http://amzn.to/1M5cDzG
I use parchment paper to avoid the aluminum in the pan and that makes a nice liner to lift out the loaf (no cleaning!). I’ve made it with coconut oil, ghee, and regular butter… it’s always yummy! I’ve substituted coconut sugar for the honey and once even made it without a sweetener… it’s always fantastic! Occasionally I’ll substitute chia for the flax seed, too, but the basic recipe is the backbone for all my experimenting.
I am allergic to chicken eggs so I have to use duck or no eggs. I will look for lighter flax though. I just thought there was no difference but colour. I did try it with two of the duck eggs only using the whites. It came out a bit lighter but still dense. My 4 year old even loved it and that is a hard thing to do lol! I toasted in a pan with grass fed butter and put maple syrup on, he asked for it the next day (this is a child that hates breakfast food)! So good! Thank you!
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