I have recently discovered your website and I’m so pleased that I did. There is so much content there. It’s the bread I’m particularly interested in at this point since I have not had any bread for about two and a half years so I went straight there. I tried your world famous paleo bread and I must say it was very nice. However it does not look like your bread in that mine was much darker and much denser. I tried to find a comment where you addressed this issue but I only got as far as some comments regarding the height of the bread. You stated that the tin size was most likely incorrect. I’m sure my tin as a bit on the big side but when I look at the pic of your bread I can see yours is a much lighter bread than mine and also much lighter in colour.

Hello Angie, the same happened here. The taste is great except the bread did not rise. It came out flat. Do I have to slice the load in the middle to get it to rise? I replaced the ghee with regular butter but everything else was the same. Also I read on a different site that if the eggs are not room temperature than that would definitely effect the rise of the bread. I took the cold eggs straight out of the fridge to get the egg whites. What do you think?
It turned out great! Such an amazing crust crunch and it has that spongy texture that all the other paleo breads don’t. It’s soft, light and spread on with Kerrygold salted butter!!! It’s got the slightest hint of sweet. Can’t wait to make my paleo strawberry jam for this! Also excited about applegate lunch meat with this bread for sandwiches! This will be a staple for us (im allergic to preservatives).
Hi Maya, I’m new to your website and I’m anxious to try out this bread recipe. I’m helping my 27 year old son lose some weight. He’s on some pretty potent medication that has caused him to crave carbs thus putting on quite a bit of weight over the past few years. Since I’m his caregiver and also a Certified Nutritionist, I’m looking for some healthy alternatives to make his transition a bit easier and he loves bread.
Thanks for the reply Adriana. What I meant by a quick mix in the Vitamix was that I “Vitamixed” it one more time to be positive it was as fine as could be. I keep almonds frozen and I use them up over time to make milk, then dehydrate the pulp and then turn it into flour. I will have to think about buying the flour already made again…seems like I’d be going backwards in my slow but steady journey of making the most of my whole ingredients. I wonder if blanched flour would work better…I’ve read that the the only difference with the skins is the little brown specks that don’t bother me. I may try again at some point.
Hi Laura, can your husband have cashews? You could try making it with cashew flour. Also, some people like substituting almond flour for pumpkin seed flour, or a gluten free oat flour. These may also work, but will give the bread a unique taste and texture. Happy to hear you’re not giving up and you want to try making another bread recipe 🙂 Please let me know how it goes.
Hi Meredith, every photo I share with my recipes are from the same recipe. I usually photograph the food right after I make them. This bread does not rise as much as regular bread during baking, but it does rise well. I use golden flax seeds. This recipe is meant to be made on a medium loaf pan of 8½ x 4½ inches. If you have a larger pan, you can double the recipe so that when baked the bread will rise to the top of your pan and will not be so thin.

LOREN CORDAIN, Ph.D., is one of the top global researchers in the area of evolutionary medicine. Generally acknowledged as the world's leading expert on the Paleolithic diet, he is a professor in the Health and Exercise Science Department at Colorado State University. Dr. Cordain and his research have been featured on Dateline NBC and in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and other media. He is the author of The Paleo Diet and The Paleo Diet Cookbook, among other books, and makes regular media and speaking appearances worldwide.


Alyssa, one more thing. Both the bowl and the beaters need to be spotlessly clean. If there is one hint of oil anywhere the whites will not beat properly. Nicole is correct about not using a plastic bowl. Plastic will even absorb oil to say nothing of the microscopic amounts that get into the surface when it’s scratched. When baking it is always best to use a metal or glass bowl for all of your mixing.


Five roots, both bitter and sweet, are staples in the Hiwi diet, as are palm nuts and palm hearts, several different fruits, a wild legume named Campsiandra comosa, and honey produced by several bee species and sometimes by wasps. A few Hiwi families tend small, scattered and largely unproductive fields of plantains, corn and squash. At neighboring cattle ranches in a town about 30 kilometers away, some Hiwi buy rice, noodles, corn flour and sugar. Anthropologists and tourists have also given the Hiwi similar processed foods as gifts (see illustration at top).

This is a lovely, easy to make, dense bread. I really enjoyed it. I do not own a magic line pan but I purchased a “medium” sized bread pan and it seemed to work well. The bread may have come out a bit short though… I made this to use as sandwich bread in my son’s lunches. It is a bit denser than I was anticipating but it really tastes good. I just had a slice with jam and it’s filling too. This would be great as a sweet bread :). Thank you!
I just found this recipe and I notice that the recipes are very similar: this one has the addition of a little coconut flour, half the salt and half the vinegar, but maintains the baking soda quantity. How does the the texture of this bread compare to your low carb corn bread? I’m very curious about what went into the decisions that differentiate the two breads.

I know that soy can cause inflammation and if you are not using soy free eggs, that could be part of the cause. It may not be the actual egg but the soy that is the problem. just a thought. Here is an article that has some interesting info on soy. http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/07/29/soy-effects-on-women.aspx?e_cid=20120729_SNL_Art_1

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