Bailey, We’re so happy to hear you enjoyed this recipe! Regarding having bread fall, did you cook it for the full amount of time the recipe calls for, and did you cover the top with foil for the last 15 minutes? If so, there might be an issue with your oven’s calibration (you can get an inexpensive oven thermometer to check this). Another tip is to let your eggs come to room temperature first. Another factor is the altitude at which you’re baking; if you’re at high altitude, you might need to slightly adjust the oven temperature and bake time. The other thing to remember is that there will usually be a little bit of fall to most keto breads (in fact, every keto bread we’ve ever made) because keto flours lack gluten and are naturally quite dense; however, you can see in the photos, we still got a good rise on this loaf. I hope these tips help!
I cut the bread into thin slices and it is great toasted. I made a sandwich for my husband with bacon, lettuce and tomato and when I handed it to him he looked at me funny and after he took his first bite he asked me: “where did you buy this bread, can we eat bread now?” lol…. I told him I had made the bread with almond flour instead of wheat and he was thrilled.
Hi Elana! I just found your website and I’m so glad that I did! I’ve been on a GF diet for about a month after having years of terrible GI problems. I can’t remember when I didn’t have GI issues, and have done a number of elimination diets to figure out the problem. I’ve visited a few gastroenterologists and they haven’t identified anything “wrong” with me. I still haven’t pinpointed it, but overall I feel happier knowing that I’ve omitted something that was such a big part of my life before. Your bread recipe was very much needed since I still have an affinity for bread-like (carb-y) foods. The bread is delicious and SO hearty. I was skeptical at first, but it turns out I’m hooked on the stuff! Unfortunately I didn’t have coconut flour, so I ended up using 2 T of GF flour, it still worked! I have a shipment coming soon and can’t wait to try it out with the CF! Thanks again, I look forward to reading more of your posts even though I’m not a paleo nut! ;) 

Hi, Elana. Just wanted to let you know that I love this bread recipe. I make it all the time. Not long ago, I had an epic fail because I forgot to let my ingredients come to room temperature. I had quite an issue with tunneling. The bread was unusable for slicing, but I decided to cube it and dry it in the oven so I’d have some gluten-free bread for stuffing. I used it to convert my treasured cornbread stuffing recipe to a gluten-free version, and it turned out great. My recipe will be featured on my blog(www.gardenforestfield.com), with a link to your bread recipe, on Monday, Nov. 18th. Thanks for all you do.
Delicious! I had to use white rice flour as I didn’t have coconut and it wasn’t available at the store across the street. It smelled a bit odd, but tastes great! Anyone have any ideas as to why all my breads come out the height of biscotti (ok, maybe a little taller, but not much)? I use a Pyrex glass loaf pan. I try to avoid using Aluminum cookware and I’m tempted to try the cast iron pan that several people raved about, but I am definitely looking for a sandwich bread shape. I would love some feedback on that.

Finally made this recipe, is my second bread recipe I’ve made and the top is nice but the inside always feels moist … I am putting it in the oven a bit more to see if it dries out, is that the texture that it should have because of the butter or what? I liked the flavor! Just not sure of how is supposed to be inside. I haven’t watched the video yet. Thanks!!
We do the honeyville and get it from Amazon. My Holistic practitioner is fanatical about food and food that has been grown with contaminated water and thus she gets all her food tested. This is one of the only ones she says is clean from contaminates from pesticides to hidden mercury and arsenic from contaminated water, etc. Whether it’ll always be that way who knows.

The most common reason that any bread falls is that it needed to bake for longer. That being said, I’ll be perfectly honest – sometimes this keto bread recipe falls anyway, even despite doing everything else right. Fortunately this isn’t a huge deal because it still tastes delicious – IF you baked it for long enough and the center is cooked through.

Hello!! Went grain free about two months ago to reverse a chronic illness. Am feeling great but was jonesing for a piece of bread!! Big time!! And that’s what you gave me! I wish I could share the photos I have of this loaf which baked up beautifully!! It is light and airy and tastes mild and yummy. Interestingly, when I toasted it up, a hint of coconut came out (obviously from the coconut flour). Thank you so much for sharing this… sandwich here I come!!


Exercise is a vital part of the live-by-your-genetic-code equation. Surviving in the Stone Age meant a constant on-the-go lifestyle that probably required 4,000-plus calories a day, according to David L. Katz, MD, director of the Yale University Prevention Research Center. Even most people who hit the gym regularly won't need to eat that many calories, but the principle of using food as fuel to exercise still stands.
I’ve put together a roundup of 45 (that’s a lot!) recipes for Paleo-friendly / Paleo desserts. These will definitely come in handy for special occasions, birthdays, holidays, or for Wednesday night emergencies. I’m sorry Whole30 hasn’t completely changed my way of thinking yet… Let’s be real. I’m just being a realist and planning ahead, I know there will be days with chocolate in the forecast.
Legumes are members of a large family of plants that have a seed or pod. This category includes all beans, peas, lentils, tofu and other soyfoods, and peanuts. Legumes are not allowed on paleo because of their high content of lectins and phytic acid. Similar to grains, this is a point of controversy in the scientific community. In fact, lots of research supports eating legumes as part of a healthy diet because they are low in fat and high in fiber, protein and iron.
I just made this bread and it came out great although I did adjust a few ingredients. I made this bread with four eggs(1 less than called for). Also I whipped the egg whites separately until they formed peaks(in order to make the bread less dense). Lastly, I added two tablespoons of applesauce to make up for the missing egg. This bread did take 45 minutes to bake, but I lowered the temperature to 245 because the outside was cooking faster than the inside. In the end this bread came out delicious and I enjoyed it with jam and honey, happy baking.
I made this bread twice. The first time I followed your recipe exactly, but it came out dry and sort of tasteless. I think it’s because of my elevation and how dry the climate is here, so I added about a 1/4 c maple syrup the second time I made it and it’s perfect! I really like this recipe, and I hope others at high and dry climates don’t give up on it if they have the same problem.

For the dry bits, I would use a flour sifter or a sieve depending on what you have in the kitchen. Adding in the wet would require a spoon. The food processor simply takes out the labor of mixing it by hand. I haven’t made this one yet (tomorrow I will) but I’ve made banana bread more times than I can remember and only once has it been done in a food processor.


I make three loaves of Paleo 2.0 bread and Paleo Rye bread every two weeks and they both freeze well. Thanks for these recipes. All of our children and grandchildren love them. We are moving from Illinois to Colorado Springs and are worried that the high altitude will create problems. Hoping that we will find by testing how to recreate these delicious breads.

Eat low to moderate amounts of fruits and nuts. Try to eat mostly fruits low in sugar and high in antioxidants like berries as well as nuts high in omega-3, low in omega-6 and low in total polyunsaturated fat like macadamia nuts. Consider cutting off fruits and nuts altogether if you have an autoimmune disease, digestive problems or are trying to lose weight faster.


Hi Kerstin, Sorry you had issues whipping the whites. It can sometimes be more difficult with the kind from a carton. The cream of tartar helps, but sometimes isn’t enough. Did you wait for the whites to be at room temp before beginning? This can help with whipping. Unfortunately the bread won’t turn out very well without getting the whites to stiff peaks. I hope it works for you next time, and if the cartons don’t work for you, you can try with the whites from whole eggs. You can use the yolks to make hollandaise sauce or creme brulee like this.
To get an idea of what that means, we turned to the experts, including Loren Cordain, PhD, a professor emeritus at Colorado State University in Fort Collins, Colorado, and the author of The Paleo Diet; Erin Holley, RD, of Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in Columbus, Ohio; and Lona Sandon, PhD, RD, an assistant professor of clinical nutrition at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas.
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The New Evolution Diet: What Our Paleolithic Ancestors Can Teach Us about Weight Loss, Fitness, and Aging by Arthur De Vany. Art is the grandfather of the "Paleo Lifestyle" movement. The plan is built on three principles: (1) eat three meals a day made up of nonstarchy vegetables, fruits, and lean proteins; (2) skip meals occasionally to promote a low fasting blood insulin level; and (3) exercise less, not more, in shorter, high-intensity bursts. Note that the book is anti-fat. All oils are to be avoided, though canola is considered okay for higher temperatures. Egg yolks are to be skipped now and then. Published December 21, 2010.


Hi again Adriana. I tried again yesterday, with the same flour. I added a little extra yoghurt (2/3 cup) and I also added some almond milk (I think about 1/4 cup), to make more of a batter. The bread turned out great. It’s a little moist, a bit like cake, but it tastes amazing! So I actually think that the flour reacts a bit like coconut flour and soaks up a lot of moisture.

Some Paleo dieters emphasize that they never believed in one true caveman lifestyle or diet and that—in the fashion of Sisson's Blueprint—they use our evolutionary past to form guidelines, not scripture. That strategy seems reasonably solid at first, but quickly disintegrates. Even though researchers know enough to make some generalizations about human diets in the Paleolithic with reasonable certainty, the details remain murky. Exactly what proportions of meat and vegetables did different hominid species eat in the Paleolithic? It's not clear. Just how far back were our ancestors eating grains and dairy? Perhaps far earlier than we initially thought. What we can say for certain is that in the Paleolithic, the human diet varied immensely by geography, season and opportunity. "We now know that humans have evolved not to subsist on a single, Paleolithic diet but to be flexible eaters, an insight that has important implications for the current debate over what people today should eat in order to be healthy," anthropologist William Leonard of Northwestern University wrote in Scientific American in 2002.
I made this tonight and used 1.5 cups almond flour, 1/2 cup tapioca starch, subbed chia meal for flax meal, subbed avocado oil for coconut oil, and added 1.5 T caraway seeds to give it a bit of a “rye bread taste”. We had it with corned beef tonight and it was very good. I did two mini loafs which took the same amount of cooking time. My husband and older son are usually very picky about paleo breads and they both gave it a thumbs up… I think because they both like the taste of caraway. Thanks for the recipe!

Made this bread the other night and it is so wonderful!!.Love it slightly warmed with a pat of butter.My only problem is that it did not rise that much so can’t really use for a sandwich.My eggs were not fresh nor my refrigerated flaxseed meal..I used a glass loaf pan (buttered).I did cook at 350 degrees for the 30 min and it came out wonderful!!Thanks so much for the recipe.I love the recipes with honey and/or stevia, sucanat or rapadura.

Hi Valerie, so funny, I just got asked this question! 🙂 Here’s what I said, “…almond flour is a lot less absorbent than coconut flour (like A LOT). I know a few people have tried using oat flour with success, but I worry that almond flour would not be sufficient for absorbing the almond butter and creating a nice, firm texture. I’d recommend starting with about 3/4 cup almond flour, and experimenting as needed.” Hope this helps!
Hi! Was wondering if I could substitute corn or coconut flour? They are the only ones that sit well with me and I’ve begun to develop a nut intolerance. I also can’t have vinegar, and am worried about arrowroot because I haven’t had it before. I’m having a hard time finding bread recipes that I can use and I’m looking to utilize a bread machine also. Hope this finds you well and thanks for your help and insight. Your page is beautiful. ♡
Just took this bread out the oven….YUM! I didn’t have arrowroot powder or cornstarch, so I substituted that for gluten-free all-purpose flour, and it came out amazing. I also substituted a the whole flax-seed with rolled oats, added 2 tbs of chia seeds (I wanted a high protein bread) The only thing I would add: 1tbsp of honey to cut a bit of the overly savory-taste. I used a 9″x4″ loaf pan, so my bread unfortunately isn’t sandwich bread height, but what can I do to fix that?? Just use a smaller pan or make more to fill out the volume better? I know others have asked the same question, but the only solution I saw, and felt was reasonable, was to make 1.5x the amount of mix….has anyone tried this? I was wondering if anyone has tried to use 2 whole eggs and 2 whites instead of 4 whole eggs….any insight as to how this would change the bread?
Cordain argues that chimpanzees and horses avoid meat, and they have big bellies that we would have if we didn’t ditch plants for meat. He also says meat increased human brain size, and decreased stomach size so we can have the six-pack abs that chimps can’t. But I looked at his endnotes with citations to research and couldn’t find the source for these theories. I also couldn’t find research showing that legumes and grains were invented by humans.
Thank you so much for this! I have always LOVED bread and made my own before going Paleo earlier this year. Now my husband asked me to bake him Zucchini Blueberry Bread, my absolute favorite, more of a cake than bread. I knew it would be irresistible for me. The day I made his bread, I found your post (again). You said we could add fruit, so I added shredded zucchini and blueberries. AWSOME! Although it appeared to be done after 90 secs., there was a raw section inside. I put it all on a plate and microwaved a bit longer. What a great make over for an old-time favorite. Thanks again.
This was my first foray into paleo breadmaking (and eating). DELICIOUS! I had to leave the room or else I would have eaten the whole loaf. I’m experimenting with recipes to try and find a GF sandwich bread that my kids will like. I’m going to make this again but will either use the coconut cream or use sweetened yogurt or add honey to make it a little sweeter. I’m also thinking about making it in a tin can so I can cut it into round slices.
I’ve made these twice now. First time – subbed coconut oil for the palm shortening – simply because I didn’t have any. Only had one egg so used a “chia” egg as well. Baked them in ramekins. Turned out wonderful!! Second time – baked them this morning – needed an “muffin” for my egg/kale breaky. This time used “tenderfake” – lard – again no palm shortening – used 2 real, free range, organic eggs. Baked them in standard muffin tins – once again – turned out beautifully! Especially when toasted 🙂

About 3 years ago I went grain free for the second time in my life. At that time I downloaded about 20 grain free bread recipes three were good and edible and could withstand the rigors of actual lunch meat/sandwich making, but this one has stood the test of time. This is the recipe I go back to every time, it delicious and passes the sandwich test. Here s what I have learned: I like to make a double batch, I like to beat the wet ingredients into a stiff foam, everything works best at room temperature, the baking time is about an hour in a glass pyrex loaf pan, It MUST be stored in the fridge wrapped in a paper towel then in a zippy bag, it needs to be toasted for sandwiches. I make this bread for non grain-free friends and neighbors and they love it too.

This is really good. I only use 3 eggs,. I didn’t have any arrowroot powder, so I used cornstarch instead. I used lemon juice instead of ACV because ACV gives me migraines and I used coconut cream (don’t like yogurt). It tasted a bit like sweet bread, but it made an excellent sandwich. It didn’t rise like the picture. I’m sure it because of the substitutions I made. I always make sandwiches cutting the bread in half anyway so it didn’t matter that it didn’t rise as high as the picture shows. This will be my go to bread for now on. Oh yeah. I baked it for 45 minutes instead of 25. Ovens temperatures and climates varies for baking. I always baked paleo breads on 350 degrees for 45 minutes. It comes out perfect every time. Thank you so much for posted this recipe.
I’ve been experimenting with your low carb corn bread recipe this week, not necessarily trying to emulate cornbread specifically but just to make a keto-friendly bread-like food, and that recipe was the first candidate I found browsing your site. I started off with a half recipe (fudging the fractional egg) because I only had around 2 tbsp of flaxmeal (brown, not golden) on hand. I quite enjoyed it, so I bought more flaxmeal and tried the recipe substituting hazelnut flour for almond, and again brown flaxmeal for golden and it was delicious (I gotta lay off! I can’t stop eating it, as I basically haven’t had bread in 3 years!) (brief note: I needed to bake quite a bit longer than you instructed both times.)
Ugh! It’s been an hour and it doesn’t look like my bread has hardly risen at all. I haven’t made any substitutions, my yeast was good, etc. I currently live in Italy, so it’s plenty warm here today. I’ve now warmed my oven up a bit, turned it off, and have the dough in there to see if I can get any kind of rise out of it before trying to cook. Fingers crossed!
Absolutely the very very best gluten-free bread I’ve had in 8 years! Thank you thank you! I used coconut oil instead of palm oil and I don’t have round ring molds, so I poured the batch into a bread loaf pan and baked it 22 minutes. It could have gone another couple minutes longer, as it was slightly underbaked in the middle, but it still made the most wonderful sandwich! Will be making another double batch right away so I can have some every day!
Hi Erma, to keep my recipes grain-free you can substitute sunflower or pumpkin seed flour for the almond flour cup for cup. The taste is a little different but you may still really like it. These seed flour may be hard to find so you can make your own and the process is the same for making almond flour. I have a tutorial here: https://livinghealthywithchocolate.com/desserts/how-to-blanch-almonds-and-make-almond-flour-8387/
I made this bread the other day following the recipe to the T, and although it tasted delicious, I did have some problems with it. I used the same size pan and my bread came out to be about half as tall as whats pictured. Also, the first time I took it out of the oven it was still raw inside even after cooking for quite a long time, so I had to put it back in. This wouldnt be a problem, except I found that when it was finally all cooked through, It had such a thick crust on top that I couldn’t cut it without it crumbling all to pieces. Any suggestions on how to get it to rise more and how to prevent the ultra-thick crust from forming on top?

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I am so happy to have found this delicious and easy recipe. I used a regular sized loaf pan and baked it about 5 minutes less time since the loaf is thinner. Also I think I will put a piece of parchment on the bottom of the pan next time as it stuck to the pan a little bit. I thought it had a kind of like a cornbread texture. It is so good though, I believe I will be eating some of this every day for the rest of my life. Can’t wait to try some of the suggested variations!
Eat low to moderate amounts of fruits and nuts. Try to eat mostly fruits low in sugar and high in antioxidants like berries as well as nuts high in omega-3, low in omega-6 and low in total polyunsaturated fat like macadamia nuts. Consider cutting off fruits and nuts altogether if you have an autoimmune disease, digestive problems or are trying to lose weight faster.
Some Paleo dieters emphasize that they never believed in one true caveman lifestyle or diet and that—in the fashion of Sisson's Blueprint—they use our evolutionary past to form guidelines, not scripture. That strategy seems reasonably solid at first, but quickly disintegrates. Even though researchers know enough to make some generalizations about human diets in the Paleolithic with reasonable certainty, the details remain murky. Exactly what proportions of meat and vegetables did different hominid species eat in the Paleolithic? It's not clear. Just how far back were our ancestors eating grains and dairy? Perhaps far earlier than we initially thought. What we can say for certain is that in the Paleolithic, the human diet varied immensely by geography, season and opportunity. "We now know that humans have evolved not to subsist on a single, Paleolithic diet but to be flexible eaters, an insight that has important implications for the current debate over what people today should eat in order to be healthy," anthropologist William Leonard of Northwestern University wrote in Scientific American in 2002.
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