LOREN CORDAIN, Ph.D., is one of the top global researchers in the area of evolutionary medicine. Generally acknowledged as the world's leading expert on the Paleolithic diet, he is a professor in the Health and Exercise Science Department at Colorado State University. Dr. Cordain and his research have been featured on Dateline NBC and in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and other media. He is the author of The Paleo Diet and The Paleo Diet Cookbook, among other books, and makes regular media and speaking appearances worldwide.
YUM! I am going into week 3 of Paleo and missed bread. This is yummy although I need I smaller pan because it’s short. Not that that matters, I eat it alone or with grass-fed butter anyway! 🙂 I did have flax seeds, just the ground flax. And I used coconut oil (not butter) and coconut cream. It came out great! I cooked it for 35 minutes because even though the toothpick came out clean, it still didn’t “look” done. 35 minutes was perfect! Thanks for the recipe!
I might be breaking some sort of “Food Blogging Code” by posting 2 “healthy-candy-bar-esque” recipes SOSO close to each other, since we just had Paleo Homemade Twix Bars on Friday, and it’s been a hot minute since homemade paleo almond joy bars and almond joy coconut ice cream bars. I I have also been dreaming about these Paleo Almond Joy, from Beaming Baker lately. BUTTTT think of the layers of chewy-sweet date crust topped by luscious coconut cream and smooth, rich ALMOND BUTTER.
While going bonkers and eating chocolate creations 3 times per day is unnecessary (and would sorta defeat the point of Whole30, and Paleo in general) I DO think it’s a great time to explore all the Paleo dessert options out there – so we can have our cake (quite literally) – and still feel awesome after eating it.  That’s what Paleo treats and desserts are all about in my opinion – and it’s NO secret that I’m quite the fan of dessert, just check out the “sweet treats” section of the blog!

I don’t know what i’m doing wrong with this bread. I’ve made it a few times as i like how it tastes toasted but it will not cook properly in the center. Every time i cook it i end up cooking it for another 30mins longer then the recipe requires and it’s still coming out moist in the center. You could not use it without toasting put it that way. Could it be because i’m using Canned coconut milk as opposed to yogurt? I’ve tried continuing to cook with foil over the top once the outside starts to look well done so the inside can keep cooking too.

Eat generous amounts of saturated fats like coconut oil and butter or clarified butter. Beef tallow, lard and duck fat are also good, but only if they come from healthy and well-treated animals. Beef or lamb tallow is a better choice than lamb or duck fat. Olive, avocado and macadamia oil are also good fats to use in salads and to drizzle over food, but not for cooking. For more information, have a look at our beginner’s guide to Paleo and fat.


Made this yesterday and it looked/tasted beautiful! Did not do anything special (whipping the white, creaming the butter, etc) .. just folded gently and it was just a beautiful golden color. I topped it with sesame seeds because the flax seeds had already been put away. I put the dough into two mini-loaf pans and they fit perfectly. Perfect way to get my bread cravings with gest. diabetes and got two thumbs up from my diabetic dad, too, who eventually stole my other loaf! Will be making again and again. Thank you!
Paleo baked goods are free of gluten, refined sugars, and dairy. If you’ve perfected regular baking and now you’ve gone paleo, you might be surprised at just how different this way of baking is. I find that in order to get the closest simulation of regular bread (i.e., bread that has gluten), it’s often useful to use a combination of a few different paleo-friendly flours.
It took me a few days to finally getting around to making these but I did because of your sloppy joe recipe you just posted. They are awesome!!! Next time I will make a double batch of buns! I used a muffin top pan for the buns and they came out perfect for tops and bottoms so I didn’t even have to split them. They bakes up really smooth and held together perfectly for wet sloppy joes! Thanks so much for developing and sharing your recipes. I am definitely becoming one of your biggest followers! Everything you make “works”!

Growing research continues to suggest that eating a diet consisting of mostly whole foods is associated with more weight loss (2,3,4). Not to mention that highly processed foods tend to be higher in added sugar, sodium and trans fats, which research suggests may play a role in increased inflammation and actually counteract your weight loss efforts (5).  
NeanderThin: Eat Like a Caveman to Achieve a Lean, Strong, Healthy Body (Hardcover) by Ray Audette, with Troy Gilchrist, was one of the early paleo diet authors. His home page NeanderThin [now restored from archive.org] has a diet based on the ideas of paleolithic nutrition. The diet can be followed as a low-carb, moderate or high carb diet, depending upon whether and how much fruit is used. You can read up through page 19 of the book at Google Books. The original press release from 1999. [The webmaster has an extra copy with the author's signature for sale. It has the original lime-purple cover. Pristine new condition. $60 (shipping included). Paypal only. Use e-mail link at page bottom.]
Hi Kerstin, Sorry you had issues whipping the whites. It can sometimes be more difficult with the kind from a carton. The cream of tartar helps, but sometimes isn’t enough. Did you wait for the whites to be at room temp before beginning? This can help with whipping. Unfortunately the bread won’t turn out very well without getting the whites to stiff peaks. I hope it works for you next time, and if the cartons don’t work for you, you can try with the whites from whole eggs. You can use the yolks to make hollandaise sauce or creme brulee like this.
I found this recipe after buying Paleo Bread at Wholefoods. It was SO bad that it drove me to find a good recipe to make my own. When I read the review that it wasn’t too eggy, I was sold. I am not a huge fan of eggs (too bad for someone attempting a primal diet) so I was set to try this. I followed the directions exactly…even taking extra time to beat the eggs. I used the yoghurt instead of coconut cream. It came out perfect. Thank you for making something edible and still Paleo. I tried to give this recipe 5 stars but it’s having a glitch and won’t let me. 5 stars!!!

Well… it turned out beautifully. It rose evenly, it was light, fluffy and baked through. It tasted very good, both plain and toasted with butter. I truthfully do not know if I would add the butter the next time I make a loaf because I was so pleased with this version. I will likely reduce the erythritol to 1 tablespoon or less for a more subtle sweetness in the future. This recipe has so many flavour possibilities and I look forward to trying out all of my ideas using this excellent base. It is also good to know that it can be made without the additional fat component. Don’t get me wrong, I am keto and a committed high fat enthusiast but slathering some fat on top of the bread… butter, pâté, nut butter… will work just fine for me.
I was hesitant at first to try to make the bread because I didn’t want to waste the expensive ingredients. Well the bread taste even better. It doesn’t have any eggy flavor. It actually taste better than any paleo bread I’ve ever had. It was a little dense and didn’t rise as much but it was a first try with seed flour. I did have a reaction from the seeds and the baking soda. Green spots lol. My neighbor said it was the best I have ever made. It will need some tweaking. So Adriana if you find a better way to make this rise better please let me know. It was also a little greasy but just a little. I. Trying pumpkin seeds next. Thank you so much for giving us a great bread recipe that is so versitile. if anyone finds a way to improve this please let me know. You will be very happy if you try this with sunflower seed flour.
Legumes are members of a large family of plants that have a seed or pod. This category includes all beans, peas, lentils, tofu and other soyfoods, and peanuts. Legumes are not allowed on paleo because of their high content of lectins and phytic acid. Similar to grains, this is a point of controversy in the scientific community. In fact, lots of research supports eating legumes as part of a healthy diet because they are low in fat and high in fiber, protein and iron.
Whether you're living the paleo lifestyle or you're just looking for some new and fun recipes, these easy desserts are a great way to satisfy that sweet tooth. Not only are these treats considered paleo, but they're also fast, simple, and totally delicious. With chocolate recipes, be sure to pick a dark chocolate, the darker the better. And as a general guideline, stay away from granulated sugar and instead opt for natural sweetners like coconut sugar, agave, or raw honey, all of which are paleo-approved. 

My husband is a new diabetic and was put on the Paleo Diet. I have tried multiple grain free breads and have been disappointed with each and every one of them!! I don’t care for their taste and they are too small to use for a sandwich. I just baked your recipe and it has a nice crust, is MOIST on the inside, it ROSE and it tastes wonderful!! I am so very pleased and appreciative!! My search for bread is now over. Thank you so much for this ((( <3 )))


Exercise is a vital part of the live-by-your-genetic-code equation. Surviving in the Stone Age meant a constant on-the-go lifestyle that probably required 4,000-plus calories a day, according to David L. Katz, MD, director of the Yale University Prevention Research Center. Even most people who hit the gym regularly won't need to eat that many calories, but the principle of using food as fuel to exercise still stands.
As you might expect from the previous paragraph, eating plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables naturally leads to higher fiber intake. Dietary fiber is essential for good health, and despite what you’ve probably heard, whole grains aren’t the place to find it. Non-starchy vegetables contain eight times more fiber than whole grains and 31 times more fiber than refined grains. Even fruits contain twice as much fiber as whole grains and seven times more fiber than refined grains!
This was awesome. This is my second attempt at a no wheat bread. I did one before with coconut flour and it tasted like a salty cake. This is perfect. And I had to make few substitutions. Can’t wait to try the original recipe as I know it will taste even better. I had to substitute the flax meal and seeds with ground sesame and sesame seeds (no background on this, I made it up because I didn’t have flax seeds) and used olive oil instead of butter because I was too anxious to get it done and didn’t want to wait the melted butter to cool off. Even with this changes it browned perfectly, and it’s so fluffy!!! I’ll try toasting it to get a harder texture to be able to use it with toppings. Thank you very much for this recipe. 5 stars!!!
Hi Maya, I’m new to your website and I’m anxious to try out this bread recipe. I’m helping my 27 year old son lose some weight. He’s on some pretty potent medication that has caused him to crave carbs thus putting on quite a bit of weight over the past few years. Since I’m his caregiver and also a Certified Nutritionist, I’m looking for some healthy alternatives to make his transition a bit easier and he loves bread.
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Five roots, both bitter and sweet, are staples in the Hiwi diet, as are palm nuts and palm hearts, several different fruits, a wild legume named Campsiandra comosa, and honey produced by several bee species and sometimes by wasps. A few Hiwi families tend small, scattered and largely unproductive fields of plantains, corn and squash. At neighboring cattle ranches in a town about 30 kilometers away, some Hiwi buy rice, noodles, corn flour and sugar. Anthropologists and tourists have also given the Hiwi similar processed foods as gifts (see illustration at top).

I know that soy can cause inflammation and if you are not using soy free eggs, that could be part of the cause. It may not be the actual egg but the soy that is the problem. just a thought. Here is an article that has some interesting info on soy. http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/07/29/soy-effects-on-women.aspx?e_cid=20120729_SNL_Art_1


Hey, I’ve made this recipe twice now, and both times it was delicious ; however, it didn’t rise very much at all either time. I’m not a novice baker, not as experienced with bread as with cakes, but am familiar with procedure. Both times the yeast bloomed, but I feel like when I mix the other elements into the yeast, it doesn’t get to the right consistency, i.e., light and fluffy. Any tips would be greatly appreciated!

Finally found the recommended loaf size and could hardly wait to make this paleo bread. After 45 minutes and the toothpick coming out clean, removed it from the oven. After it cooled, cut it to serve and had two inches on either end and about a half an inch on the top and bottom that were edible. The middle consisted of what I would call an empty tunnel about the size of a silver dollar and surrounded by uncooked batter. Yuck. What’s so interesting is I made your Scrumptious Sandwich bread out of your book, and it turned out perfectly. I’ve been baking a LONG time, and I can’t even speculate as to what happened to this loaf. Did I have a massive air bubble in the middle, and, if so, why? Did using the food processor affect it? Any light you can shed on this will be greatly appreciated. I’ve been experimenting with the recipes in this cookbook and loving it. Please help me understand what happened to this paleo bread.

Another 2014 study in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition compared the effects of the Paleo plan to those of a standard low-fat diet on 70 obese, postmenopausal women. After six months, the Paleo group lost 14 pounds on average, while the other group lost nearly 6 pounds. After a year, the Paleo group had lost 19 pounds on average, and the low-fat dieters had dropped 10 pounds. A year later, both groups had regained some weight: The Paleo group was still down 10 pounds, while the low-fat group had dropped an average of more than 6 pounds.


I too think it’s funny how many people basically ask permission to do substitutions, as if the recipe police will come down on them or something, or like you eluded to that maybe you can predict the exact outcome of every possible substitution. Victim of your own success!! : ) You are pretty good Elana so we won’t be surprised if you develop baking clairvoyance. Thank you for this recipe, after going Paleo this year I’ve really wanted to find some baking recipes I could feel good about eating. Excited to try this!!!
Wow – great bread recipe, let alone paleo! Thank you! After reading other posts I doubled the recipe and whipped my egg whites to soft peaks, folding in gently at the end. Didn’t have enough flax so used combo of chia and flax. This made 2 good sized, lovely light high topped loaves, topped with nigella and sesame seeds (reminiscent of my favourite turkish bread from the old days). What an amazing taste and texture this bread has – will experiment with it now – I think it will be yummy with some fresh rosemary chopped and folded through or maybe lemon thyme and goats cheese feta…..
I have a processor but I use my big girl lifting weights mixer. I use the whip not the paddle to mix first the eggs getting in lots of air and and fold in 2 cups of thick yogurt cheese.(Regular non fat plain yogurt filtered though a coffee filter in the refrig.) I use the paddle and add the dry ingredients. I mix them on slow and just for a brief make sure that the dough it is all the same all the way through. I am seeing now whether I can replace the coconut oil with extra virgin elixir of the olives as sweet is not great with horseradish on roast beef. I’m also thinking that although it doesn’t rise much if at all that if I patted it into a loaf shape in some way and oiled the crust heavily it might have a smooth crust. and then plop it in the pan. I toast it like for egg in the hole by browning it in a heavy frying pan. Okay it is not bread bread but it better than no b read at all. And best of all I like it just fine and that’s what counts in the long run. Food should not be such a big deal. It should get your from point A to Point B with style and class not slathering butter on just cooked doughy yeasty hard on the digestion bread for me any more. I’m going to try going all almond flour as the coconut flour has so moisture and sweet ness that contributes to the heavy texture I think Of course the moisture is what makes it stick together too, Everything is a work in progress remember to use your processor to make crumbs out of the not so hot loaves. Breaded lemon dill tilapia anyone?
Love, love, love! I make a double batch and freeze them with great results. I toast these rolls for all kinds of sandwiches including toasted with bacon, egg, avocado for breakfast. Recently I started sprinkling Trader Joe’s Everything but the Bagel Sesame Seasoning Blend on the tops before baking. Toasted with butter is a great substitute for bagels or hard rolls. Thank you Lexi for such a great recipe!

This just got done cooling. I made 1/2 a recipe because I only have a mini food processor. I baked it in a mini loaf pan and it is delicious. :) I’m so excited to have a bread I can eat almond butter and jelly sandwiches on (which is what I’m doing right now). I did use Trader Joe’s almond meal because that’s what I have on hand and it still turned out well. I would imagine it would be even better with the right almond flour though, but even this is delicious and a great texture. :) Thank you Elana!!!!!

Hi Danielle, The bread will not rise without the baking powder, but you could try it if you don’t mind that. Some people make homemade baking powder with baking soda, cream of tartar, and arrowroot powder. But, arrowroot is still a very small amount of starch. Divided among the slices, it’s actually fewer carbs than some of the other ingredients (e.g. almond flour has a small amount of carbs also).
Love this bread only bread other then what I make at home I can eat. I have celiac disease, and Ulcerative Colitis, I have a allergy to corn, intolerance to carbs, yeast, soy, dairy, among a few other things. Julian Bakery Almond Bread is a life saver, reminds me of whole grain bread from my child hood. I love to put nutivia butter flavored coconut oil on it and toast it with cinnamon. IT does have to be toasted to hold up well but raw I like to use it to scramble in with eggs sometimes. Toasted it is great with almond butter and sugar free jam, avacado and eggs, bit of avacado mayo, and what ever else you wish. I find they work better as open sandwiches, then a true sandwich. Other thoughts try topping them with a paleo cheese after toasting and slowly warm it up to melt it on (Julian paleo cheese can take a bit to melt so low and slow as to not burn it) and it makes a lovely cheesy bread. One of my oddest and favorite things is a bit of nutiva butter flavored coconut oil and some caraway seeds as this makes it taste like a rye bread I use to eat as a child before my diagnosis.
I was told by someone.I offered these to that they remknded her of a “sweet hawaiin roll”(i made them in square brownie compartment pans) so i played with recipe and used a coarser fround almond meal and added aome ground flax seed for.a heartier, “grainier”texture. I also replaced the tapioca with arrowroot for less.sweetness and used avocado oil in place of coconut oil. The result? An amazing “multigrain” knockoff!
This came out better than I expected it to actually. I did not have coconut flour so I added an extra 1/4c of almond meal. It was a tad bland but other than that a nice bread. I think the coconut flour would add to its flavor and sweetness. I will try again and add a banana just to give it a little more flavor. the pan I used was a regular loaf pan and it was a bit thin but otherwise a nice bread. My daughter enjoyed with peanutbutter and banana mashed together and I had it with her egg salad.
Some Paleo dieters emphasize that they never believed in one true caveman lifestyle or diet and that—in the fashion of Sisson's Blueprint—they use our evolutionary past to form guidelines, not scripture. That strategy seems reasonably solid at first, but quickly disintegrates. Even though researchers know enough to make some generalizations about human diets in the Paleolithic with reasonable certainty, the details remain murky. Exactly what proportions of meat and vegetables did different hominid species eat in the Paleolithic? It's not clear. Just how far back were our ancestors eating grains and dairy? Perhaps far earlier than we initially thought. What we can say for certain is that in the Paleolithic, the human diet varied immensely by geography, season and opportunity. "We now know that humans have evolved not to subsist on a single, Paleolithic diet but to be flexible eaters, an insight that has important implications for the current debate over what people today should eat in order to be healthy," anthropologist William Leonard of Northwestern University wrote in Scientific American in 2002.
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