Another great recipe! So quick and so easy and so delicious! I used normal ground almonds, so the texture is more coarse and the bread turned out a darker than on Adriana’s pictures. I used coconut oil instead of butter and as I didn’t have enough arrowroodpowder at home I made half the amount and made muffins instead of a bread loaf. The baking time can be reduced to approx. 15 min. when making muffins.They turned out really fantastic, fluffy, moist and if you like the taste of coconut you should definitely make them with coconut oil instead of butter 🙂 I also love, that there’s no sugar involved! Thanks for sharing this recipe with us!
Make it Paleo: Over 200 Grain Free Recipes For Any Occasion by Bill Staley and Hayley Mason. The book shows you how easy it is to take any dish and Make it Paleo! Adapted from Chinese, French, Mexican and classic American meals, the over 200 recipes are each accompanied by good photos and notes to ensure you recreate each dish with ease. Most recipes are ones that can be found in an ordinary cookbook. Butter and vinegar are also used, which I do not consider paleo. Published October 20, 2011.
I’ve never left a review before, but can’t help myself because this gluten-free bread is to die for (figuratively). Although, I did make a couple of adjustments because I’m allergic to tree nuts and sensitive to coconut products. In place of almond flour I made my own cashew flour (added raw cashews to food processor and let run until as fine as I could get it without it turning into butter). I substitute the coconut solid for Spectrum Organic Palm Oil shortening. I was worried that it would taste eggy with 4 eggs, but went ahead and used 4 eggs and YEAH — not eggy tasting (to me). P.S. Cashews nuts is not a tree nut, it’s a legume.

Trick And Treat - how 'healthy eating' is making us ill by Barry Groves. The author is one of the world's most outspoken proponents of a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet. This book is an account of how and why the health-care establishment has got the concept of 'healthy eating' so wrong. Whereas Taubes work (see above) is a fairly straight forward review of the existing science, Groves expands into the politics of medical research and treatment to a much greater extent. "Trick and Treat" is divided into two parts. Part One describes the corruption in the health industry, points out the problems inherent in a high-carb, low-fat diet, and then prescribes a diet that leads to good health. The prescribed diet is high in fat - specifically animal fat, not polyunsaturated vegetable fat - and low in carbohydrates, with 60-70% of calories from fat, 15-25% of calories from protein, and a mere 10-15% of calories from carbohydrates. Part Two describes numerous diseases the author claims are the result of high carbohydrate consumption. These range from life-threatening disorders such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer to less serious problems such as acne, near-sightedness and dental problems. The Amazon reviews average to 4+ stars.

This recipe is so simple but so tasty. I use almond flour I grind myself (use a coffee grinder–it’s so much cheaper than buying bags of almond flour at the grocery store or online). The first loaf I made as stated and felt it was a little too much on the coconut. The second loaf I exchanged the coconut oil for bacon grease, which worked well but was a little too strong on the bacon. The third loaf I used half coconut oil and half bacon grease and I really love the taste. A little smear of almond butter and a dollop of jam really makes this a great Paleo breakfast!
I just tried this for the first time tonight and followed the recipe exactly. I bought all of your recommended brands of ingredients, including the right sized pan. The texture is great (though the bread is still hot out of the oven!) and the taste is pretty good. Let’s face it, it’s not yeasted/gluten bread. But it’s definitely a very acceptable substitute. I really appreciate the nutritional content of this bread. Most of the commercial gluten-free products make me crazy with their nutritional emptiness. Looking forward to trying more of your recipes.
I must admit that when I read all the comments for this recipe I was so nervous to try it even though I’ve been hand-kneeding and baking my own breads without a recipe (an ancient family tradition) for over 20 years. Since I don’t have any background in gluten-free baking but recently changed to a low-carb lifestyle, I didn’t know what to expect. I noticed that a lot of people seemed to have issues with the proofing and resting of the bread dough. In order to eliminate the possibility of this happening, and since I know I understand yeast proofing really well, and knew that I won’t have an issue with dead yeast, I made sure that my kitchen temperature would be really warm so I placed a space heater on my kitchen counter facing the yeast and then later the dough as it rested. In the end, the bread turned out near perfect. The smell and taste was fabulous. The only thing I can say is that my bread pan is a 9X5 so next time I will make 1.5 the recipe. Otherwise, all I can say is this recipe is a winner!!!!
In making the case for meat, Cordain presents anecdotal evidence of Eskimos who lived their full life without a heart attack. The Eskimo diet consists of 97% meat, which he concedes causes all Eskimos to develop atherosclerosis—a common precursor to heart disease. But Cordain says Eskimos never die of heart disease. He discusses one Eskimo who lived 45 years and another who lived 53 years, both without heart disease! He then jumps to the conclusion that because these Eskimos didn’t get heart attacks, even with severe atherosclerosis, meat must have protected them from heart disease. So Cordain’s best case for lots of meat is that you can live to the ripe age of 45 or even 53 without a heart attack. But do people—even unhealthy smokers or the obese—generally get heart attacks before age 53?
As paleo guru Robb Wolf puts it, think of a 100-yard football field. The first 99.5 yards are how long Homo-Sapiens spent as hunter-gatherers. As they became REALLY good at hunting and gathering our bodies adapted to that lifestyle over thousands of years. That last half-yard represents our species after the agricultural revolution, where our diet has shifted (but our genetics haven’t).
I recently found out I’m allergic to many of the foods that I’ve consumed over the years and was recently told to eat strictly Paleo……..and for someone who needs a map and directions in her own kitchen, for someone who has singlehandedly kept the restaurant business in the black, that’s a pretty big expectation. This bread has saved me and my fiance in so many of those, “I can’t do this any longer” moments when we really miss the old way of eating. We cant recommend this bread enough! Thank you!
Where does nutrition info come from? Nutrition facts are provided as a courtesy, sourced from the USDA Food Database. You can find individual ingredient carb counts we use in the Low Carb & Keto Food List. Carb count excludes sugar alcohols. Net carb count excludes both fiber and sugar alcohols, because these do not affect blood sugar in most people. We try to be accurate, but feel free to make your own calculations.

Ideally one should eat a wide variety of proteins from as many animal sources as possible. One need not and should not avoid fatty cuts of meat, particularly if consuming pastured sources. An often overlooked piece of the paleo diet in popular culture is an over-reliance on standard cuts of meat, at the expense of organ meats, bone broth and other collagen sources. For more information on the historical and practical aspects of consuming a more balanced protein intake, check out the Weston A. Price Foundation. If weight-loss is a goal, protein makes you feel satisfied between meals.


If you’ve ever considered (or tried) the Paleo diet, your first thought was probably, “ugh, another one with no bread?!” We feel you, it’s a tough moment when you hear your beloved carbs must go. ICYMI, the Paleo diet cuts out grains and legumes in favor of a protein- and veggie-rich diet. Sure, Wonder Bread wasn’t part of a caveman’s diet, but that doesn’t mean modern-day humans haven’t found a way around the rules.

So this is really good. Even my non paleo husband enjoyed it. I have to say I’m very glad it’s a forgiving recipe though. I had some weird internet glitch and I started making this recipe but the ingredients were off so I reloaded my page and then the correct ingredients came up. But by then I had already put 6 eggs and too much salt. Still delicious! I used tapioca because i didn’t have arrowroot. Thank you for sharing!
This must be so challenging and stressful for you, but know that young children can be very picky eaters. Typically young children like very bland, slightly sweet tasting foods, so I can see why he would like an almond butter and honey sandwich. If you can find a grain free bread that looks like the bread he likes to eat, use one slice of regular and one slice of grain-free (keeping the grain free on the bottom). And/or as he is resistant to grain free bread at this time, maybe focus on introducing other foods that he may enjoy such as cucumber, red pepper or apple slices, small pieces of cooked chicken or sweet potato and serve these with a side of almond butter to dip them into. Try introducing grain free crackers, cookies or muffins as well as paleo smoothies (into which you can sneak some greens), keep the portions small and offer him variety alongside his sandwich. He may also like the entire routine of meals and may enjoy the same meal at the kitchen table or in his highchair, so maybe packing a picnic and eating at the park might help him to try some new flavors. I hope these suggestions help, keep us posted on how things go.
By far my favorite bread recipe! It turned out golden brown with a great flavor! Super easy and basic ingredients so you don’t have to run to the supermarket before making it. I asked my husband (not paleo or gluten free) to taste it and he thought it was good. That’s quite a compliment because he dislikes most gluten free/paleo things. Just a note, I’m at 9300 feet above sea level and it still raised and turned out delicious!

I made this bread tonight and it turned out pretty good. It’s tender and has a good crumb. I didn’t have the problems that some had with holes or rawness in the middle. I used four eggs, subbed tapioca flour for the coconut flour since I was out of coconut, and subbed Trader Joe’s ground almond meal (I pretty much exclusively use the TJ’s almond meal when almond flour is called for, and have never had problems). The bread does taste a bit too strongly of soda for my tastebuds, so maybe baking powder would work just as well. I’ll try it next time and report here. My loaf did not rise as much as the photo shows. Comparing the size of the loaf to the jam jar (which is a typical small jam jar) and the spoon in the photo, I think the loaf was probably baked in a smaller pan than the one called for in the recipe. Thus it looks like it rose a lot when it really was just baked in a smaller pan.


The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living: An Expert Guide to Making the Life-Saving Benefits of Carbohydrate Restriction Sustainable and Enjoyable by Stephen D. Phinney and Jeff S. Volek synthesizes the science into one readable source. The book is excellent for general low-carb high-fat moderate protein diets. While they begin with the idea that we should eat like a caveman, they do not follow the conclusion to its logical end and have us avoid the classes of foods our ancestors would have found unrecognizable. They avoid the metobolic syndrome, but not the autoimmune diseases. They mention that monosaturates should be favored, though they are not emphasized in the menu example. The book's daily menu examples also all include dairy in one form or another. No tips are given tips for those who do not do dairy. Published May 19, 2011. The Amazon reviews average to 4+.
OMG these are AMAZING!!! I’ve made them three times in the past week and my family eats them like crazy. We haven’t had “bread” since we went Paleo in June. (Not that we haven’t tried, but these are the real deal). I always double the recipe and they always turn out perfectly. I found a little loaf pan to make them in and now I have cute little loaves of bread. I love, love, love this recipe. One of my favorite things ever! Thank you.
Fast forward 15 years later and I live in my own house with air conditioning and I make the rules. 🙂 But even though I still turn the oven on to bake in the summer (I just have to some days! Hello, it’s my job.) I still have the notion that summertime = no ovens. So I’m always looking for healthy treats to make that don’t require the oven or much effort.
My 16 month old son loves the bread. He prefers it over the bakery italian bread(full of gluten and yeast) that we normally get him. Plus our dog is allergic to grains, so now I don’t have to worry about our son sharing his bread with her. As for me, I’m allergic to yeast and I’ve wanted to reduce gluten in my diet. Finding gluten and yeast free bread is nearly impossible.
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